• Collective responses of localized surface plasmon resonances, known as surface lattice resonances (SLRs) in metal nanoparticle arrays, can lead to high quality factors (~100), large local-field enhancements and strong light-matter interactions. SLRs have found many applications in linear optics, but little work of the influence of SLRs on nonlinear optics has been reported. Here we show how SLRs could be utilized to enhance nonlinear optical interactions. We devote special attention to the sum-frequency, difference-frequency, and third-harmonic generation processes because of their potential for the realization of novel sources of light. We also demonstrate how such arrays could be engineered to enhance higher-order nonlinear optical interactions through cascaded nonlinear processes. In particular, we demonstrate how the efficiency of third-harmonic generation could be engineered via cascaded second-order responses.
  • Quantum key distribution is on the verge of real world applications, where perfectly secure information can be distributed among multiple parties. Several quantum cryptographic protocols have been theoretically proposed and independently realized in different experimental conditions. Here, we develop an experimental platform based on high-dimensional orbital angular momentum states of single photons that enables implementation of multiple quantum key distribution protocols with a single experimental apparatus. Our versatile approach allows us to experimentally survey different classes of quantum key distribution techniques, such as the 1984 Bennett & Brassard (BB84), tomographic protocols including the six-state and the Singapore protocol, and a recently introduced differential phase shift (Chau15) protocol. This enables us to experimentally compare the performance of these techniques and discuss their benefits and deficiencies in terms of noise tolerance in different dimensions. Our analysis gives an overview of the available quantum key distribution protocols for photonic orbital angular momentum and highlights the benefits of the presented schemes for different implementations and channel conditions.
  • Quantum communication has been successfully implemented in optical fibres and through free-space [1-3]. Fibre systems, though capable of fast key rates and low quantum bit error rates (QBERs), are impractical in communicating with destinations without an established fibre link [4]. Free-space quantum channels can overcome such limitations and reach long distances with the advent of satellite-to-ground links [5-8]. Shorter line-of-sight free-space links have also been realized for intra-city conditions [2, 9]. However, turbulence, resulting from local fluctuations in refractive index, becomes a major challenge by adding errors and losses [10]. Recently, an interest in investigating the possibility of underwater quantum channels has arisen, which could provide global secure communication channels among submersibles and boats [11-13]. Here, we investigate the effect of turbulence on an underwater quantum channel using twisted photons in outdoor conditions. We study the effect of turbulence on transmitted QBERs, and compare different QKD protocols in an underwater quantum channel showing the feasibility of high-dimensional encoding schemes. Our work may open the way for secure high-dimensional quantum communication between submersibles, and provides important input for potential submersibles-to-satellite quantum communication.
  • The Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes constitute a complete basis set for representing the transverse structure of a {paraxial} photon field in free space. Earlier workers have shown how to construct a device for sorting a photon according to its azimuthal LG mode index, which describes the orbital angular momentum (OAM) carried by the field. In this paper we propose and demonstrate a mode sorter based on the fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) to efficiently decompose the optical field according to its radial profile. We experimentally characterize the performance of our implementation by separating individual radial modes as well as superposition states. The reported scheme can, in principle, achieve unit efficiency and thus can be suitable for applications that involve quantum states of light. This approach can be readily combined with existing OAM mode sorters to provide a complete characterization of the transverse profile of the optical field.
  • We show that standard approximations in nonlinear optics are violated for situations involving a small value of the linear refractive index. Consequently, the conventional equation for the intensity-dependent refractive index, $n(I) = n_0 + n_2 I$, becomes inapplicable in epsilon-near-zero and low-index media, even in the presence of only third-order effects. For the particular case of indium tin oxide, we find that the $\chi^{(3)}$, $\chi^{(5)}$ and $\chi^{(7)}$ contributions to refraction eclipse the linear term; thus, the nonlinear response can no longer be interpreted as a perturbation in these materials. Although the response is non-perturbative, we find no evidence that the power series expansion of the material polarization diverges.
