• We examine the excitation of unstable magnetosonic waves in the radiative envelopes of intermediate- and high-mass stars with a magnetic field of ~kG strength. Wind clumping close to the star and microturbulence can often be accounted for when including small-scale, sub-photospheric density or velocity perturbations. Compressional waves - with wavelengths comparable to or shorter than the gas pressure scale height - can be destabilized by the radiative flux in optically-thick media when a magnetic field is present, in a process called the Radiation-Driven Magneto-Acoustic Instability (RMI). The instability does not require radiation or magnetic pressure to dominate over gas pressure, and acts independently of sub-surface convection zones. Here we evaluate the conditions for the RMI to operate on a grid of stellar models covering a mass range $3-40M_\odot$ at solar metallicity. For a uniform 1kG magnetic field, fast magnetosonic modes are unstable down to an optical depth of a few tens, while unstable slow modes extend beyond the depth of the iron convection zone. The qualitative behavior is robust to magnetic field strength variations by a factor of a few. When combining our findings with previous results for the saturation amplitude of the RMI, we predict velocity fluctuations in the range ~0.1-10 km/s. These amplitudes are a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure, or alternatively, of the zero-age main sequence mass.
  • We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically-symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several $M_\odot$ for red supergiants to $\sim 0.1M_\odot$ for blue supergiants and $\sim 10^{-3} M_\odot $ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is $\lesssim 10^{47}-10^{48}$ erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.
  • During the core collapse of massive stars, the formation of the protoneutron star is accompanied by the emission of a significant amount of mass-energy ($\sim 0.3 \, M_{\odot}$) in the form of neutrinos. This mass-energy loss generates an outward-propagating pressure wave that steepens into a shock near the stellar surface, potentially powering a weak transient associated with an otherwise-failed supernova. We analytically investigate this mass-loss-induced wave generation and propagation. Heuristic arguments provide an accurate estimate of the amount of energy contained in the outgoing sound pulse. We then develop a general formalism for analyzing the response of the star to centrally concentrated mass loss in linear perturbation theory. To build intuition, we apply this formalism to polytropic stellar models, finding qualitative and quantitative agreement with simulations and heuristic arguments. We also apply our results to realistic pre-collapse massive star progenitors (both giants and compact stars). Our analytic results for the sound pulse energy, excitation radius, and steepening in the stellar envelope are in good agreement with full time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations. We show that {prior} to the sound pulses arrival at the stellar photosphere, the photosphere has already reached velocities $\sim 20-100 \%$ of the local sound speed, thus likely modestly decreasing the stellar effective temperature prior to the star disappearing. Our results provide important constraints on the physical properties and observational appearance of failed supernovae.
  • We investigate the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the winds ejected by accretion disks formed in neutron star mergers. We compute the element formation in disk outflows from hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) remnants of variable lifetime, including the effect of angular momentum transport in the disk evolution. We employ long-term axisymmetric hydrodynamic disk simulations to model the ejecta, and compute r-process nucleosynthesis with tracer particles using a nuclear reaction network containing $\sim 8000$ species. We find that the previously known strong correlation between HMNS lifetime, ejected mass, and average electron fraction in the outflow is directly related to the amount of neutrino irradiation on the disk, which dominates mass ejection at early times in the form of a neutrino-driven wind. Production of lanthanides and actinides saturates at short HMNS lifetimes ($\lesssim 10$ ms), with additional ejecta contributing to a blue optical kilonova component for longer-lived HMNSs. We find good agreement between the abundances from the disk outflow alone and the solar r-process distribution only for short HMNS lifetimes ($\lesssim 10$ ms). For longer lifetimes, the rare-earth and third r-process peaks are significantly under-produced compared to the solar pattern, requiring additional contributions from the dynamical ejecta. The nucleosynthesis signature from a spinning black hole (BH) can only overlap with that from a HMNS of moderate lifetime ($\lesssim 60$ ms). Finally, we show that angular momentum transport not only contributes with a late-time outflow component, but that it also enhances the neutrino-driven component by moving material to shallower regions of the gravitational potential, in addition to providing additional heating.
