• Luminous high-redshift quasars can be used to probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the early universe because their UV light is absorbed by the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight. They help us to measure the neutral hydrogen fraction of the high-z universe, shedding light on the end of reionization epoch. In this paper, we present a discovery of a new quasar (PSO J006.1240+39.2219) at redshift $z=6.61\pm0.02$ from Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1. Including this quasar, there are nine quasars above $z>6.5$ up to date. The estimated continuum brightness is $M_\text{1450}$=$-25.96\pm0.08$. PSO J006.1240+39.2219 has a strong Ly~$\alpha$ emission compared with typical low-redshift quasars, but the measured near-zone region size is $R_\text{NZ}=3.2\pm1.1$ proper megaparsecs, which is consistent with other quasars at z$\sim$6.
  • During reionization, neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) imprints a damping wing absorption feature on the spectrum of high-redshift quasars. A detection of this signature provides compelling evidence for a significantly neutral Universe, and enables measurements of the hydrogen neutral fraction $x_{\rm HI}(z)$ at that epoch. Obtaining reliable quantitative constraints from this technique, however, is challenging due to stochasticity induced by the patchy inside-out topology of reionization, degeneracies with quasar lifetime, and the unknown unabsorbed quasar spectrum close to rest-frame Ly$\alpha$. We combine a large-volume semi-numerical simulation of reionization topology with 1D radiative transfer through high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the high-redshift Universe to construct models of quasar transmission spectra during reionization. Our state-of-the-art approach captures the distribution of damping wing strengths in biased quasar halos that should have reionized earlier, as well as the erosion of neutral gas in the quasar environment caused by its own ionizing radiation. Combining this detailed model with our new technique for predicting the quasar continuum and its associated uncertainty, we introduce a Bayesian statistical method to jointly constrain the neutral fraction of the Universe and the quasar lifetime from individual quasar spectra. We apply this methodology to the spectra of the two highest redshift quasars known, ULAS J1120+0641 and ULAS J1342+0928, and measured volume-averaged neutral fractions $\langle x_{\rm HI} \rangle(z=7.09)=0.48^{+0.26}_{-0.26}$ and $\langle x_{\rm HI} \rangle(z=7.54)=0.60^{+0.20}_{-0.23}$ (posterior medians and 68% credible intervals) when marginalized over quasar lifetimes of $10^3 \leq t_{\rm q} \leq 10^8$ years.
  • BL Lac objects emitting in the Very High Energy (VHE) regime are unique tools to peer into the properties of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). However, due to the typical absence of features in their spectra, the determination of their redshifts has proven challenging. In this work we exploit the superb spatial resolution delivered by the new Advanced Rayleigh guided Ground layer adaptive Optics System (ARGOS) at the Large Binocular Telescope to detect the host galaxy of HESS J1943+213, a VHE emitting BL Lac shining through the Galaxy. Deep H-band imaging collected during the ARGOS commissioning allowed us to separate the contribution of the nuclear emission and to unveil the properties of the host galaxy with unprecedented detail. The host galaxy is well fitted by a S\'ersic profile with index of n~2 and total magnitude of H~16.15 mag. Under the assumption that BL Lac host galaxies are standard candles, we infer a redshift of z~0.21. In the framework of the current model for the EBL, this value is in agreement with the observed dimming of the VHE spectrum due to the scatter of energetic photons on the EBL.
  • Measuring the proximity effect and the damping wing of intergalactic neutral hydrogen in quasar spectra during the epoch of reionization requires an estimate of the intrinsic continuum at rest-frame wavelengths $\lambda_{\rm rest}\sim1200$-$1260$ {\AA}. In contrast to previous works which used composite spectra with matched spectral properties or explored correlations between parameters of broad emission lines, we opted for a non-parametric predictive approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) to predict the intrinsic spectrum from the spectral properties at redder (i.e. unabsorbed) wavelengths. We decomposed a sample of $12764$ spectra of $z\sim2$-$2.5$ quasars from SDSS/BOSS into 10 red-side ($1280$ {\AA} $<\lambda_{\rm rest}<2900$ {\AA}) and 6 blue-side ($1180$ {\AA} $<\lambda_{\rm rest}<1280$ {\AA}) PCA basis spectra, and constructed a projection matrix to predict the blue-side coefficients from a fit to the red-side spectrum. We found that our method predicts the blue-side continuum with $\sim6$-$12\%$ precision and $\lesssim1\%$ bias by testing on the full training set sample. We then computed predictions for the blue-side continua of the two quasars currently known at $z>7$: ULAS J1120+0641 ($z=7.09$) and ULAS J1342+0928 ($z=7.54$). Both of these quasars are known to exhibit extreme emission line properties, so we individually calibrated the precision of the continuum predictions from similar quasars in the training set. We find that both $z>7$ quasars, and in particular ULAS J1342+0928, show signs of damping wing-like absorption at wavelengths redward of Ly$\alpha$.
