• PS16dtm was classified as a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) in a dwarf Seyfert 1 galaxy with low-mass black hole ($\sim10^6M\odot$) and has presented various intriguing photometric and spectra characteristics. Using the archival WISE and the newly released NEOWISE data, we found PS16dtm is experiencing a mid-infrared (MIR) flare which started $\sim11$ days before the first optical detection. Interpreting the MIR flare as a dust echo requires close pre-existing dust with a high covering factor, and suggests the optical flare may have brightened slowly for some time before it became bright detectable from the ground. More evidence is given at the later epochs. At the peak of the optical light curve, the new inner radius of the dust torus has grown to much larger size, a factor of 7 of the initial radius due to strong radiation field. At $\sim150$ days after the first optical detection, the dust temperature has dropped well below the sublimation temperature. Other peculiar spectral features shown by PS16dtm are the transient, prominent FeII emission lines and outflows indicated by broad absorption lines detected during the optical flare. Our model explains the enhanced FeII emission from iron newly released from the evaporated dust. The observed broad absorption line outflow could be explained by accelerated gas in the dust torus due to the radiation pressure.
  • We present the mid-infrared (MIR) light curves (LCs) of a tidal disruption event (TDE) candidate in the center of a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) F01004-2237 using archival {\it WISE} and {\it NEOWISE} data from 2010 to 2016. At the peak of the optical flare, F01004-2237 was IR quiescent. About three years later, its MIR fluxes have shown a steady increase, rising by 1.34 and 1.04 mag in $3.4$ and $4.6\mu$m up to the end of 2016. The host-subtracted MIR peak luminosity is $2-3\times10^{44}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$. We interpret the MIR LCs as an infrared echo, i.e. dust reprocessed emission of the optical flare. Fitting the MIR LCs using our dust model, we infer a dust torus of the size of a few parsecs at some inclined angle. The derived dust temperatures range from $590-850$\,K, and the warm dust mass is $\sim7\,M_{\odot}$. Such a large mass implies that the dust cannot be newly formed. We also derive the UV luminosity of $4-11\times10^{44}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$. The inferred total IR energy is $1-2\times10^{52}$\,erg, suggesting a large dust covering factor. Finally, our dust model suggests that the long tail of the optical flare could be due to dust scattering.
  • We use the AllWISE Data Release to continue our search for WISE-detected motions. In this paper, we publish another 27,846 motion objects, bringing the total number to 48,000 when objects found during our original AllWISE motion survey are included. We use this list, along with the lists of confirmed WISE-based motion objects from the recent papers by Luhman and by Schneider et al. and candidate motion objects from the recent paper by Gagne et al. to search for widely separated, common-proper-motion systems. We identify 1,039 such candidate systems. All 48,000 objects are further analyzed using color-color and color-mag plots to provide possible characterizations prior to spectroscopic follow-up. We present spectra of 172 of these, supplemented with new spectra of 23 comparison objects from the literature, and provide classifications and physical interpretations of interesting sources. Highlights include: (1) the identification of three G/K dwarfs that can be used as standard candles to study clumpiness and grain size in nearby molecular clouds because these objects are currently moving behind the clouds, (2) the confirmation/discovery of several M, L, and T dwarfs and one white dwarf whose spectrophotometric distance estimates place them 5-20 pc from the Sun, (3) the suggestion that the Na 'D' line be used as a diagnostic tool for interpreting and classifying metal-poor late-M and L dwarfs, (4) the recognition of a triple system including a carbon dwarf and late-M subdwarf, for which model fits of the late-M subdwarf (giving [Fe/H] ~ -1.0) provide a measured metallicity for the carbon star, and (5) a possible 24-pc-distant K5 dwarf + peculiar red L5 system with an apparent physical separation of 0.1 pc.