  • Slow light propagation in structured materials is a highly promising approach for realizing on-chip integrated photonic devices based on enhanced optical nonlinearities. One of the most successful research avenues consists in engineering the band dispersion of light-guiding photonic crystal (PC) structures. The primary goal of such devices is to achieve slow-light operation over the largest possible bandwidth, with large group index, minimal index dispersion, and constant transmission spectrum. Here, we report on the experimental demonstration of to date record high GBP in silicon-based coupled-cavity waveguides (CCWs) operating at telecom wavelengths. Our results rely on novel CCW designs, optimized using a genetic algorithm, and refined nanofabrication processes.
  • Caustics are natural phenomena in which nature concentrates the energy of waves. Although, they are known mostly in optics, caustics are intrinsic to all wave phenomena. For example, studies show that fluctuations in the profile of an ocean floor can generate random caustics and focus the energy of tsunami waves. Caustics share many similarities to rogue waves, as they both exhibit heavy-tailed distribution, i.e. an overpopulation of large events. Linear Schr\"odinger-type equations are usually used to explain the wave dynamics of caustics. However, in that the wave amplitude increases dramatically in caustics, nonlinearity is inevitable in many systems. In this Letter, we investigate the effect of nonlinearity on the formation of optical caustics. We show experimentally that, in contrast to linear systems, even small phase fluctuations can generate strong caustics upon nonlinear propagation. We simulated our experiment based on the nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation (NLSE) with Kerr-type nonlinearity, which describes the wave dynamics not only in optics, but also in some other physical systems such as oceans. Therefore, our results may also aid our understanding of ocean phenomena.
  • In both light optics and electron optics, the amplitude of a wave scattered by an object is an observable that is usually recorded in the form of an intensity distribution in a real space image or a diffraction image. In contrast, retrieval of the phase of a scattered wave is a well-known challenge, which is usually approached by interferometric or numerical methods. In electron microscopy, as a result of constraints in the lens setup, it is particularly difficult to retrieve the phase of a diffraction image. Here, we use a defocused beam generated by a nanofabricated hologram to form a reference wave that can be interfered with a diffracted beam. This setup provides an extended interference region with the sample wavefunction in the Fraunhofer plane. As a case study, we retrieve the phase of an electron vortex beam. Beyond this specific example, the approach can be used to retrieve the wavefronts of diffracted beams from a wide range of samples.
  • Induced coherence in parametric down-conversion between two coherently pumped nonlinear crystals that share a common idler mode can be used as an imaging technique. Based on the interference between the two signal modes of the crystals, an image can be reconstructed. By obtaining an expression for the interference pattern that is valid in both the low- and the high-gain regimes of parametric down-conversion, we show how the coherence of the light emitted by the two crystals can be controlled. With our comprehensive analysis we provide deeper insight into recent discussions about the application of induced coherence to imaging in different regimes. Moreover, we propose a scheme for optimizing the visibility of the interference pattern so that it directly corresponds to the degree of coherence of the light generated in the two crystals. We find that this scheme leads in the high-gain regime to a visibility arbitrarily close to unity.
  • Photons that are entangled or correlated in orbital angular momentum have been extensively used for remote sensing, object identification and imaging. It has recently been demonstrated that intensity fluctuations give rise to the formation of correlations in the orbital angular momentum components and angular positions of random light. Here, we demonstrate that the spatial signatures and phase information of an object, with rotational symmetries, can be identified using classical orbital angular momentum correlations in random light. The Fourier components imprinted in the digital spiral spectrum of the object, measured through intensity correlations, unveil its spatial and phase information. Sharing similarities with conventional compressive sensing protocols that exploit sparsity to reduce the number of measurements required to reconstruct a signal, our technique allows sensing of an object with fewer measurements than other schemes that use pixel-by-pixel imaging. One remarkable advantage of our technique is the fact that it does not require the preparation of fragile quantum states of light and works at both low- and high-light levels. In addition, our technique is robust against environmental noise, a fundamental feature of any realistic scheme for remote sensing.