  • We present a survey of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m line and underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission in a sample of 27 z>6 quasars using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at ~1" resolution. The [CII] line was significantly detected (at >5-sigma) in 23 sources (85%). We find typical line luminosities of $L_{\rm [CII]}=10^{9-10}$ L$_\odot$, and an average line width of ~385 km/s. The [CII]-to-far-infrared luminosity ratio ([CII]/FIR) in our sources span one order of magnitude, highlighting a variety of conditions in the star-forming medium. Four quasar host galaxies are clearly resolved in their [CII] emission on a few kpc scales. Basic estimates of the dynamical masses of the host galaxies give masses between $2\times10^{10}$ and $2\times10^{11}$ M$_\odot$, i.e., more than an order of magnitude below what is expected from local scaling relations, given the available limits on the masses of the central black holes ($>3\times10^8$ M$_\odot$, assuming Eddington-limited accretion). In stacked ALMA [CII] spectra of individual sources in our sample, we find no evidence of a deviation from a single Gaussian profile. The quasar luminosity does not strongly correlate with either the [CII] luminosity or equivalent width. This survey (with typical on-source integration times of 8 min) showcases the unparalleled sensitivity of ALMA at millimeter wavelengths, and offers a unique reference sample for the study of the first massive galaxies in the universe.
  • We present an extremely deep CO(1-0) observation of a confirmed $z=1.62$ galaxy cluster. We detect two spectroscopically confirmed cluster members in CO(1-0) with $S/N>5$. Both galaxies have log(${\cal M_{\star}}$/\msol)$>11$ and are gas rich, with ${\cal M}_{\rm mol}$/(${\cal M_{\star}}+{\cal M}_{\rm mol}$)$\sim 0.17-0.45$. One of these galaxies lies on the star formation rate (SFR)-${\cal M_{\star}}$ sequence while the other lies an order of magnitude below. We compare the cluster galaxies to other SFR-selected galaxies with CO measurements and find that they have CO luminosities consistent with expectations given their infrared luminosities. We also find that they have comparable gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFE) to what is expected from published field galaxy scaling relations. The galaxies are compact in their stellar light distribution, at the extreme end for all high redshift star-forming galaxies. However, their SFE is consistent with other field galaxies at comparable compactness. This is similar to two other sources selected in a blind CO survey of the HDF-N. Despite living in a highly quenched proto-cluster core, the molecular gas properties of these two galaxies, one of which may be in the processes of quenching, appear entirely consistent with field scaling relations between the molecular gas content, stellar mass, star formation rate, and redshift. We speculate that these cluster galaxies cannot have any further substantive gas accretion if they are to become members of the dominant passive population in $z<1$ clusters.
  • We utilize the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to search for extended Lyman-Alpha emission around the z~6.6 QSO J0305-3150. After carefully subtracting the point-spread-function, we reach a nominal 5-sigma surface brightness limit of SB = 1.9x10$^{-18}$ erg/s/cm$^2$/arcsec$^2$ over a 1 arcsec$^2$ aperture, collapsing 5 wavelength slices centered at the expected location of the redshifted Lyman-Alpha emission (i.e. at 9256 Ang.). Current data suggest the presence (5-sigma, accounting for systematics) of a Lyman-Alpha nebula that extends for 9 kpc around the QSO. This emission is displaced and redshifted by 155 km/s with respect to the location of the QSO host galaxy traced by the [CII] emission line. The total luminosity is L = 3.0x10$^{42}$ erg/s. Our analysis suggests that this emission is unlikely to rise from optically thick clouds illuminated by the ionizing radiation of the QSO. It is more plausible that the Lyman-Alpha emission is due to fluorescence of the highly ionized optically thin gas. This scenario implies a high hydrogen volume density of n$_H$ ~ 6 cm$^{-3}$. In addition, we detect a Lyman-Alpha emitter (LAE) in the immediate vicinity of the QSO: i.e., with a projected separation of 12.5 kpc and a line-of-sight velocity difference of 560 km/s. The luminosity of the LAE is L = 2.1x10$^{42}$ erg/s and its inferred star-formation-rate is SFR ~ 1.3 M$_\odot$/yr. The probability of finding such a close LAE is one order of magnitude above the expectations based on the QSO-galaxy cross-correlation function. This discovery is in agreement with a scenario where dissipative interactions favour the rapid build-up of super-massive black holes at early Cosmic times.