  • The optical light curve of the quasar PG 1302-102 at $z = 0.278$ shows a strong, smooth 5.2 yr periodic signal, detectable over a period of $\sim 20$ yr. Although the interpretation of this phenomenon is still uncertain, the most plausible mechanisms involve a binary system of two supermassive black holes with a subparsec separation. At this close separation, the nuclear black holes in PG 1302-102 will likely merge within $\sim 10^{5}$ yr due to gravitational wave emission alone. Here we report the rest-frame near-infrared time lags for PG 1302-102. Compiling data from {\it WISE} and {\it Akari}, we confirm that the periodic behavior reported in the optical light curve from Graham et al. (2015) is reproduced at infrared wavelengths, with best-fit observed-frame 3.4 and $4.6 \mu$m time lags of $(2219 \pm 153, 2408 \pm 148)$ days for a near face-on orientation of the torus, or $(4103\pm 153, 4292 \pm 148)$ days for an inclined system with relativistic Doppler boosting in effect. The periodicity in the infrared light curves and the light-travel time of the accretion disk photons to reach the dust glowing regions support that a source within the accretion disk is responsible for the optical variability of PG 1302-102, echoed at the further out dusty regions. The implied distance of this dusty, assumed toroidal region is $\sim$ 1.5 pc for a near face-on geometry, or $\sim$1.1 pc for the relativistic Doppler boosted case.
  • The 163 comets observed during the WISE/NEOWISE prime mission represent the largest infrared survey to date of comets, providing constraints on dust, nucleus sizes, and CO+CO2 production. We present detailed analyses of the WISE/NEOWISE comet discoveries, and discuss observations of the active comets showing 4.6 $\mu$m band excess. We find a possible relation between dust and CO+CO2 production, as well as possible differences in the sizes of long and short period comet nuclei.
  • We present thermal model fits for 11 Jovian and 3 Saturnian irregular satellites based on measurements from the WISE/NEOWISE dataset. Our fits confirm spacecraft-measured diameters for the objects with in situ observations (Himalia and Phoebe) and provide diameters and albedo for 12 previously unmeasured objects, 10 Jovian and 2 Saturnian irregular satellites. The best-fit thermal model beaming parameters are comparable to what is observed for other small bodies in the outer Solar System, while the visible, W1, and W2 albedos trace the taxonomic classifications previously established in the literature. Reflectance properties for the irregular satellites measured are similar to the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations, implying common origins.
  • Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are well-known to exhibit flux variability across a wide range of wavelength regimes, but the precise origin of the variability at different wavelengths remains unclear. To investigate the relatively unexplored near-IR variability of the most luminous AGNs, we conduct a search for variability using well sampled JHKs-band light curves from the 2MASS survey calibration fields. Our sample includes 27 known quasars with an average of 924 epochs of observation over three years, as well as one spectroscopically confirmed blazar (SDSSJ14584479+3720215) with 1972 epochs of data. This is the best-sampled NIR photometric blazar light curve to date, and it exhibits correlated, stochastic variability that we characterize with continuous auto-regressive moving average (CARMA) models. None of the other 26 known quasars had detectable variability in the 2MASS bands above the photometric uncertainty. A blind search of the 2MASS calibration field light curves for AGN candidates based on fitting CARMA(1,0) models (damped-random walk) uncovered only 7 candidates. All 7 were young stellar objects within the {\rho} Ophiuchus star forming region, five with previous X-ray detections. A significant {\gamma}-ray detection (5{\sigma}) for the known blazar using 4.5 years of Fermi photon data is also found. We suggest that strong NIR variability of blazars, such as seen for SDSSJ14584479+3720215, can be used as an efficient method of identifying previously-unidentified {\gamma}-ray blazars, with low contamination from other AGN.
  • The AllWISE processing pipeline has measured motions for all objects detected on WISE images taken between 2010 January and 2011 February. In this paper, we discuss new capabilities made to the software pipeline in order to make motion measurements possible, and we characterize the resulting data products for use by future researchers. Using a stringent set of selection criteria, we find 22,445 objects that have significant AllWISE motions, of which 3,525 have motions that can be independently confirmed from earlier 2MASS images yet lack any published motions in SIMBAD. Another 58 sources lack 2MASS counterparts and are presented as motion candidates only. Limited spectroscopic follow-up of this list has already revealed eight new L subdwarfs. These may provide the first hints of a "subdwarf gap" at mid-L types that would indicate the break between the stellar and substellar populations at low metallicities (i.e., old ages). Another object in the motion list -- WISEA J154045.67-510139.3 -- is a bright (J ~ 9 mag) object of type M6; both the spectrophotometric distance and a crude preliminary parallax place it ~6 pc from the Sun. We also compare our list of motion objects to the recently published list of 762 WISE motion objects from Luhman (2014). While these first large motion studies with WISE data have been very successful in revealing previously overlooked nearby dwarfs, both studies missed objects that the other found, demonstrating that many other nearby objects likely await discovery in the AllWISE data products.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) observed 52 Centaurs and Scattered Disk Objects in the thermal infrared, including the 15 discoveries that were new. We present analyses of these observations to estimate sizes and mean optical albedos. We find mean albedos of 0.08 +/- 0.04 for the entire data set. Thermal fits yield average beaming parameters of 0.9 +/- 0.2 that are similar for both SDO and Centaur sub-classes. Biased cumulative size distributions yield size-frequency distribution power law indices ~ -1.7 +/- 0.3. The data also reveal a relation between albedo and color at the 3-sigma level. No significant relation between diameter and albedos is found.
