• We present 870 $\mu$m ALMA dust polarization observations of 10 young Class 0/I protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. At $\sim$ 0.35$"$ (80 au) resolution, all of our sources show some degree of polarization, with most (9/10) showing significantly extended emission in the polarized continuum. Each source has incredibly intricate polarization signatures. In particular, all three disk-candidates have polarization vectors roughly along the minor axis, which is indicative of polarization produced by dust scattering. On $\sim$ 100 au scales, the polarization is at a relatively low level ($\lesssim 1\%$) and is quite ordered. In sources with significant envelope emission, the envelope is typically polarized at a much higher ($\gtrsim 5\%$) level and has a far more disordered morphology. We compute the cumulative probability distributions for both the small (disk-scale) and large (envelope-scale) polarization percentage. We find that the two are intrinsically different, even after accounting for the different detection thresholds in the high/low surface brightness regions. We perform Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling tests on the distributions of angle offsets of the polarization from the outflow axis. We find disk-candidate sources are different from the non-disk-candidate sources. We conclude that the polarization on the 100 au scale is consistent with the signature of dust scattering for disk-candidates and that the polarization on the envelope-scale in all sources may come from another mechanism, most likely magnetically aligned grains.
  • Centimeter continuum emission from protostars offers insight into the innermost part of the outflows, as shock-ionized gas produces free-free emission. We observed a complete population of Class 0 and I protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud at 4.1 cm and 6.4 cm with resolution and sensitivity superior to previous surveys. From a total of 71 detections, 8 sources exhibit resolved emission at 4.1 cm and/or 6.4 cm. In this paper we focus on this sub-sample, analyzing their spectral indices along the jet, and their alignment with respect to the large-scale molecular outflow. Spectral indices for fluxes integrated toward the position of the protostar are consistent with free-free thermal emission. The value of the spectral index along a radio jet decreases with distance from the protostar. For six sources, emission is well aligned with the outflow central axis, showing that we observe the ionized base of the jet. This is not the case for two sources, where we note misalignment of the emission with respect to the large-scale outflow. This might indicate that the emission does not originate in the radio jet, but rather in an ionized outflow cavity wall or disk surface. For five of the sources, the spectral indices along the jet decrease well below the thermal free-free limit of -0.1 with $>2\sigma$ significance. This is indicative of synchrotron emission, meaning that high energy electrons are being produced in the outflows close to the disk. This result can have far-reaching implications for the chemical composition of the embedded disks.
  • We present a high angular resolution ($\sim 0.2^{\prime\prime}$), high sensitivity ($\sigma \sim 0.2$ mJy) survey of the 870 $\mu$m continuum emission from the circumstellar material around 49 pre-main sequence stars in the $\rho$ Ophiuchus molecular cloud. Because most millimeter instruments have resided in the northern hemisphere, this represents the largest high-resolution, millimeter-wave survey of the circumstellar disk content of this cloud. Our survey of 49 systems comprises 63 stars; we detect disks associated with 29 single sources, 11 binaries, 3 triple systems and 4 transition disks. We present flux and radius distributions for these systems; in particular, this is the first presentation of a reasonably complete probability distribution of disk radii at millimeter-wavelengths. We also compare the flux distribution of these protoplanetary disks with that of the disk population of the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. We find that disks in binaries are both significantly smaller and have much less flux than their counterparts around isolated stars. We compute truncation calculations on our binary sources and find that these disks are too small to have been affected by tidal truncation and posit some explanations for this. Lastly, our survey found 3 candidate gapped disks, one of which is a newly identified transition disk with no signature of a dip in infrared excess in extant observations.
  • Gravitational forces are expected to excite spiral density waves in protoplanetary disks, disks of gas and dust orbiting young stars. However, previous observations that showed spiral structure were not able to probe disk midplanes, where most of the mass is concentrated and where planet formation takes place. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array we detected a pair of trailing symmetric spiral arms in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star Elias 2-27. The arms extend to the disk outer regions and can be traced down to the midplane. These millimeter-wave observations also reveal an emission gap closer to the star than the spiral arms. We argue that the observed spirals trace shocks of spiral density waves in the midplane of this young disk.