  • We present ALMA band 3 observations of the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [CI] 369micron emission lines in three of the highest redshift quasar host galaxies at 6.6<z<6.9. These measurements constitute the highest-redshift CO detections to date. The target quasars have previously been detected in [CII] 158micron emission and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum. We detect (spatially unresolved, at a resolution of >2", or >14kpc) CO emission in all three quasar hosts. In two sources, we detect the continuum emission around 400micron (rest-frame), and in one source we detect [CI] at low significance. We derive molecular gas reservoirs of (1-3)x10^10 M_sun in the quasar hosts, i.e. approximately only 10 times the mass of their central supermassive black holes. The extrapolated [CII]-to-CO(1-0) luminosity ratio is 2500-4200, consistent with measurements in galaxies at lower redshift. The detection of the [CI] line in one quasar host galaxy and the limit on the [CI] emission in the other two hosts enables a first characterization of the physical properties of the interstellar medium in z~7 quasar hosts. In the sources, the derived global CO/[CII]/[CI] line ratios are consistent with expectations from photodissociation regions (PDR), but not X-ray dominated regions (XDR). This suggest that quantities derived from the molecular gas and dust emission are related to ongoing star-formation activity in the quasar hosts, providing further evidence that the quasar hosts studied here harbor intense starbursts in addition to their active nucleus.
  • The existence of massive ($10^{11}$ solar masses) elliptical galaxies by redshift z~4 (when the Universe was 1.5 billion years old) necessitates the presence of galaxies with star-formation rates exceeding 100 solar masses per year at z>6 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of less than 1 billion years). Surveys have discovered hundreds of galaxies at these early cosmic epochs, but their star-formation rates are more than an order of magnitude lower. The only known galaxies with very high star-formation rates at z>6 are, with only one exception, the host galaxies of quasars, but these galaxies also host accreting supermassive (more than $10^9$ solar masses) black holes, which probably affect the properties of the galaxies. Here we report observations of an emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII] at a wavelength of 158 micrometres) in four galaxies at z>6 that are companions of quasars, with velocity offsets of less than 600 kilometers per second and linear offsets of less than 600 kiloparsecs. The discovery of these four galaxies was serendipitous; they are close to their companion quasars and appear bright in the far-infrared. On the basis of the [CII] measurements, we estimate star-formation rates in the companions of more than 100 solar masses per year. These sources are similar to the host galaxies of the quasars in [CII] brightness, linewidth and implied dynamical masses, but do not show evidence for accreting supermassive black holes. Similar systems have previously been found at lower redshift. We find such close companions in four out of twenty-five z>6 quasars surveyed, a fraction that needs to be accounted for in simulations. If they are representative of the bright end of the [CII] luminosity function, then they can account for the population of massive elliptical galaxies at z~4 in terms of cosmic space density.
