• In this study we investigate 89 radio galaxies that are spectroscopically-confirmed to be members of five large scale structures in the redshift range of $0.65 \le z \le 0.96$. Based on a two-stage classification scheme, the radio galaxies are classified into three sub-classes: active galactic nucleus (AGN), hybrid, and star-forming galaxy (SFG). We study the properties of the three radio sub-classes and their global and local environmental preferences. We find AGN hosts are the most massive population and exhibit quiescence in their star-formation activity. The SFG population has a comparable stellar mass to those hosting a radio AGN but are unequivocally powered by star formation. Hybrids, though selected as an intermediate population in our classification scheme, were found in almost all analyses to be a unique type of radio galaxies rather than a mixture of AGN and SFGs. They are dominated by a high-excitation radio galaxy (HERG) population. We discuss environmental effects and scenarios for each sub-class. AGN tend to be preferentially located in locally dense environments and in the cores of clusters/groups, with these preferences persisting when comparing to galaxies of similar colour and stellar mass, suggesting that their activity may be ignited in the cluster/group virialized core regions. Conversely, SFGs exhibit a strong preference for intermediate-density global environments, suggesting that dusty starbursting activity in LSSs is largely driven by galaxy-galaxy interactions and merging.
  • We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7<z\le6.4$, including 29 quasars with $z_{\rm AB}\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\le z_{\rm AB}\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\rm AB}\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\le M_{1450}\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\beta=-2.8\pm0.2$. Due to the small number of low-luminosity quasars, the faint-end slope $\alpha$ and the characteristic magnitude $M_{1450}^{\ast}$ are less well constrained, with $\alpha=-1.90_{-0.44}^{+0.58}$ and $M^{\ast}=-25.2_{-3.8}^{+1.2}$ mag. The spatial density of luminous quasars, parametrized as $\rho(M_{1450}<-26,z)=\rho(z=6)\,10^{k(z-6)}$, drops rapidly from $z\sim5$ to 6, with $k=-0.72\pm0.11$. Based on our fitted QLF and assuming an IGM clumping factor of $C=3$, we find that the observed quasar population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the $z\sim6$ IGM at $\sim90$\% confidence. Quasars may still provide a significant fraction of the required photons, although much larger samples of faint quasars are needed for more stringent constraints on the quasar contribution to reionization.
  • The FIRST survey, begun over twenty years ago, provides the definitive high-resolution map of the radio sky. This VLA survey reaches a 20cm detection sensitivity of 1 mJy over 10,575 deg**2 largely coincident with the SDSS area. Images and a catalog containing 946,432 sources are available through the FIRST web site (http://sundog.stsci.edu). We record here the authoritative survey history, including hardware and software changes that affect the catalog's reliability and completeness. We use recent JVLA observations to test the survey astrometry and flux bias/scale. Our sidelobe-flagging algorithm finds that fewer than 10% of the catalogued objects are likely sidelobes; these are faint sources concentrated near bright sources, as expected. A match with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey shows very good consistency in flux scale and astrometry. Matches with 2MASS and SDSS indicate a systematic 10-20mas astrometric error with respect to the optical reference frame in old VLA data that has disappeared with the advent of the JVLA. We demonstrate strikingly different behavior between the radio matches to stellar objects and to galaxies in the optical and IR surveys reflecting the different radio populations present over the flux density range 1-1000 mJy. As the radio flux density declines, quasars get redder and fainter, while galaxies get brighter and have colors that initially redden but then turn bluer near the FIRST detection limit. Implications for future radio sky surveys are also discussed. In particular, we show that for radio source identification at faint optical magnitudes, high angular resolution observations are essential, and cannot be sacrificed in exchange for high signal-to-noise data. The value of a JVLA survey as a complement to SKA precursor surveys is briefly discussed.