  • On January 18-19 and June 28-29 of 2010, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft imaged the Rosetta mission target, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. We present a preliminary analysis of the images, which provide a characterization of the dust environment at heliocentric distances similar to those planned for the initial spacecraft encounter, but on the outbound leg of its orbit rather than the inbound. Broad-band photometry yields low levels of CO2 production at a comet heliocentric distance of 3.32 AU and no detectable production at 4.18 AU. We find that at these heliocentric distances, large dust grains with mean grain diameters on the order of a millimeter or greater dominate the coma and evolve to populate the tail. This is further supported by broad-band photometry centered on the nucleus, which yield an estimated differential dust particle size distribution with a power law relation that is considerably shallower than average. We set a 3-sigma upper limit constraint on the albedo of the large-grain dust at <= 0.12. Our best estimate of the nucleus radius (1.82 +/- 0.20 km) and albedo (0.04 +/- 0.01) are in agreement with measurements previously reported in the literature.
  • We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the WISE all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12); Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify 7 fainter (4.5 $\mu$m $\sim$ 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy (HyLIRG) candidates. For this control sample we find another 6 brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the 7 companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these 7 Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this there is no evidence for any widely separated ($>$ 20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of $\sim$ 7.33 $\times 10^5$ objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m photometry, along with positionally matched $B$ and $R$ photometry from USNO-B; $J$, $H$, and $K_s$ photometry from 2MASS; and $W1$, $W2$, $W3$, and $W4$ photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.
  • We report results based on mid-infrared photometry of 5 active main belt objects (AMBOs) detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft. Four of these bodies, P/2010 R2 (La Sagra), 133P/Elst-Pizarro, (596) Scheila, and 176P/LINEAR, showed no signs of activity at the time of the observations, allowing the WISE detections to place firm constraints on their diameters and albedos. Geometric albedos were in the range of a few percent, and on the order of other measured comet nuclei. P/2010 A2 was observed on April 2-3, 2010, three months after its peak activity. Photometry of the coma at 12 and 22 {\mu}m combined with ground-based visible-wavelength measurements provides constraints on the dust particle mass distribution (PMD), dlogn/dlogm, yielding power-law slope values of {\alpha} = -0.5 +/- 0.1. This PMD is considerably more shallow than that found for other comets, in particular inbound particle fluence during the Stardust encounter of comet 81P/Wild 2. It is similar to the PMD seen for 9P/Tempel 1 in the immediate aftermath of the Deep Impact experiment. Upper limits for CO2 & CO production are also provided for each AMBO and compared with revised production numbers for WISE observations of 103P/Hartley 2.
  • We report results based on mid-infrared photometry of comet 103P/Hartley 2 taken during May 4-13, 2010 (when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of 2.3 AU, and an observer distance of 2.0 AU) by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (Wright et al. 2010). Photometry of the coma at 22 microns and data from the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope obtained on May 22, 2010 provide constraints on the dust particle size distribution, dlogn/dlogm, yielding power-law slope values of alpha = -0.97 +/- 0.10, steeper than that found for the inbound particle fluence during the Stardust encounter of comet 81P/Wild 2 (Green et al. 2004). The extracted nucleus signal at 12 microns is consistent with a body of average spherical radius of 0.6 +/- 0.2 km (one standard deviation), assuming a beaming parameter of 1.2. The 4.6 micron-band signal in excess of dust and nucleus reflected and thermal contributions may be attributed to carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide emission lines and provides limits and estimates of species production. Derived carbon dioxide coma production rates are 3.5(+/- 0.9) \times 10^24 molecules per second. Analyses of the trail signal present in the stacked image with an effective exposure time of 158.4 seconds yields optical-depth values near 9 x 10^-10 at a delta mean anomaly of 0.2 deg trailing the comet nucleus, in both 12 and 22 {\mu}m bands. A minimum chi-squared analysis of the dust trail position yields a beta-parameter value of 1.0 x10^-4, consistent with a derived mean trail-grain diameter of 1.1/{\rho} cm for grains of {\rho} g/cm^3 density. This leads to a total detected trail mass of at least 4 x 10^10 {\rho} kg.