  • We present ALMA detections of the [CI] 1-0, CO J=3-2, and CO J=4-3 emission lines, as well as the ALMA band 4 continuum for a compact star-forming galaxy (cSFG) at z=2.225, 3D-HST GS30274. As is typical for cSFGs, this galaxy has a stellar mass of $1.89 \pm 0.47\,\times 10^{11}\,\rm{M}_\odot$, with a star formation rate of $214\pm44\,\rm{M}_\odot\,\rm{yr}^{-1}$ putting it on the star-forming `main-sequence', but with an H-band effective radius of 2.5 kpc, making it much smaller than the bulk of `main-sequence' star-forming galaxies. The intensity ratio of the line detections yield an ISM density (~ 6 $\times 10^{4}\,\rm{cm}^{-3}$) and a UV-radiation field ( ~2 $\times 10^4\,\rm{G}_0$), similar to the values in local starburst and ultra-luminous infrared galaxy environments. A starburst phase is consistent with the short depletion times ($t_{\rm H2, dep} \leq 140$ Myr) we find using three different proxies for the H2 mass ([CI], CO, dust mass). This depletion time is significantly shorter than in more extended SFGs with similar stellar masses and SFRs. Moreover, the gas fraction of 3D-HST GS30274 is smaller than typically found in extended galaxies. We measure the CO and [CI] kinematics and find a FWHM line width of ~$750 \pm 41 $ km s$^{-1}$. The CO and [CI] FWHM are consistent with a previously measured H$\alpha$ FWHM for this source. The line widths are consistent with gravitational motions, suggesting we are seeing a compact molecular gas reservoir. A previous merger event, as suggested by the asymmetric light profile, may be responsible for the compact distribution of gas and has triggered a central starburst event. This event gives rise to the starburst-like ISM properties and short depletion times. The centrally located and efficient star formation is quickly building up a dense core of stars, responsible for the compact distribution of stellar light in 3D-HST GS30274.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [CII] fine structure line and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission in J1120+0641, the most distant quasar currently known (z=7.1). We also present observations targeting the CO(2-1), CO(7-6) and [CI] 369 micron lines in the same source obtained at the VLA and PdBI. We find a [CII] line flux of F_[CII]=1.11+/-0.10 Jy km/s and a continuum flux density of S_227GHz=0.53+/-0.04 mJy/beam, consistent with previous unresolved measurements. No other source is detected in continuum or [CII] emission in the field covered by ALMA (~25"). At the resolution of our ALMA observations (0.23", or 1.2 kpc, a factor ~70 smaller beam area compared to previous measurements), we find that the majority of the emission is very compact: a high fraction (~80%) of the total line and continuum flux is associated with a region 1-1.5 kpc in diameter. The remaining ~20% of the emission is distributed over a larger area with radius <4 kpc. The [CII] emission does not exhibit ordered motion on kpc-scales: applying the virial theorem yields an upper limit on the dynamical mass of the host galaxy of (4.3+/-0.9)x10^10 M_sun, only ~20x higher than the central black hole. The other targeted lines (CO(2-1), CO(7-6) and [CI]) are not detected, but the limits of the line ratios with respect to the [CII] emission imply that the heating in the quasar host is dominated by star formation, and not by the accreting black hole. The star-formation rate implied by the FIR continuum is 105-340 M_sun/yr, with a resulting star-formation rate surface density of ~100-350 M_sun/yr/kpc^2, well below the value for Eddington-accretion-limited star formation.
  • We present 90 mas (37 pc) resolution ALMA imaging of Arp 220 in the CO (1-0) line and continuum at $\lambda = 2.6$ mm. The internal gas distribution and kinematics of both galactic nuclei are well-resolved for the first time. In the West nucleus, the major gas and dust emission extends out to 0.2\arcsec radius (74 pc); the central resolution element shows a strong peak in the dust emission but a factor 3 dip in the CO line emission. In this nucleus, the dust is apparently optically thick ($\tau_{\rm 2.6mm} \sim1$) at $\lambda = 2.6$ mm with a dust brightness temperature $\sim147$ K. The column of ISM at this nucleus is $\rm N_{H2} \geq 2\times10^{26}$ cm$^{-2}$, corresponding to $\sim$900 gr cm$^{-2}$. The East nucleus is more elongated with radial extent 0.3\arcsec or $\sim111$ pc. The derived kinematics of the nuclear disks provide a good fit to the line profiles, yielding the emissivity distributions, the rotation curves and velocity dispersions. In the West nucleus, there is evidence of a central Keplerian component requiring a central mass of $8\times10^8$ \msun. The intrinsic widths of the emission lines are $\Delta \rm v (FWHM)$ = 250 (West) and 120 (East) \kms. Given the very short dissipation timescales for turbulence ($\lesssim10^5$ yrs), we suggest that the line widths may be due to semi-coherent motions within the nuclear disks. The symmetry of the nuclear disk structures is impressive -- implying the merger timescale is significantly longer than the rotation period of the disks.