  • We report on a blind survey for extragalactic radio variability that was carried out by comparing two epochs of data from the FIRST survey with a third epoch from a new 1.4 GHz survey of SDSS Stripe 82. The three epochs are spaced seven years apart and have an overlapping area of 60 deg^2. We uncover 89 variable sources down to the millijansky level, 75 of which are newly-identified, and we find no evidence for transient phenomena. This new sample of variable sources allows us to infer an upper limit to the mean characteristic timescale of AGN radio variability of 14 years. We find that only 1% of extragalactic sources have fractional variability f_var >3, while 44% of Galactic sources vary by this much. The variable sample contains a larger fraction of quasars than a comparable non-variable control sample, though the majority of the variable sources appear to be extended galaxies in the optical. This implies that either quasars are not the dominant contributor to the variability of the sample, or that the deep optical data allow us to detect the host galaxies of some low-z quasars. We use the new, higher resolution data to report on the morphology of the variable sources. Finally, we show that the fraction of sources that are variable remains constant or increases at low flux densities. This may imply that next generation radio surveys with telescopes like the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder and MeerKAT will see a constant or even increasing fraction of variable sources down into the submillijansky regime.
  • We present measurements of a population of matched radio sources at 1.4 and 5 GHz down to a flux limit of 1.5 mJy in 7 sq. degs. of the NOAO Deep Field South. We find a significant fraction of sources with inverted spectral indices that all have 1.4 GHz fluxes less than 10 mJy, and are therefore too faint to have been detected and included in previous radio source count models that are matched at multiple frequencies. Combined with the matched source population at 1.4 and 5 GHz in 1 sq. deg. in the ATESP survey, we update models for the 5 GHz differential number counts and distributions of spectral indices in 5 GHz flux bins that can be used to estimate the unresolved point source contribution to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. We find a shallower logarithmic slope in the 5 GHz differential counts than in previously published models for fluxes < 100 mJy as well as larger fractions of inverted spectral indices at these fluxes. Because the Planck flux limit for resolved sources is larger than 100 mJy in all channels, our modified number counts yield at most a 10% change in the predicted Poisson contribution to the Planck temperature power spectrum. For a flux cut of 5 mJy with the South Pole Telescope and a flux cut of 20 mJy with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope we predict a ~30% and ~10% increase, respectively, in the radio source Poisson power in the lowest frequency channels of each experiment relative to that predicted by previous models.
  • We present the discovery of only the second radio-selected, z ~ 6 quasar. We identified SDSS J222843.54+011032.2 (z=5.95) by matching the optical detections of the deep Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 with their radio counterparts in the Stripe82 VLA Survey. We also matched the Canadian-France-Hawaiian Telescope Legacy Survey Wide (CFHTLS Wide) with the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey but have yet to find any z ~ 6 quasars in this survey area. The discovered quasar is optically-faint, z = 22.3 and M_{1450} ~ -24.5, but radio-bright, with a flux density of f$_{1.4GHz, peak}$ = 0.31mJy and a radio-loudness of R ~ 1100 (where R = f_{5GHz}/f_{2500}). The i-z color of the discovered quasar places it outside the color selection criteria for existing optical surveys. We conclude by discussing the need for deeper wide-area radio surveys in the context of high-redshift quasars.
  • We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i<19.1 in the redshift range 0.6<z<2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1"<\theta<20" and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be \Omega_\Lambda=0.84^{+0.06}_{-0.08}(stat.)^{+0.09}_{-0.07}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1" to 16.6", which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.
  • Using three epochs of VLA observations of the Galactic Plane in the first quadrant taken ~15 years apart, we have conducted a search for a population of variable Galactic radio emitters in the flux density range 1-100 mJy at 6 cm. We find 39 variable sources in a total survey area of 23.2 sq deg. Correcting for various selection effects and for the extragalactic variable population of active galactic nuclei, we conclude there are ~1.6 Galactic sources per sq deg which vary by more than 50% on a time scale of years (or shorter). We show that these sources are much more highly variable than extragalactic objects; more than 50% show variability by a factor >2 compared to <10% for extragalactic objects in the same flux density range. We also show that the fraction of variable sources increases toward the Galactic center (another indication that this is a Galactic population), and that the spectral indices of many of these sources are flat or inverted. A small number of the variables are coincident with mid-IR sources and two are coincident with X-ray emitters, but most have no known counterparts at other wavelengths. Intriguingly, one lies at the center of a supernova remnant, while another appears to be a very compact planetary nebula; several are likely to represent activity associated with star formation regions. We discuss the possible source classes which could contribute to the variable cohort and followup observations which could clarify the nature of these sources.