  • This paper reports on the modal noise characterisation of a hybrid reformatter. The device consists of a multicore-fibre photonic lantern and an ultrafast laser-inscribed slit reformatter. It operates around 1550 nm and supports 92 modes. Photonic lanterns transform a multimode signal into an array of single-mode signals, and thus combine the high coupling efficiency of multimode fibres with the diffraction-limited performance of single-mode fibres. This paper presents experimental measurements of the device point spread function properties under different coupling conditions, and its throughput behaviour at high spectral resolution. The device demonstrates excellent scrambling but its point spread function is not completely stable. Mode field diameter and mode barycentre position at the device output vary as the multicore-fibre is agitated due to the fabrication imperfections.
  • There is substantial evidence for disk formation taking place during the early stages of star formation and for most stars being born in multiple systems; however, protostellar multiplicity and disk searches have been hampered by low resolution, sample bias, and variable sensitivity. We have conducted an unbiased, high-sensitivity Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) survey toward all known protostars (n = 94) in the Perseus molecular cloud (d~230 pc), with a resolution of ~15 AU (0.06") at 8 mm. We have detected candidate protostellar disks toward 17 sources (with 12 of those in the Class 0 stage) and we have found substructure on < 50AU scales for three Class 0 disk candidates, possibly evidence for disk fragmentation. We have discovered 16 new multiple systems (or new components) in this survey; the new systems have separations < 500 AU and 3 by < 30 AU. We also found a bi-modal distribution of separations, with peaks at ~75 AU and ~3000 AU, suggestive of formation through two distinct mechanisms: disk and turbulent fragmentation. The results from this survey demonstrate the necessity and utility of uniform, unbiased surveys of protostellar systems at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths.
  • Dust polarization in millimeter (and centimeter) has been mapped in disks around an increasing number of young stellar objects. It is usually thought to come from emission by magnetically aligned (non-spherical) grains, but can also be produced by dust scattering. We present a semi-analytic theory of disk polarization that includes both the direction emission and scattering, with an emphasis on their relative importance and how they are affected by the disk inclination. For face-on disks, both emission and scattering tend to produce polarization in the radial direction, making them difficult to distinguish, although the scattering-induced polarization can switch to the azimuthal direction if the incident radiation is beamed strongly enough in the radial direction in the disk plane. Disk inclination affects the polarizations from emission and scattering differently, especially on the major axis where, in the edge-on limit, the former vanishes while the latter reaches a polarization fraction as large as 1/3. The polarizations from the two competing mechanisms tend to cancel each other on the major axis, producing two low polarization "holes" (one on each side of the center) under certain conditions. We find tantalizing evidence for at least one such "hole" in NGC1333 IRAS4A1, whose polarization observed at 8 mm on the 100 AU scale is indicative of a pattern dominated by scattering close to the center and by direction emission in the outer region. If true, it would imply not only that a magnetic field exists on the disk scale, but that it is strong enough to align large, possibly mm-sized, grains.
  • We present a multiplicity study of all known protostars (94) in the Perseus molecular cloud from a Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) survey at Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 cm and 6.6 cm). The observed sample has a bolometric luminosity range between 0.1 L$_{\odot}$ and $\sim$33 L$_{\odot}$, with a median of 0.7 L$_{\odot}$. This multiplicity study is based on the Ka-band data, having a best resolution of $\sim$0.065" (15 AU) and separations out to $\sim$43" (10000 AU) can be probed. The overall multiplicity fraction (MF) is found to be of 0.40$\pm$0.06 and the companion star fraction (CSF) is 0.71$\pm$0.06. The MF and CSF of the Class 0 protostars are 0.57$\pm$0.09 and 1.2$\pm$0.2, and the MF and CSF of Class I protostars are both 0.23$\pm$0.08. The distribution of companion separations appears bi-modal, with a peak at $\sim$75 AU and another peak at $\sim$3000 AU. Turbulent fragmentation is likely the dominant mechanism on $>$1000 AU scales and disk fragmentation is likely to be the dominant mechanism on $<$200 AU scales. Toward three Class 0 sources we find companions separated by $<$30 AU. These systems have the smallest separations of currently known Class 0 protostellar binary systems. Moreover, these close systems are embedded within larger (50 AU to 400 AU) structures and may be candidates for ongoing disk fragmentation.