  • We present a MUSE and KMOS dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z=0.28-1.65 (median redshift z=0.84). Our sample are representative of star-forming, main-sequence galaxies, with star-formation rates of SFR=0.1-30Mo/yr and stellar masses M=10^8-10^11Mo. For 49+/-4% of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24+/-3% are unresolved systems and 5+/-2% appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30kpc scales. The remaining 22+/-5% appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination corrected rotational velocities and show these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j*=J/M*\propto M^(2/3) but with a redshift evolution that scales as j*\propto M^{2/3}(1+z)^(-1). We identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disk stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum, log(j*/M^(2/3))>2.5, are the most stable, with Toomre Q=1.10+/-0.18, compared to Q=0.53+/-0.22 for galaxies with log(j*/M^(2/3))<2.5. At a fixed mass, the HST morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas disks: at z~1, massive galaxies that have disks with low specific angular momentum, appear to be globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular have evolved in to stable disks with spiral structures.
  • We present final statistics from a survey for intervening MgII absorption towards 100 quasars with emission redshifts between $z=3.55$ and $z=7.08$. Using infrared spectra from Magellan/FIRE, we detect 279 cosmological MgII absorbers, and confirm that the incidence rate of $W_r>0.3 \AA$ MgII absorption per comoving path length does not evolve measurably between $z=0.25$ and $z=7$. This is consistent with our detection of seven new MgII systems at $z>6$, a redshift range that was not covered in prior searches. Restricting to relatively strong MgII systems ($W_r>1$\AA), there is significant evidence for redshift evolution. These systems roughly double in number density between $z=0$ and $z=2$-$3$, but decline by an order of magnitude from this peak by $z\sim 6$. This evolution mirrors that of the global star formation rate density, which could reflect a connection between star formation feedback and strong MgII absorbers. We compared our results to the Illustris cosmological simulation at $z=2$-$4$ by assigning absorption to catalogued dark-matter halos and by direct extraction of spectra from the simulation volume. To reproduce our results using the halo catalogs, we require circumgalactic (CGM) MgII envelopes within halos of progressively smaller mass at earlier times. This occurs naturally if we define the lower integration cutoff using SFR rather than mass. MgII profiles calculated directly from the Illustris volume yield far too few strong absorbers. We argue that this arises from unresolved phase space structure of CGM gas, particularly from turbulent velocities on sub-mesh scales. The presence of CGM MgII at $z>6$-- just $\sim 250$ Myr after the reionization redshift implied by Planck--suggests that enrichment of intra-halo gas may have begun before the presumed host galaxies' stellar populations were mature and dynamically relaxed. [abridged]
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-$L_{\rm{}IR}$ envelope of the scatter in the $L_{\rm{}IR}-L'_{\rm{}CO}$ relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of $\sim$ 1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ($M_{\rm{}H2}$/$M_*$) is consistent with earlier measurements of main sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor $\sim$2-5$\times$ smaller than those based on CO. Accounting for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.
  • We make use of deep 1.2mm-continuum observations (12.7microJy/beam RMS) of a 1 arcmin^2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to probe dust-enshrouded star formation from 330 Lyman-break galaxies spanning the redshift range z=2-10 (to ~2-3 Msol/yr at 1sigma over the entire range). Given the depth and area of ASPECS, we would expect to tentatively detect 35 galaxies extrapolating the Meurer z~0 IRX-beta relation to z>~2 (assuming T_d~35 K). However, only 6 tentative detections are found at z>~2 in ASPECS, with just three at >3sigma. Subdividing z=2-10 galaxies according to stellar mass, UV luminosity, and UV-continuum slope and stacking the results, we only find a significant detection in the most massive (>10^9.75 Msol) subsample, with an infrared excess (IRX=L_{IR}/L_{UV}) consistent with previous z~2 results. However, the infrared excess we measure from our large selection of sub-L* (<10^9.75 Msol) galaxies is 0.11(-0.42)(+0.32) and 0.14(-0.14)(+0.15) at z=2-3 and z=4-10, respectively, lying below even an SMC IRX-beta relation (95% confidence). These results demonstrate the relevance of stellar mass for predicting the IR luminosity of z>~2 galaxies. We furthermore find that the evolution of the IRX-stellar mass relationship depends on the evolution of the dust temperature. If the dust temperature increases monotonically with redshift (as (1+z)^0.32) such that T_d~44-50 K at z>=4, current results are suggestive of little evolution in this relationship to z~6. We use these results to revisit recent estimates of the z>~3 SFR density. One less obvious implication is in interpreting the high Halpha EWs seen in z~5 galaxies: our results imply that star-forming galaxies produce Lyman-continuum photons at twice the efficiency (per unit UV luminosity) as implied in conventional models. Star-forming galaxies can then reionize the Universe, even if the escape fraction is <10%.