  • Time-resolved databases with large spatial coverage are quickly becoming a standard tool for all types of astronomical studies. We report preliminary results from our search for stellar flares in the 2MASS calibration fields. A sample of 4343 M dwarfs, spatially matched between the SDSS and the 2MASS calibration fields, each with hundreds to thousands of epochs in near infrared bandpasses, is analyzed using a modified Welch-Stetson index to characterize the variability. A Monte Carlo model was used to assess the noise of the variability index. We find significnat residuals above the noise with power-law slopes of -3.37 and -4.05 for our JH and HKs distributions respectively. This is evidence for flares being observed from M dwarfs in infrared photometry.
  • The all sky surveys done by the Palomar Observatory Schmidt, the European Southern Observatory Schmidt, and the United Kingdom Schmidt, the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite and the 2 Micron All Sky Survey have proven to be extremely useful tools for astronomy with value that lasts for decades. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is mapping the whole sky following its launch on 14 December 2009. WISE began surveying the sky on 14 Jan 2010 and completed its first full coverage of the sky on July 17. The survey will continue to cover the sky a second time until the cryogen is exhausted (anticipated in November 2010). WISE is achieving 5 sigma point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in bands centered at wavelengths of 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background. The angular resolution is 6.1, 6.4, 6.5 and 12.0 arc-seconds at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns, and the astrometric precision for high SNR sources is better than 0.15 arc-seconds.
  • We have conducted a 4030-square-deg near-infrared proper motion survey using multi-epoch data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). We find 2778 proper motion candidates, 647 of which are not listed in SIMBAD. After comparison to DSS images, we find that 107 of our proper motion candidates lack counterparts at B-, R-, and I-bands and are thus 2MASS-only detections. We present results of spectroscopic follow-up of 188 targets that include the infrared-only sources along with selected optical-counterpart sources with faint reduced proper motions or interesting colors. We also establish a set of near-infrared spectroscopic standards with which to anchor near-infrared classifications for our objects. Among the discoveries are six young field brown dwarfs, five "red L" dwarfs, three L-type subdwarfs, twelve M-type subdwarfs, eight "blue L" dwarfs, and several T dwarfs. We further refine the definitions of these exotic classes to aid future identification of similar objects. We examine their kinematics and find that both the "blue L" and "red L" dwarfs appear to be drawn from a relatively old population. This survey provides a glimpse of the kinds of research that will be possible through time-domain infrared projects such as the UKIDSS Large Area Survey, various VISTA surveys, and WISE, and also through z- or y-band enabled, multi-epoch surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.
  • A search for young substellar objects in the rho Oph cloud core region has been made using the deep-integration Combined Calibration Scan images of the 2MASS extended mission in J, H and Ks bands, and Spitzer IRAC images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 microns. The field of view of the combined observations was 1 deg x 9.3 arcmin, and the 5 sigma limiting magnitude at J was 20.5. Comparison of the observed SEDs with the predictions of the COND and DUSTY models, for an assumed age of 1 Myr, supports the identification of many of the sources with brown dwarfs, and enables the estimation of effective temperature, Teff. The cluster members are then readily distinguishable from background stars by their locations on a plot of flux density versus Teff. The range of estimated Teff extends down to ~ 750 K, suggesting the presence of objects of sub-Jupiter mass. The results also suggest that the mass function for the rho Oph cloud resembles that of the sigma Orionis cluster based on a recent study, with both rising towards lower masses. The other main result from our study is the apparent presence of a progressive blueward skew in the distribution of J-H and H-Ks colors, such that the blue end of the range becomes increasingly bluer with increasing magnitude. We suggest that this behavior might be understood in terms of the 'ejected stellar embryo' hypothesis, whereby some of the lowest-mass brown dwarfs could escape to locations close to the front edge of the cloud, and thereby be seen with less extinction.