  • We present the first dust emission results toward a sample of seven protostellar disk candidates around Class 0 and I sources in the Perseus molecular cloud from the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) survey with ~0.05'' or 12 AU resolution. To examine the surface brightness profiles of these sources, we fit the Ka-band 8 mm dust-continuum data in the u,v-plane to a simple, parametrized model based on the Shakura-Sunyaev disk model. The candidate disks are well-fit by a model with a disk-shaped profile and have masses consistent with known Class 0 and I disks. The inner-disk surface densities of the VANDAM candidate disks have shallower density profiles compared to disks around more evolved Class II systems. The best-fit model radii of the seven early-result candidate disks are R_c > 10 AU; at 8 mm, the radii reflect lower limits on the disk size since dust continuum emission is tied to grain size and large grains radially drift inwards. These relatively large disks, if confirmed kinematically, are inconsistent with theoretical models where the disk size is limited by strong magnetic braking to < 10 AU at early times.
  • The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided-wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point-spread-function (PSF). We address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 $\pm$ 80 nm stellar light, the device is found to exhibit a transmission of 47-53 % depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully-optimised guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.
  • We present continuum and molecular line observations at 230 GHz and 345 GHz from the Sub-millimeter Array (SMA) toward three protostars in the Perseus L1448N region. The data are from the large project "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA" (MASSES). Three dust continuum sources, Source B, Source NW, and Source A, are detected at both frequencies. These sources have corresponding emission peaks in C18O (J=2-1), 13CO (J=2-1), and HCO+ (J=4-3), and have offsets with N2D+ (J=3-2) peaks. High angular resolution data from a complimentary continuum survey with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that Source B is associated with three 8 mm continuum objects, Source NW with two, and Source A remains single. These results suggest that multiplicity in L1448N exists at different spatial scales from a few thousand AU to < 100 AU. Velocity gradients in each source obtained from two-dimensional fits to the SMA C18O emission are found to be perpendicular to within 20 degrees of the outflow directions as revealed by 12CO (J=2-1). We have observed that Sources B and NW with multiplicity have higher densities than Source A without multiplicity. This suggests that thermal Jeans fragmentation can be relevant in the fragmentation process. However, we have not observed a difference in the ratio between rotational and gravitational energy between sources with and without multiplicity. We also have not observed a trend between non-thermal velocity dispersions and the level of fragmentation. Our study has provided the first direct and comprehensive comparison between multiplicity and core properties in low-mass protostars, although based on small number statistics.
  • Magnetic fields can regulate disk formation, accretion and jet launching. Until recently, it has been difficult to obtain high resolution observations of the magnetic fields of the youngest protostars in the critical region near the protostar. The VANDAM survey is observing all known protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. Here we present the polarization data of IRAS 4A. We find that with ~ 0.2'' (50 AU) resolution at {\lambda} = 8.1 and 10.3 mm, the inferred magnetic field is consistent with a circular morphology, in marked contrast with the hourglass morphology seen on larger scales. This morphology is consistent with frozen-in field lines that were dragged in by rotating material entering the infall region. The field morphology is reminiscent of rotating circumstellar material near the protostar. This is the first polarization detection of a protostar at these wavelengths. We conclude from our observations that the dust emission is optically thin with {\beta} ~ 1.3, suggesting that mm/cm-sized grains have grown and survived in the short lifetime of the protostar.