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • Now that ALMA is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J=1-0 up to CO J=6-5 and [CII] at redshifts z=0-6. We find that: 1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [CII] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z<2.75; 2) we find that the CO and [CII] luminosity functions of galaxies increase from z = 6 to z = 4, remain relatively constant till z = 1 and rapidly decrease towards z = 0. The galaxies that are brightest in CO and [CII] are found at z~2; 3) the CO J=3-2 emission line is most favourable to study the CO luminosity and global H2 mass content of galaxies, because of its brightness and observability with currently available sub-mm and radio instruments; 4) the luminosity functions of high-J CO lines show stronger evolution than the luminosity functions of low-J CO lines; 5) our model barely reproduces the available constraints on the CO and [CII] luminosity function of galaxies at z>1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.
  • Two millimeter observations of the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster have detected a source that was consistent with the location of the lensed MACS1149-JD galaxy at z=9.6. A positive identification would have rendered this galaxy as the youngest dust forming galaxy in the universe. Follow up observation with the AzTEC 1.1 mm camera and the IRAM NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) at 1.3 mm have not confirmed this association. In this paper we show that the NOEMA observations associate the 2 mm source with [PCB2012] 2882 ([PCB2012] 2882 is the NED-searchable name for this source.), source number 2882 in the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) Cluster Lensing and Supernova (CLASH) catalog of MACS J1149.6+2223. This source, hereafter referred to as CLASH 2882, is a gravitationally lensed spiral galaxy at z=0.99. We combine the GISMO 2 mm and NOEMA 1.3 mm fluxes with other (rest frame) UV to far-IR observations to construct the full spectral energy distribution (SED) of this galaxy, and derive its star formation history, and stellar and interstellar dust content. The current star formation rate of the galaxy is 54/mu Msun yr-1, and its dust mass is about 5 10^7/mu Msun, where mu is the lensing magnification factor for this source, which has a mean value of 2.7. The inferred dust mass is higher than the maximum dust mass that can be produced by core collapse supernovae (CCSN) and evolved AGB stars. As with many other star forming galaxies, most of the dust mass in CLASH 2882 must have been accreted in the dense phases of the ISM.
  • We report the results of a search for large velocity width, low-intensity line wings - a commonly used signature of molecular outflows - in four low redshift (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) that appear to be dominated by star formation. The targets were drawn from a sample of fourteen such galaxies presented in Chung et al. (2011), who showed the stacked CO spectrum of the sample to exhibit 1000 km/s-wide line wings. We obtained sensitive, wide bandwidth imaging of our targets using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We detect each target at very high significance but do not find the claimed line wings in these four targets. Instead, we constrain the flux in the line wings to be only a few percent. Casting our results as mass outflow rates following Cicone et al. (2014) we show them to be consistent with a picture in which very high mass loading factors preferentially occur in systems with high AGN contributions to their bolometric luminosity. We identify one of our targets, IRAS05083 (VII Zw 31), as a candidate molecular outflow.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of a newly discovered compact group (CG), SDSS J0959+1259, based data from XMM-Newton, SDSS and the Calar Alto optical imager BUSCA. With a maximum velocity offset of 500 km s$^{-1}$, a mean redshift of 0.035, and a mean spatial extension of 480 kpc, this CG is exceptional in having the highest concentration of nuclear activity in the local Universe, established with a sensitivity limit L$_{X}>4\times $10$^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$ in 2--10 keV band and R-band magnitude $M_R < -19$. The group is composed of two type-2 Seyferts, one type-1 Seyfert, two LINERs and three star forming galaxies. Given the high X-ray luminosity of LINERs which reaches $\sim 10^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$, it is likely that they are also accretion driven, bringing the number of active nuclei in this group to to 5 out of 8 (AGN fraction of 60\%). The distorted shape of one member of the CG suggests that strong interactions are taking place among its galaxies through tidal forces. Therefore, this system represents a case study for physical mechanisms that trigger nuclear activity and star formation in CGs.