  • M33 contains a large number of emission nebulae identified as supernova remnants (SNRs) based on the high [S II]:Ha ratios characteristic of shocked gas. Using Chandra data from the ChASeM33 survey with a 0.35-2 keV sensitivity of about 2 x 10**34 ergs/s, we have detected 82 of 137 SNR candidates, yielding confirmation of (or at least strongly support for) their SNR identifications. This provides the largest sample of remnants detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths in any galaxy, including the Milky Way. A spectral analysis of the seven X-ray brightest SNRs reveals that two, G98-31 and G98-35, have spectra that appear to indicate enrichment by ejecta from core-collapse supernova explosions. In general, the X-ray detected SNRs have soft X-ray spectra compared to the vast majority of sources detected along the line of sight to M33. It is unlikely that there are any other undiscovered thermally dominated X-ray SNRs with luminosities in excess of about 4 x 10**35 ergs/s in the portions of M33 covered by the ChASeM33 survey. We have used a combination of new and archival optical and radio observations to attempt to better understand why some objects are detected as X-ray sources and others are not. We have also developed a morphological classification scheme for the optically-identified SNRs, and discuss the efficacy of this scheme as a predictor of X-ray detectability. Finally, we have compared the SNRs found in M33 to those that have been observed in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. There are no close analogs of Cas A, Kepler's SNR, Tycho's SNR or the Crab Nebula in the regions of M33 surveyed, but we have found an X-ray source with a power law spectrum coincident with a small-diameter radio source that may be the first pulsar-wind nebula recognized in M33.
  • We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z>2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z_s=2.237, lens redshift z_l=0.294, and image separation \theta=4.04"), SDSS J1254+2235 (z_s=3.626, \theta=1.56"), SDSS J1258+1657 (z_s=2.702, \theta=1.28"), SDSS J1339+1310 (z_s=2.243, \theta=1.69"), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z_s=3.317, \theta=1.74"). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z_l=0.2-0.8 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z_s<2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.
  • We present results on a survey to find extremely dust-reddened Type-1 Quasars. Combining the FIRST radio survey, the 2MASS Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have selected a candidate list of 122 potential red quasars. With more than 80% spectroscopically identified objects, well over 50% are classified as dust-reddened Type 1 quasars, whose reddenings (E(B-V)) range from approximately 0.1 to 1.5 magnitudes. They lie well off the color selection windows usually used to detect quasars and many fall within the stellar locus, which would have made it impossible to find these objects with traditional color selection techniques. The reddenings found are much more consistent with obscuration happening in the host galaxy rather than stemming from the dust torus. We find an unusually high fraction of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars at high redshift, all but one of them belonging to the Low Ionization BAL (LoBAL) class and many also showing absorption the metastable FeII line (FeLoBAL). The discovery of further examples of dust-reddened LoBAL quasars provides more support for the hypothesis that BAL quasars (at least LoBAL quasars) represent an early stage in the lifetime of the quasar. The fact that we see such a high fraction of BALs could indicate that the quasar is in a young phase in which quasar feedback from the BAL winds is suppressing star formation in the host galaxy.