  • The 2MASS photometric calibration observations cover ~6 square degrees on the sky in 35 "calibration fields" each sampled in nominal photometric conditions between 562 and 3692 times during the four years of the 2MASS mission. We compile a catalog of variables from the calibration observations to search for M dwarfs transited by extra-solar planets. We present our methods for measuring periodic and non-periodic flux variability. From 7554 sources with apparent Ks magnitudes between 5.6 and 16.1, we identify 247 variables, including extragalactic variables and 23 periodic variables. We have discovered three M dwarf eclipsing systems, including two candidates for transiting extrasolar planets.
  • We present the reconstructed real-space density and the predicted velocity fields from the Two Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS). The 2MRS is the densest all-sky redshift survey to date and includes about 23,200 galaxies with extinction corrected magnitudes brighter than K = 11.25. Our method is based on the expansion of these fields in Fourier-Bessel functions. Within this framework, the linear redshift distortions only affect the density field in the radial direction and can easily be deconvolved using a distortion matrix. Moreover, in this coordinate system, the velocity field is related to the density field by a simple linear transformation. The shot noise errors in the reconstructions are suppressed by means of a Wiener filter which yields a minimum variance estimate of the density and velocity fields. Using the reconstructed real-space density fields, we identify all major superclusters and voids. At 50 Mpc/h, our reconstructed velocity field indicates a back-side infall to the Great Attractor region of vi = (491 +/- 200)(beta/0.5) km/sec in the Local Group frame and v = (64 +/- 205)(beta/0.5) km/sec in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) frame and beta is the redshift distortion parameter. The direction of the reconstructed dipole agrees well with the dipole derived by Erdogdu et al. (2006). The misalignment between the reconstructed 2MRS and the CMB dipoles drops to 13 degrees at around 5000 km/sec but then increases at larger distances. A version of this paper with high resolution figures can be obtained from http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~ppzzpe
  • A new, 2.8 deg^2 J,H,K_s infrared survey from the 2MASS 6x program across the extent of the optical disk of the Andromeda (M31) galaxy provides a clear view of the M31 center almost completely unfettered by dust extinction, and reveals a high contrast bulge with extremely boxy isophotes dominating the NIR light to a semi-major axis of ~700''(2.6 kpc). The inner bulge (<~50'') is relatively circular, but shows some isophotal twisting. Beyond this, the ellipticity and boxiness of the bulge increase with radius -- achieving a boxiness that rivals that of any other known disk galaxy observed in the near infrared -- and the position angle is constant at ~50 deg, which is about 10 deg higher than the position angle of the M31 disk. Boxy bulges in highly inclined disks have been shown to be the vertical structure of bars, and self-consistent, N-body modeling specific to the NIR images presented here can reproduce the observed NIR M31 features with a combination of a classical bulge and a boxy bulge/bar. Beyond the boxy bulge region and nearly along the 40 deg position angle of the disk a narrow ridge of infrared flux, which can be identified with the thin part of the bar, more or less symmetrically extends into the inner disk at semi-major axis radii of 700'' to 1200'' or more. Little variation in the morphology or relative brightnesses of these various M31 structures is seen across the NIR bands (i.e., no color gradients are seen). These new data verify that M31 is a barred spiral galaxy like the Milky Way.
  • We present the discovery of a bright (J = 13.94$\pm$0.03) T dwarf, 2MASS 1503+2525, identified in a new, wide-field search for T dwarfs using the recently completed Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The 1--2.5 $\micron$ spectrum of this object exhibits the strong H$_2$O and CH$_4$ bands characteristic of mid- and late-type T dwarfs, and we derive a spectral type of T5.5 using both the Burgasser et al. and the Geballe et al. classification schemes. Based on its spectral type and the absolute magnitudes of known T dwarfs, we estimate the distance of this object as 8$\pm$3 pc if it is single, likely within 10 pc of the Sun. Our new 2MASS search, which covers 74% of the sky and greatly expands on earlier color constraints, should identify 15--25 new T dwarfs with J $\leq$ 16. Combined with the 20 known members of this class that already fall within our search criteria, our new sample will provide improved statistics for such key quantities as the binary fraction and the field substellar mass function. Furthermore, multiple detections from overlapping 2MASS scans provide multiple epoch astrometry and photometry, and we present proper motions for five T dwarfs in our sample.