  • The need to increase data transfer rates constitutes a key challenge in modern information-driven societies. Taking advantage of the transverse spatial modes of light to encode more information is a promising avenue for both classical and quantum photonics. However, to ease access to the encoded information, it is essential to be able to sort spatial modes into different output channels. Here, we introduce a novel way to customize the sorting of arbitrary spatial light modes. Our method relies on the high degree of control over random scattering processes by preshaping of the phase structure of the incident light. We demonstrate experimentally that various sets of modes, irrespective of their specific modal structure, can be transformed to any output channel arrangement. Thus, our method enables full access to all of the information encoded in the transverse structure of the field, for example, azimuthal and radial modes. We also demonstrate that coherence is retained in this complex mode transformation, which opens up applications in quantum and classical information science.
  • Free electrons with a helical phase front, referred to as "twisted" electrons, possess an orbital angular momentum (OAM) and, hence, a quantized magnetic dipole moment along their propagation direction. This intrinsic magnetic moment can be used to probe material properties. Twisted electrons thus have numerous potential applications in materials science. Measuring this quantity often relies on a series of projective measurements that subsequently change the OAM carried by the electrons. In this Letter, we propose a nondestructive way of measuring an electron beam's OAM through the interaction of this associated magnetic dipole with a conductive loop. Such an interaction results in the generation of induced currents within the loop, which are found to be directly proportional to the electron's OAM value. Moreover, the electron experiences no OAM variations and only minimal energy losses upon the measurement, and, hence, the nondestructive nature of the proposed technique.
  • Probabilistic amplification through photon addition, at the output of an Mach-Zehnder interferometer is discussed for a coherent input state. When a metric of signal to noise ratio is considered, nondeterministic, noiseless amplification of a coherent state shows improvement over a standard coherent state, for the general addition of $m$ photons. The efficiency of realizable implementation of photon addition is also considered and shows how the collected statistics of a post selected state, depend on this efficiency. We also consider the effects of photon loss and inefficient detectors.
  • Light beams with orbital angular momentum (OAM) are convenient carriers of quantum information. They can be also used for imparting rotational motion to particles and provide high resolution in imaging. Due to the conservation of OAM in parametric down-conversion (PDC), signal and idler photons generated at low gain have perfectly anti-correlated OAM values. It is interesting to study the OAM properties of high-gain PDC, where the same OAM modes can be populated with large, but correlated, numbers of photons. Here we investigate the OAM spectrum of high-gain PDC and show that the OAM mode content can be controlled by varying the pump power and the configuration of the source. In our experiment, we use a source consisting of two nonlinear crystals separated by an air gap. We discuss the OAM properties of PDC radiation emitted by this source and suggest possible modifications.