  • We present new results from the Disks@EVLA program for two young stars: CY Tau and DoAr 25. We trace continuum emission arising from their circusmtellar disks from spatially resolved observations, down to tens of AU scales, at {\lambda} = 0.9, 2.8, 8.0, and 9.8 mm for DoAr25 and at {\lambda} = 1.3, 2.8, and 7.1 mm for CY Tau. Additionally, we constrain the amount of emission whose origin is different from thermal dust emission from 5 cm observations. Directly from interferometric data, we find that observations at 7 mm and 1 cm trace emission from a compact disk while millimeter-wave observations trace an extended disk structure. From a physical disk model, where we characterize the disk structure of CY Tau and DoAr 25 at wavelengths shorter than 5 cm, we find that (1) dust continuum emission is optically thin at the observed wavelengths and over the spatial scales studied, (2) a constant value of the dust opacity is not warranted by our observations, and (3) a high-significance radial gradient of the dust opacity spectral index, {\beta}, is consistent with the observed dust emission in both disks, with low-{\beta} in the inner disk and high-{\beta} in the outer disk. Assuming that changes in dust properties arise solely due to changes in the maximum particle size (amax), we constrain radial variations of amax in both disks, from cm-sized particles in the inner disk (R < 40 AU) to millimeter sizes in the outer disk (R > 80 AU). These observational constraints agree with theoretical predictions of the radial-drift barrier, however, fragmentation of dust grains could explain our amax(R) constraints if these disks have lower turbulence and/or if dust can survive high-velocity collisions.
  • The spectral resolution of a dispersive spectrograph is dependent on the width of the entrance slit. This means that astronomical spectrographs trade-off throughput with spectral resolving power. Recently, optical guided-wave transitions known as photonic lanterns have been proposed to circumvent this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of multimode light into a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis, but diffraction-limited in the other. Here, we demonstrate the successful reformatting of a telescope point spread function into such a slit using a three-dimensional integrated optical waveguide device, which we name the photonic dicer. Using the CANARY adaptive optics demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and light centred at 1530 nm with a 160 nm FWHM, the device shows a transmission of between 10 and 20\% depending upon the type of AO correction applied. Most of the loss is due to the overfilling of the input aperture in poor and moderate seeing. Taking this into account, the photonic device itself has a transmission of 57 $\pm$ 4\%.We show how a fully-optimised device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.
  • We are conducting a Jansky VLA Ka-band (8 mm and 1 cm) and C-band (4 cm and 6.4 cm) survey of all known protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud, providing resolution down to $\sim$0.06'' and $\sim$0.35" in Ka-band and C-band, respectively. Here we present first results from this survey that enable us to examine the source NGC 1333 IRAS2A in unprecedented detail and resolve it into a proto-binary system separated by 0.621"$\pm$0.006" ($\sim$143 AU) at 8 mm, 1 cm, and 4 cm. These 2 sources (IRAS2A VLA1 and VLA2) are likely driving the two orthogonal outflows known to originate from IRAS2A. The brighter source IRAS2A VLA1 is extended perpendicular to its outflow in the VLA data, with a deconvolved size of 0.055" ($\sim$13 AU), possibly tracing a protostellar disk. The recently reported candidate companions (IRAS2A MM2 and MM3) are not detected in either our VLA data, CARMA 1.3 mm data, or SMA 850 $\mu$m data. SMA CO ($J=3\rightarrow2$), CARMA CO ($J=2\rightarrow1$), and lower resolution CARMA CO ($J=1\rightarrow0$) observations are used to examine the outflow origins and the nature of the candidate companions to IRAS2A VLA1. The CO ($J=3\rightarrow2$) and ($J=2\rightarrow1$) data show that IRAS2A MM2 is coincident with a bright CO emission spot in the east-west outflow, and IRAS2A MM3 is within the north-south outflow. In contrast, IRAS2A VLA2 lies at the east-west outflow symmetry point. We propose that IRAS2A VLA2 is the driving source of the East-West outflow and a true companion to IRAS2A VLA1, whereas IRAS2A MM2 and MM3 may not be protostellar.
  • We present sub-arcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ~60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales of ~0.1". A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M_earth, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle "trap") located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.
