• Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials emerge in recent years as a new platform to host novel electronic, optical or excitonic physics and develop unprecedented nanoelectronic and energy applications. By definition, these materials are strongly anisotropic between within the basal plane and cross the plane. The structural and property anisotropies inside their basal plane, however, are much less investigated. Herein, we report a rare chemical form of arsenic, called black-arsenic (b-As), as an extremely anisotropic layered semiconductor. We have performed systematic characterization on the structural, electronic, thermal and electrical properties of b-As single crystals, with particular focus on its anisotropies along two in-plane principle axes, armchair (AC) and zigzag (ZZ). Our analysis shows that b-As exhibits higher or comparable electronic, thermal and electric transport anisotropies between the AC and ZZ directions than any other known 2D crystals. Such extreme in-plane anisotropies are able to potentially implement novel ideas for scientific research and device applications.
  • Our understanding of correlated electron systems is vexed by the complexity of their interactions. Heavy fermion compounds are archetypal examples of this physics, leading to exotic properties that weave together magnetism, superconductivity and strange metal behavior. The Kondo semimetal CeSb is an unusual example where different channels of interaction not only coexist, but their physical signatures are coincident, leading to decades of debate about the microscopic picture describing the interactions between the $f$ moments and the itinerant electron sea. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we resonantly enhance the response of the Ce$f$-electrons across the magnetic transitions of CeSb and find there are two distinct modes of interaction that are simultaneously active, but on different kinds of carriers. This study is a direct visualization of how correlated systems can reconcile the coexistence of different modes on interaction - by separating their action in momentum space, they allow their coexistence in real space.
  • We present the crystal structure, electronic structure, and transport properties of the material YbMnSb$_2$, a candidate system for the investigation of Dirac physics in the presence of magnetic order. Our measurements reveal that this system is a low-carrier-density semimetal with a 2D Fermi surface arising from a Dirac dispersion, consistent with the predictions of density functional theory calculations of the antiferromagnetic system. The low temperature resistivity is very large, suggesting scattering in this system is highly efficient at dissipating momentum despite its Dirac-like nature.
  • Electrons in materials with linear dispersion behave as massless Weyl- or Dirac-quasiparticles, and continue to intrigue physicists due to their close resemblance to elusive ultra-relativistic particles as well as their potential for future electronics. Yet the experimental signatures of Weyl-fermions are often subtle and indirect, in particular if they coexist with conventional, massive quasiparticles. Here we report a large anomaly in the magnetic torque of the Weyl semi-metal NbAs upon entering the "quantum limit" state in high magnetic fields, where topological corrections to the energy spectrum become dominant. The quantum limit torque displays a striking change in sign, signaling a reversal of the magnetic anisotropy that can be directly attributed to the topological properties of the Weyl semi-metal. Our results establish that anomalous quantum limit torque measurements provide a simple experimental method to identify Weyl- and Dirac- semi-metals.