  • In an effort to challenge the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, Karl Popper proposed an experiment involving spatially separated entangled particles. In this experiment, one of the particles passes through a very narrow slit, and thereby its position becomes well-defined. This particle therefore diffracts into a large divergence angle; this effect can be understood as a consequence of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Popper further argued that its entangled partner would become comparably localized in position, and that, according to his understanding of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, the \qo{mere knowledge} of the position of this particle would cause it also to diffract into a large divergence angle. Popper recognized that such behaviour could violate the principle of causality in that the slit could be removed and the partner particle would be expected to respond instantaneously. Popper thus concluded that it was most likely the case that in an actual experiment the partner photon would not undergo increased diffractive spreading and thus that the Copenhagen interpretation is incorrect. Here, we report and analyze the results of an implementation of Popper's proposal. We find that the partner beam does not undergo increased diffractive spreading. Our work resolves many of the open questions involving Popper's proposal, and it provides further insight into the nature of entanglement and its relation to the uncertainty principle of correlated particles.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises information-theoretically secure communication, and is already on the verge of commercialization. Thus far, different QKD protocols have been proposed theoretically and implemented experimentally [1, 2]. The next step will be to implement high-dimensional protocols in order to improve noise resistance and increase the data rate [3-7]. Hitherto, no experimental verification of high-dimensional QKD in the single-photon regime has been conducted outside of the laboratory. Here, we report the realization of such a single-photon QKD system in a turbulent free-space link of 0.3 km over the city of Ottawa, taking advantage of both the spin and orbital angular momentum photonic degrees of freedom. This combination of optical angular momenta allows us to create a 4-dimensional state [8]; wherein, using a high-dimensional BB84 protocol [3, 4], a quantum bit error rate of 11\% was attained with a corresponding secret key rate of 0.65 bits per sifted photon. While an error rate of 5\% with a secret key rate of 0.43 bits per sifted photon is achieved for the case of 2-dimensional structured photons. Even through moderate turbulence without active wavefront correction, it is possible to securely transmit information carried by structured photons, opening the way for intra-city high-dimensional quantum communications under realistic conditions.
  • Weak value amplification (WVA) is a technique in which one can magnify the apparent strength of a measurement signal. Some have claimed that WVA can outperform more conventional measurement schemes in parameter estimation. Nonetheless, a significant body of theoretical work has challenged this perspective, suggesting WVA to be fundamentally sub-optimal. Optimal measurements may not be practical, however. Two practical considerations that have been conjectured to afford a benefit to WVA over conventional measurement are certain types of noise and detector saturation. Here, we report a theoretical study of the role of saturation and pixel noise in WVA-based measurement, in which we carry out a Bayesian analysis of the Fisher information available using a saturable, pixelated, digitized, and/or noisy detector. We draw two conclusions: first, that saturation alone does not confer an advantage to the WVA approach over conventional measurement, and second, that WVA can outperform conventional measurement when saturation is combined with intrinsic pixel noise and/or digitization.
  • Recently, we showed experimentally that light carrying orbital angular momentum experiences a slight subluminality under free-space propagation [1]. We thank Saari [2] for pointing out an apparent discrepancy between our theoretical results and the well-known results for the simple case of Laguerre-Gauss modes. In this reply, we note that the resolution of this apparent discrepancy is the distinction between Laguerre-Gauss modes and Hypergeometric-Gauss modes, which were used in our experiment and in our theoretical analysis, which gives rise to different subluminal effects.
  • The validity of the superposition principle and of Born's rule are well-accepted tenants of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly, it has recently been predicted that the intensity pattern formed in a three-slit experiment is seemingly in contradiction with the predictions of the most conventional form of the superposition principle when exotic looped trajectories are taken into account. However, the probability of observing such paths is typically very small and thus rendering them extremely difficult to measure. In this work, we confirm the validity of Born's rule and present the first experimental observation of these exotic trajectories as additional paths for the light by directly measuring their contribution to the formation of optical interference fringes. We accomplish this by enhancing the electromagnetic near-fields in the vicinity of the slits through the excitation of surface plasmons. This process effectively increases the probability of occurrence of these exotic trajectories, demonstrating that they are related to the near-field component of the photon's wavefunction.
  • Bright squeezed vacuum, a promising tool for quantum information, can be generated by high-gain parametric down-conversion. However, its frequency and angular spectra are typically quite broad, which is undesirable for applications requiring single-mode radiation. We tailor the frequency spectrum of high-gain parametric down-conversion using an SU(1,1) interferometer consisting of two nonlinear crystals with a dispersive medium separating them. The dispersive medium allows us to select a narrow band of the frequency spectrum to be exponentially amplified by high-gain parametric amplification. The frequency spectrum is thereby narrowed from (56.5 +- 0.1) to (1.22 +- 0.02) THz and, in doing so, the number of frequency modes is reduced from approximately 50 to 1.82 +- 0.02. Moreover, this method provides control and flexibility over the spectrum of the generated light through the timing of the pump.