  • We present cosmological results from the statistics of lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search. By taking proper account of the selection function, we compute the expected number of quasars lensed by early-type galaxies and their image separation distribution assuming a flat universe, which is then compared with 7 lenses found in the SDSS Data Release 3 to derive constraints on dark energy under strictly controlled criteria. For a cosmological constant model (w=-1) we obtain \Omega_\Lambda=0.74^{+0.11}_{-0.15}(stat.)^{+0.13}_{-0.06}(syst.). Allowing w to be a free parameter we find \Omega_M=0.26^{+0.07}_{-0.06}(stat.)^{+0.03}_{-0.05}(syst.) and w=-1.1\pm0.6(stat.)^{+0.3}_{-0.5}(syst.) when combined with the constraint from the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample. Our results are in good agreement with earlier lensing constraints obtained using radio lenses, and provide additional confirmation of the presence of dark energy consistent with a cosmological constant, derived independently of type Ia supernovae.
  • We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 (~4188 deg^2), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1'' and 20'' and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10^{-0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations (~1''-2'') and one is a large separation (15'') system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.
  • We present Hubble ACS images of thirteen dust reddened Type-1 quasars selected from the FIRST/2MASS Red Quasar Survey. These quasars have high intrinsic luminosities after correction for dust obscuration (-23.5 > M_B > -26.2 from K-magnitude). The images show strong evidence of recent or ongoing interaction in eleven of the thirteen cases, even before the quasar nucleus is subtracted. None of the host galaxies are well fit by a simple elliptical profile. The fraction of quasars showing interaction is significantly higher than the 30% seen in samples of host galaxies of normal, unobscured quasars. There is a weak correlation between the amount of dust reddening and the magnitude of interaction in the host galaxy, measured using the Gini coefficient and the Concentration index. Although few host galaxy studies of normal quasars are matched to ours in intrinsic quasar luminosity, no evidence has been found for a strong dependence of merger activity on host luminosity in samples of the host galaxies of normal quasars. We thus believe that the high merger fraction in our sample is related to their obscured nature, with a significant amount of reddening occurring in the host galaxy. The red quasar phenomenon seems to have an evolutionary explanation, with the young quasar spending the early part of its lifetime enshrouded in an interacting galaxy. This might be further indication of a link between AGN and starburst galaxies.
  • We present the discovery of five quasars at z~6 selected from 260 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the Celestial Equator. The five quasars with 20<z_{AB}<21 are 1-2 magnitudes fainter than the luminous z~6 quasars discovered in the SDSS main survey. One of them was independently discovered by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. These quasars, combined with another z~6 quasar known in this region, make a complete flux- limited quasar sample at z_{AB}<21. The sample spans the redshift range 5.85<z<6.12 and the luminosity range -26.5<M_{1450}<-25.4 (H_0=70 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}, Omega_{m}=0.3, and Omega_{Lambda}=0.7). We use the 1/V_{a} method to determine that the comoving quasar spatial density at <z>=6.0 and <M_{1450}>=-25.8 is (5.0+/-2.1) x 10^{-9} Mpc^{-3} mag^{-1}. We model the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z~6 as a power law Phi(L_{1450}) \propto L_{1450}^{beta}. The slope beta calculated from a combination of our sample and the luminous SDSS quasar sample is -3.1+/-0.4, significantly steeper than the slope of the QLF at z~4. Based on the derived QLF, we find that the quasar/AGN population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z~6 unless the IGM is very homogeneous and the luminosity (L*_{1450}) at which the QLF power law breaks is very low.
  • We correlate the positions of 13,240 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) with 0.1 <= z <= 0.3 from the maxBCG catalog with radio sources from the FIRST survey to study the sizes and distributions of radio AGN in galaxy clusters. We find that 19.7% of our BCGs are associated with FIRST sources, and this fraction depends on the stellar mass of the BCG, and to a lesser extent on the richness of the parent cluster (in the sense of increasing radio loudness with increasing mass). The intrinsic size of the radio emission associated with the BCGs peaks at 55 kpc, with a tail extending to 200 kpc. The radio power of the extended sources places them on the divide between FR I and FR II type sources, while sources compact in the radio tend to be somewhat less radio-luminous. We also detect an excess of radio sources associated with the cluster, instead of with the BCG itself, extending out to ~1.4 Mpc.