  • [abridged] The ALESS survey has followed-up a sample of 122 sub-millimeter sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South at 870um with ALMA, allowing to pinpoint the positions of sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) to 0.3'' and to find their precise counterparts at different wavelengths. This enabled the first compilation of the multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a statistically reliable survey of SMGs. In this paper, we present a new calibration of the MAGPHYS modelling code that is optimized to fit these UV-to-radio SEDs of z>1 star-forming galaxies using an energy balance technique to connect the emission from stellar populations, dust attenuation and dust emission in a physically consistent way. We derive statistically and physically robust estimates of the photometric redshifts and physical parameters for the ALESS SMGs. We find that they have a median stellar mass $M_\ast=(8.9\pm0.1)\times10^{10} M_\odot$, SFR$=280\pm70 M_\odot$/yr, overall V-band dust attenuation $A_V=1.9\pm0.2$ mag, dust mass $M_\rm{dust}=(5.6\pm1.0)\times10^8 M_\odot$, and average dust temperature Tdust~40 K. The average intrinsic SED of the ALESS SMGs resembles that of local ULIRGs in the IR range, but the stellar emission of our average SMG is brighter and bluer, indicating lower dust attenuation, possibly because they are more extended. We explore how the average SEDs vary with different parameters, and we provide a new set of SMG templates. To put the ALESS SMGs into context, we compare their stellar masses and SFRs with those of less actively star-forming galaxies at the same redshifts. At z~2, about half of the SMGs lie above the star-forming main sequence, while half are at the high-mass end of the sequence. At higher redshifts (z~3.5), the SMGs tend to have higher SFR and Mstar, but the fraction of SMGs that lie significantly above the main sequence decreases to less than a third.
  • Recently, the relation between the masses of the black hole ($M_{BH}$) and the host galaxy ($M_{host}$) in quasars has been probed down to the parameter space of $M_{BH}\sim10^8 M_\odot$ and $M_{host}\sim10^{11} M_\odot$ at z $<$ 0.5. In this study, we have investigated the $M_{BH}$ - $M_{host}$ log-linear relation for a sample of 37 quasars with low black hole masses ($10^7 M_\odot < M_{BH} < 10^{8.3} M_\odot$) at 0.5 $<$ z $<$ 1.0. The black hole masses were derived using virial mass estimates from SDSS optical spectra. For 25 quasars, we detected the presence of the host galaxy from deep near-infrared H-band imaging, whereas upper limits for the host galaxy luminosity (mass) were estimated for the 12 unresolved quasars. We combined our previous studies with the results from this work to create a sample of 89 quasars at z $<$ 1.0 having a large range of black hole masses ($10^7 M_\odot < M_{BH} < 10^{10} M_\odot$) and host galaxy masses ($10^{10} M_\odot < M_{host} < 10^{13} M_\odot$). Most of the quasars at the low mass end lie below the extrapolation of the local relation. This apparent break in the linearity of the entire sample is due to increasing fraction of disc-dominated host galaxies in the low-mass quasars. After correcting for the disc component, and considering only the bulge component, the bilinear regression for the entire quasar sample holds over 3.5 dex in both the black hole mass and the bulge mass, and is in very good agreement with the local relation. We advocate secular evolution of discs of galaxies being responsible for the relatively strong disc domination.
  • The peculiar QSO J0927+2943 shows multiple sets of emission lines in its optical spectrum. This signature has been interpreted as the relative motion between a black hole, either recoiling or bound in a binary system, and its host galaxy, or as a superposition of two galaxies along the line of sight. In order to test these scenarios, we have collected 2mm CO(2-1) observations using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, and optical images and spectroscopy at the Calar Alto observatory. Together with archival HST images, these data provide unique insights on the nature of this system. The recoiling/binary black hole scenarios are ruled out by the clear detection of a galactic-scale molecular gas reservoir at the same redshift of the QSO broad lines. The observations presented here also disfavour the superposition model, although with less constraints. Thus, the origin of the second, bright set of narrow emission lines in J0927+2943 is still unknown.