  • We propose a method for directly producing radially and azimuthally polarized photon pairs through spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC). This method constitutes a novel geometry for SPDC, in which a radially polarized Bessel-Gauss pump beam is directed into a nonlinear crystal, with the central propagation direction parallel to the crystal axis. The phasematching conditions are controlled by changing the opening angle of the pump beam; as the crystal axis cannot be tuned, we refer to this process as super-critical phasematching. We model and plot the spatial and polarization output distributions for Type-I and Type-II super-critical phasematching.
  • Quantum complementarity states that particles, e.g. electrons, can exhibit wave-like properties such as diffraction and interference upon propagation. \textit{Electron waves} defined by a helical wavefront are referred to as twisted electrons~\cite{uchida:10,verbeeck:10,mcmorran:11}. These electrons are also characterised by a quantized and unbounded magnetic dipole moment parallel to their propagation direction, as they possess a net charge of $-|e|$~\cite{bliokh:07}. When interacting with magnetic materials, the wavefunctions of twisted electrons are inherently modified~\cite{lloyd:12b,schattschneider:14a,asenjo:14}. Such variations therefore motivate the need to analyze electron wavefunctions, especially their wavefronts, in order to obtain information regarding the material's structure~\cite{harris:15}. Here, we propose, design, and demonstrate the performance of a device for measuring an electron's azimuthal wavefunction, i.e. its orbital angular momentum (OAM) content. Our device consists of nanoscale holograms designed to introduce astigmatism onto the electron wavefunctions and spatially separate its phase components. We sort pure and superposition OAM states of electrons ranging within OAM values of $-10$ and $10$. We employ the device to analyze the OAM spectrum of electrons having been affected by a micron-scale magnetic dipole, thus establishing that, with a midfield optical configuration, our sorter can be an instrument for nano-scale magnetic spectroscopy.
  • Converting spin angular momentum to orbital angular momentum has been shown to be a practical and efficient method for generating optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum and possessing a space-varying polarized field. Here, we present novel liquid crystal devices for tailoring the wavefront of optical beams through the Pancharatnam-Berry phase concept. We demonstrate the versatility of these devices by generating an extensive range of optical beams such as beams carrying $\pm200$ units of orbital angular momentum along with Bessel, Airy and Ince-Gauss beams. We characterize both the phase and the polarization properties of the generated beams, confirming our devices' performance.
  • We study the nonlinear optical propagation of two different classes of space-varying polarized light beams -- radially symmetric vector beams and Poincar\'e beams with lemon and star topologies -- in a rubidium vapour cell. Unlike Laguerre-Gauss and other types of beams that experience modulational instabilities, we observe that their propagation is not marked by beam breakup while still exhibiting traits such as nonlinear confinement and self-focusing. Our results suggest that by tailoring the spatial structure of the polarization, the effects of nonlinear propagation can be effectively controlled. These findings provide a novel approach to transport high-power light beams in nonlinear media with controllable distortions to their spatial structure and polarization properties.
  • The possibility of focusing light to an ever tighter spot has important implications for many applications and fields of optics research, such as nano-optics and plasmonics, laser-scanning microscopy, optical data storage and many more. The size of lateral features of the field at the focus depends on several parameters, including the numerical aperture of the focusing system, but also the wavelength and polarization, phase and intensity distribution of the input beam. Here, we study the smallest achievable focal feature sizes of coherent superpositions of two co-propagating beams carrying opposite orbital angular momentum. We investigate the feature sizes for this class of beams not only in the scalar limit, but also use a fully vectorial treatment to discuss the case of tight focusing. Both our numerical simulations and our experimental results confirm that lateral feature sizes considerably smaller than those of a tightly focused Gaussian light beam can be observed. These findings may pave the way for improving the resolution of imaging systems or may find applications in nano-optics experiments.