  • We report the discovery of a cluster-scale lensed quasar, SDSS J1029+2623, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The lens system exhibits two lensed images of a quasar at z_s=2.197. The image separation of 22.5" makes it the largest separation lensed quasar discovered to date. The similarity of the optical spectra and the radio loudnesses of the two components support the lensing hypothesis. Images of the field show a cluster of galaxies at z_l~0.55 that is responsible for the large image separation. The lensed images and the cluster light center are not collinear, which implies that the lensing cluster has a complex structure.
  • We report the discoveries of the two-image gravitationally lensed quasars, SDSS J0746+4403 and SDSS J1406+6126, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). SDSS J0746+4403, which will be included in our lens sample for statistics and cosmology, has a source redshift of z_s=2.00, an estimated lens redshift of z_l~0.3, and an image separation of 1.08". SDSS J1406+6126 has a source redshift of z_s=2.13, a spectroscopically measured lens redshift of z_l=0.27, and an image separation of 1.98". We find that the two quasar images of SDSS J1406+6126 have different intervening MgII absorption strengths, which are suggestive of large variations of absorbers on kpc scales. The positions and fluxes of both the lensed quasar systems are easily reproduced by simple mass models with reasonable parameter values. These objects bring to 18 the number of lensed quasars that have been discovered from the SDSS data.
  • We present a technique to explore the radio sky into the nanoJansky regime by employing image stacking using the FIRST survey. We first discuss the non-intuitive relationship between the mean and median values of a distribution that is dominated by noise, followed by an analysis of the systematic effects present in FIRST's 20cm VLA snapshot images. Image stacking allows us to recover the properties of source populations with fluxes a factor of 30 or more below the rms noise level. Mean estimates of radio flux density, luminosity, etc., are derivable for any source class having arcsecond positional accuracy. We use this technique to compute the mean radio properties for 41,295 quasars from the SDSS DR3 catalog. There is a tight correlation between optical and radio luminosity, with the radio luminosity increasing as the 0.85 power of optical luminosity. This implies declining radio-loudness with optical luminosity: the most luminous objects (M=-28.5) have average radio-to-optical ratios 3 times lower than the least luminous objects (M=-20). There is also a striking correlation between optical color and radio loudness: quasars that are either redder or bluer than the norm are brighter radio sources, with objects 0.8 magnitudes redder than the SDSS composite spectrum having radio-loudness ratios that are higher by a factor of 10. We explore the longstanding question of whether a radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy exists in quasars, finding that optical selection effects probably dominate the distribution function of radio loudness, which has at most a modest (~20%) inflection between the radio-loud and radio-quiet ends of the distribution. We also find, surprisingly, that broad absorption line quasars have higher mean radio flux densities, with the greatest disparity arising in the rare low-ionization BAL subclass.
  • We have detected FIRST J101614.3+520916 with the XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory. FIRST J101614.3+520916, one of the most extreme radio-loud, broad absorption line (BAL) quasars so far discovered, is also a Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio source. We find that, compared to its estimated intrinsic X-ray flux, the observed X-rays are likely suppressed, and that the observed hardness ratio indicates significant soft X-ray photons. This is inconsistent with the simplest model, a normal quasar spectrum absorbed by a large neutral HI column density, which would primarily absorb the softer photons. More complex models, involving partial covering, an ionized absorber, ionized mirror reflection, or jet contributions need to be invoked to explain this source. The suppressed but soft X-ray emission in this radio-loud BAL quasar is consistent with the behavior displayed by other BAL quasars, both radio-loud and radio-quiet.
  • From examination of only 4 deg^2 of sky in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) region, we have identified the first radio-loud quasar at a redshift z>6. The object, FIRST J1427385+331241, was discovered by matching the FLAMEX IR survey to FIRST survey radio sources with NDWFS counterparts. One candidate z>6 quasar was found, and spectroscopy with the Keck II telescope confirmed its identification, yielding a redshift z=6.12. The object is a Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasar with an optical luminosity of M_B ~ -26.9 and a radio-to-optical flux ratio ~ 60. Two MgII absorptions systems are present at redshifts of z=2.18 and z=2.20. We briefly discuss the implications of this discovery for the high-redshift quasar population.