  • The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) is finding previously unidentified, luminous red active galactic nuclei (AGN). This new sample has a space density similar to, or greater than, previously known AGN, suggesting that a large fraction of the overall population has been missed. Chandra observations of a well-defined subset of these objects reveal that all are X-ray faint, with the reddest sources being the faintest in X-rays. The X-ray hardness ratios cover a wide range, generally indicating log NH ~21-23 /cm*2, but the softest sources show no spectral evidence for intrinsic absorption. These characteristics suggest that a mix of absorbed, direct emission and unabsorbed, scattered and/or extended emission contributes to the X-ray flux, although we cannot rule out the possibility that they are intrinsically X-ray weak. This population of X-ray faint, predominantly broad-line objects could provide the missing population of X-ray absorbed AGN required by current models of the cosmic X-ray background. The existence of AGN which display both broad emission lines and absorbed X-rays has important implications for unification schemes and emphasizes the need for care in assigning classifications to individual AGN.
  • We present near-infrared spectra for a sample of T dwarfs, including eleven new discoveries made using the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These objects are distinguished from warmer (L-type) brown dwarfs by the presence of methane absorption bands in the 1--2.5 $\micron$ spectral region. A first attempt at a near-infrared classification scheme for T dwarfs is made, based on the strengths of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the shapes of the 1.25, 1.6, and 2.1 $\micron$ flux peaks. Subtypes T1 V through T8 V are defined, and spectral indices useful for classification are presented. The subclasses appear to follow a decreasing T$_{eff}$ scale, based on the evolution of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the properties of L and T dwarfs with known distances. However, we speculate that this scale is not linear with spectral type for cool dwarfs, due to the settling of dust layers below the photosphere and subsequent rapid evolution of spectral morphology around T$_{eff}$ $\sim$ 1300--1500 K. Similarities in near-infrared colors and continuity of spectral features suggest that the gap between the latest L dwarfs and earliest T dwarfs has been nearly bridged. This argument is strengthened by the possible role of CH$_4$ as a minor absorber shaping the K-band spectra of the latest L dwarfs. Finally, we discuss one peculiar T dwarf, 2MASS 0937+2931, which has very blue near-infrared colors (J-K$_s$ = $-0.89\pm$0.24) due to suppression of the 2.1 $\micron$ peak. The feature is likely caused by enhanced collision-induced H$_2$ absorption in a high pressure or low metallicity photosphere.
  • We present the basic properties of three objects near the Galactic Plane - a large galaxy and two candidate globular clusters - discovered in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) dataset. All were noted during spot-checks of the data during 2MASS quality assurance reviews. The galaxy is a late-type spiral galaxy (Sc-Sd), ~11 Mpc distant. We estimate an extinction-corrected optical diameter of ~9.5', making it larger than most Messier galaxies. The candidate globular clusters are ~2-3' in extent and are hidden optically behind foreground extinctions of Av ~18-21 mag at l ~ 10 deg, b ~ 0 deg. These chance discoveries were not the result of any kind of systematic search but they do hint at the wealth of obscured sources of all kinds, many previously unknown, that are in the 2MASS dataset.
  • We measure the extent of 100 micron galactic emission in two independent galaxy samples using the IRAS 100 micron Sky Survey images and constrain the distribution of dust at large ($\ltsim$30 kpc) radii. The first sample consists of 90 nearby (v < 6000 km/s) galaxies from the RC3 catalog with similar angular sizes and absolute luminosities (5 arcmin $\leq $D$_{25} \leq$ 10 arcmin and $-22.5 \leq $M$_{B} \leq -18$) that are isolated in the 100 micron images. The second sample consists of 24 local galaxies (v < 1500 km/s, 10 arcmin $\leq $D$_{25} \leq$ 30 arcmin). We rescale the 100 micron images of these galaxies using their optical diameters, D$_{25}$, rotate the images using their optical major axis position angle, construct the mean and median image, and rebin the final images into polar coordinates to study the 100 micron emission as a function of radius and azimuthal angle. We find that the 100 micron emission extends at least to radii of 27 kpc (2$\sigma$ detection) for the typical galaxy in the 5 arcmin - 10 arcmin sample and to 21 kpc (2$\sigma$ detection) in the 10 arcmin - 30 arcmin sample (H$_{0} = $75 km/s/Mpc). In both samples, the emission is preferentially elongated along the optical major axis. We fit an exponential to the 100 micron emission along the major axis and measure a scale length of $2.5 \pm$ 0.8 kpc (90% confidence interval). Using a simple model that relates the far-IR emission to the stellar distribution, we examine the range of acceptable dust mass distributions allowed by our data and conclude that the dust is more extended than the starlight.