  • We present dust continuum observations of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the pre-main sequence star AS 209, spanning more than an order of magnitude in wavelength from 0.88 to 9.8 mm. The disk was observed with sub-arcsecond angular resolution (0.2"-0.5") to investigate radial variations in its dust properties. At longer wavelengths, the disk emission structure is notably more compact, providing model-independent evidence for changes in the grain properties across the disk. We find that physical models which reproduce the disk emission require a radial dependence of the dust opacity \kappa_{\nu}. Assuming that the observed wavelength-dependent structure can be attributed to radial variations in the dust opacity spectral index (\beta), we find that \beta(R) increases from \beta<0.5 at \sim20 AU to \beta>1.5 for R>80 AU, inconsistent with a constant value of \beta\ across the disk (at the 10\sigma\ level). Furthermore, if radial variations of \kappa_{\nu} are caused by particle growth, we find that the maximum size of the particle-size distribution (a_{max}) increases from sub-millimeter-sized grains in the outer disk (R>70 AU) to millimeter and centimeter-sized grains in the inner disk regions (R< 70 AU). We compare our observational constraint on a_{max}(R) with predictions from physical models of dust evolution in proto-planetary disks. For the dust composition and particle-size distribution investigated here, our observational constraints on a_{max}(R) are consistent with models where the maximum grain size is limited by radial drift.
  • We present a high angular resolution millimeter-wave dust continuum imaging survey of circumstellar material associated with individual components of 23 multiple star systems in the Taurus-Auriga young cluster. Combined with previous measurements, these new data permit a comprehensive look at how millimeter luminosity (a tracer of disk mass) relates to the separation and mass of a stellar companion. Approximately one third (28-37%) of individual stars in multiples have detectable millimeter emission, a rate half that for single stars (~62%). There is a strong correlation between the luminosity and projected separation (a_p) of a stellar pair. Wide pairs (a_p > 300 AU) have a similar luminosity distribution as single stars, medium pairs (a_p ~ 30-300 AU) are a factor of 5 fainter, and close pairs (a_p < 30 AU) are ~ 5 times fainter yet (aside from a small population of bright circumbinary disks). In most cases, the emission is dominated by a disk around the primary (or a wide tertiary in triples), but there is no clear relationship between luminosity and stellar mass ratio. A direct comparison of resolved disk sizes with predictions from tidal truncation models yields mixed results; some disks are larger than expected given their companion separations. We suggest that the presence of a stellar companion impacts disk properties at a level comparable to the internal evolution mechanisms operating in isolated systems, with both the multiple star formation process itself and star-disk tidal interactions likely playing important roles in the evolution of disk material. From the perspective of the mass content of the disk, we expect that (giant) planet formation is inhibited around the components of close pairs or secondaries, but should be as likely as for single stars around the primaries (or wide tertiaries in hierarchical triples) in more widely-separated multiple star systems.
  • We present the results of a systematic search in approximately 14 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor data for evidence of periodicities not reported by Wen et al. (2006). Two variations of the commonly used Fourier analysis search method have been employed to achieve significant improvements in sensitivity. The use of these methods and the accumulation of additional data have resulted in the detection of the signatures of the orbital periods of eight low-mass X-ray binary systems and of ten high-mass X-ray binaries not listed in the tables of Wen et al.
  • Results of observations of the Galactic bulge X-ray source GX 9+9 by the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) and Proportional Counter Array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer are presented. The ASM results show that the 4.19 hour X-ray periodicity first reported by Hertz and Wood in 1987 was weak or not detected for most of the mission prior to late 2004, but then became strong and remained strong for approximately 2 years after which it weakened considerably. When the modulation at the 4.19 hour period is strong, it appears in folded light curves as an intensity dip over slightly less than 30% of a cycle and is distinctly nonsinusoidal. A number of PCA observations of GX 9+9 were performed before the appearance of strong modulation; two were performed in 2006 during the epoch of strong modulation. Data obtained from the earlier PCA observations yield at best limited evidence of the presence of phase-dependent intensity changes, while the data from the later observations confirm the presence of flux minima with depths and phases compatible with those apparent in folded ASM light curves. Light curves from a Chandra observation of GX 9+9 performed in the year 2000 prior to the start of strong modulation show the possible presence of shallow dips at the predicted times. Optical observations performed in 2006 while the X-ray modulation was strong do not show an increase in the degree of modulation at the 4.19 hour period. Implications of the changes in modulation strength in X-rays and other observational results are considered.