• Assigning a satisfactory truly concurrent semantics to Petri nets with confusion and distributed decisions is a long standing problem, especially if one wants to resolve decisions by drawing from some probability distribution. Here we propose a general solution based on a recursive, static decomposition of (occurrence) nets in loci of decision, called structural branching cells (s-cells). Each s-cell exposes a set of alternatives, called transactions. Our solution transforms a given Petri net into another net whose transitions are the transactions of the s-cells and whose places are those of the original net, with some auxiliary structure for bookkeeping. The resulting net is confusion-free, and thus conflicting alternatives can be equipped with probabilistic choices, while nonintersecting alternatives are purely concurrent and their probability distributions are independent. The validity of the construction is witnessed by a tight correspondence with the recursively stopped configurations of Abbes and Benveniste. Some advantages of our approach are that: i) s-cells are defined statically and locally in a compositional way; ii) our resulting nets faithfully account for concurrency.
  • Event structures are a widely accepted model of concurrency. In a seminal paper by Nielsen, Plotkin and Winskel, they are used to establish a bridge between the theory of domains and the approach to concurrency proposed by Petri. A basic role is played by an unfolding construction that maps (safe) Petri nets into a subclass of event structures where each event has a uniquely determined set of causes, called prime event structures, which in turn can be identified with their domain of configurations. At a categorical level, this is nicely formalised by Winskel as a chain of coreflections. Contrary to prime event structures, general event structures allow for the presence of disjunctive causes, i.e., events can be enabled by distinct minimal sets of events. In this paper, we extend the connection between Petri nets and event structures in order to include disjunctive causes. In particular, we show that, at the level of nets, disjunctive causes are well accounted for by persistent places. These are places where tokens, once generated, can be used several times without being consumed and where multiple tokens are interpreted collectively, i.e., their histories are inessential. Generalising the work on ordinary nets, Petri nets with persistence are related to a new class of event structures, called locally connected, by means of a chain of coreflection relying on an unfolding construction.
  • In this paper we revisit some pioneering efforts to equip Petri nets with compact operational models for expressing causality. The models we propose have a bisimilarity relation and a minimal representative for each equivalence class, and they can be fully explained as coalgebras on a presheaf category on an index category of partial orders. First, we provide a set-theoretic model in the form of a a causal case graph, that is a labeled transition system where states and transitions represent markings and firings of the net, respectively, and are equipped with causal information. Most importantly, each state has a poset representing causal dependencies among past events. Our first result shows the correspondence with behavior structure semantics as proposed by Trakhtenbrot and Rabinovich. Causal case graphs may be infinitely-branching and have infinitely many states, but we show how they can be refined to get an equivalent finitely-branching model. In it, states are equipped with symmetries, which are essential for the existence of a minimal, often finite-state, model. The next step is constructing a coalgebraic model. We exploit the fact that events can be represented as names, and event generation as name generation. Thus we can apply the Fiore-Turi framework: we model causal relations as a suitable category of posets with action labels, and generation of new events with causal dependencies as an endofunctor on this category. Then we define a well-behaved category of coalgebras. Our coalgebraic model is still infinite-state, but we exploit the equivalence between coalgebras over a class of presheaves and History Dependent automata to derive a compact representation, which is equivalent to our set-theoretical compact model. Remarkably, state reduction is automatically performed along the equivalence.
  • A quite flourishing research thread in the recent literature on component-based systems is concerned with the algebraic properties of different classes of connectors. In a recent paper, an algebra of stateless connectors was presented that consists of five kinds of basic connectors, namely symmetry, synchronization, mutual exclusion, hiding and inaction, plus their duals, and it was shown how they can be freely composed in series and in parallel to model sophisticated 'glues'. In this paper we explore the expressiveness of stateful connectors obtained by adding one-place buffers or unbounded buffers to the stateless connectors. The main results are: i) we show how different classes of connectors exactly correspond to suitable classes of Petri nets equipped with compositional interfaces, called nets with boundaries; ii) we show that the difference between strong and weak semantics in stateful connectors is reflected in the semantics of nets with boundaries by moving from the classic step semantics (strong case) to a novel banking semantics (weak case), where a step can be executed by taking some 'debit' tokens to be given back during the same step; iii) we show that the corresponding bisimilarities are congruences (w.r.t. composition of connectors in series and in parallel); iv) we show that suitable monoidality laws, like those arising when representing stateful connectors in the tile model, can nicely capture concurrency (in the sense of step semantics) aspects; and v) as a side result, we provide a basic algebra, with a finite set of symbols, out of which we can compose all P/T nets with boundaries, fulfilling a long standing quest.
  • This volume contains the pre-proceedings of ICE'11, the 4th Interaction and Concurrency Experience workshop, which was held in Reykjavik, Iceland on the 9th of June 2011 as a satellite event of DisCoTec'11. The topic of ICE'11 was Reliable and Contract-based Interaction. Reliable interactions are, e.g., those enjoying suitable logical, behavioural, or security properties, or adhering to certain QoS standards. Contract-based interactions are, e.g., those where the interacting entities are committed to give certain guarantees whenever certain assumptions are met by their operating environment. The ICE procedure for paper selection allows for PC members to interact, anonymously, with authors. During the review phase, each submitted paper is published on a Wiki and associated with a discussion forum whose access is restricted to the authors and to all the PC members not declaring a conflict of interests. The PC members post comments and questions that the authors reply to. Each paper was reviewed by four PC members, and altogether 8 papers (out of 12) were accepted for publication. We were proud to host three invited talks by Rocco De Nicola (joint with PACO), Simon Gay and Prakash Panangaden, whose abstracts are included in this volume together with the regular papers.
  • This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd Interaction and Concurrency Experience (ICE 2010) workshop, which was held in Amsterdam, Netherlands on 10th of June 2010 as a satellite event of DisCoTec'10. Each year, the workshop focuses on a specific topic: the topic of ICE 2010 was Guaranteed Interactions, by which we mean, for example, guaranteeing safety, reactivity, quality of service or satisfaction of analysis hypotheses.
  • We apply to logic programming some recently emerging ideas from the field of reduction-based communicating systems, with the aim of giving evidence of the hidden interactions and the coordination mechanisms that rule the operational machinery of such a programming paradigm. The semantic framework we have chosen for presenting our results is tile logic, which has the advantage of allowing a uniform treatment of goals and observations and of applying abstract categorical tools for proving the results. As main contributions, we mention the finitary presentation of abstract unification, and a concurrent and coordinated abstract semantics consistent with the most common semantics of logic programming. Moreover, the compositionality of the tile semantics is guaranteed by standard results, as it reduces to check that the tile systems associated to logic programs enjoy the tile decomposition property. An extension of the approach for handling constraint systems is also discussed.