  • EF Eri is a magnetic cataclysmic variable that has been in a low accretion state for the past nine years. Low state optical spectra reveal the underlying Zeeman-split white dwarf absorption lines. These features are used to determine a value of 13-14 MG as the white dwarf field strength. Recently, 5-7 years into the low state, Balmer and other emission lines have appeared in the optical. An analysis of the H$\alpha$ emission line yields the first radial velocity solution for EF Eri, leading to a spectroscopic ephemeris for the binary and, using the best available white dwarf mass of 0.6M${\odot}$, a mass estimate for the secondary of 0.055M${\odot}$. For a white dwarf mass of 0.95M${\odot}$, the average for magnetic white dwarfs, the secondary mass increases to 0.087M${\odot}$. At EF Eri's orbital period of 81 minutes, this higher mass secondary could not be a normal star and still fit within the Roche lobe. The source of the Balmer and other emission lines is confirmed to be from the sub-stellar secondary and we argue that it is due to stellar activity. We compare EF Eri's emission line spectrum and activity behavior to that recently observed in AM Her and VV Pup and attributed to stellar activity. We explore observations and models originally developed for V471 Tau, for the RS CVn binaries, and for extra-solar planets. We conclude that irradiation of the secondary in EF Eri and similar systems is unlikely and, in polars, the magnetic field interaction between the two stars (with a possible tidal component) is a probable mechanism which would concentrate chromospheric activity on the secondary near the sub-stellar point of the white dwarf.
  • We study the evolution of the ionization state of the IGM at the end of the reionization epoch using spectra of a sample of nineteen quasars at 5.74<z<6.42 discovered in the SDSS. Three methods are used to trace IGM properties: (a) the evolution of the Gunn-Peterson optical depth in the Ly alpha,beta, and gamma; (b) the distribution of dark absorption gaps, and (c) the size of HII regions around quasars. We find that the evolution of the IGM accelerated at z>5.7: the optical depth evolution changes from tau ~ (1+z)^{4.3} to (1+z)^{>11}, and the average length of dark gaps with tau>3.5 increases from <10 to >80 comoving Mpc. The dispersion of IGM properties along different lines of sight also increases rapidly, implying fluctuations by a factor of >4 in the UV background at z>6, when the mean free path of UV photons is comparable to the correlation length of galaxies. The mean length of dark gaps shows the most dramatic increase at z~6, as well as the largest varianace. We suggest using dark gap statistics as a powerful probe of the ionization state of the IGM at yet higher redshift. The sizes of HII regions around quasars decrease rapidly towards higher redshift, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the IGM has increased by a factor of >10 from z=5.7 to 6.4. The mass-averaged neutral fraction is 1-4% at z~6.2 based on the GP optical depth and HII region sizes. The observations suggest that z~6 is the the end of the overlapping stage of reionization, and are inconsistent with a neutral IGM at z~6, as indicated by the finite length of dark absorption gaps.
  • We report the discoveries of two, two-image gravitationally lensed quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J0806+2006 at z_s=1.540 and SDSS J1353+1138 at z_s=1.629 with image separations of 1.40" and 1.41" respectively. Spectroscopic and optical/near-infrared imaging follow-up observations show that the quasar images have identical redshifts and possess extended objects between the images that are likely to be lens galaxies at z_l~0.6 in SDSS J0806+2006 and z_l~0.3 in SDSS J1353+1138. The field of SDSS J0806+2006 contains several nearby galaxies that may significantly perturb the system, and SDSS J1353+1138 has an extra component near its Einstein ring that is probably a foreground star. Simple mass models with reasonable parameters reproduce the quasar positions and fluxes of both systems.
  • We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not have complete Ly beta absorption.