  • We investigate the ejecta from black hole - neutron star mergers by modeling the formation and interaction of mass ejected in a tidal tail and a disk wind. The outflows are neutron-rich, giving rise to optical/infrared emission powered by the radioactive decay of $r$-process elements (a kilonova). Here we perform an end-to-end study of this phenomenon, where we start from the output of a fully-relativistic merger simulation, calculate the post-merger hydrodynamical evolution of the ejecta and disk winds including neutrino physics, determine the final nucleosynthetic yields using post-processing nuclear reaction network calculations, and compute the kilonova emission with a radiative transfer code. We study the effects of the tail-to-disk mass ratio by scaling the tail density. A larger initial tail mass results in fallback matter becoming mixed into the disk and ejected in the subsequent disk wind. Relative to the case of a disk without dynamical ejecta, the combined outflow has lower mean electron fraction, faster speed, larger total mass, and larger absolute mass free of high-opacity Lanthanides or Actinides. In most cases, the nucleosynthetic yield is dominated by the heavy $r$-process contribution from the unbound part of the tidal tail. A Solar-like abundance distribution can however be obtained when the total mass of the dynamical ejecta is comparable to the mass of the disk outflows. The kilonova has a characteristic duration of 1 week and a luminosity of ~$10^{41}$ erg/s, with orientation effects leading to variations of a factor ~2 in brightness. At early times (< 1 day) the emission includes an optical component from the (hot) Lanthanide-rich material, but the spectrum evolves quickly to the infrared thereafter.
  • We consider $r$-process nucleosynthesis in outflows from black hole accretion discs formed in double neutron star and neutron star -- black hole mergers. These outflows, powered by angular momentum transport processes and nuclear recombination, represent an important -- and in some cases dominant -- contribution to the total mass ejected by the merger. Here we calculate the nucleosynthesis yields from disc outflows using thermodynamic trajectories from hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to a nuclear reaction network. We find that outflows produce a robust abundance pattern around the second $r$-process peak (mass number $A \sim 130$), independent of model parameters, with significant production of $A < 130$ nuclei. This implies that dynamical ejecta with high electron fraction may not be required to explain the observed abundances of $r$-process elements in metal poor stars. Disc outflows reach the third peak ($ A \sim 195$) in most of our simulations, although the amounts produced depend sensitively on the disc viscosity, initial mass or entropy of the torus, and nuclear physics inputs. Some of our models produce an abundance spike at $A = 132$ that is absent in the Solar system $r$-process distribution. The spike arises from convection in the disc and depends on the treatment of nuclear heating in the simulations. We conclude that disc outflows provide an important -- and perhaps dominant -- contribution to the $r$-process yields of compact binary mergers, and hence must be included when assessing the contribution of these systems to the inventory of $r$-process elements in the Galaxy.
  • The mergers of binaries containing neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes are the most promising sources for direct detection in gravitational waves by the interferometers Advanced LIGO and Virgo over the next few years. The concurrent detection of electromagnetic emission from these events would greatly enhance the scientific return of these discoveries. Here we review the state of the art in modeling the electromagnetic signal of neutron star binary mergers across different phases of the merger and multiple wavelengths. We focus on those observables which provide the most sensitive diagnostics of the merger physics and the contribution to the synthesis of rapid neutron capture ($r$-process) elements in the Galaxy. We also outline expected future developments on the observational and theoretical sides of this rapidly evolving field.
  • We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the case of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45 degrees from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8e46 erg is deposited within 45 degrees of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9e48 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a GRB jet.
  • We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g., unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem vc ~ (Edot G)^{1/5} (where Edot is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(r_h). For vc > vesc(r_h) the wind kinetic power at large radii Edot_w ~ Edot. For vc < vesc(r_h), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus Edot_w < Edot. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation diffusion using FLASH and one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radiation diffusion using MESA are in good agreement with the analytic predictions. The photon luminosity from the wind is itself super-Eddington but in many cases the photon luminosity is likely dominated by `internal shocks' in the wind. We discuss the application of our models to eruptive mass loss from massive stars and argue that the wind models described here can account for the broad properties of LBV outflows and the enhanced mass loss in the years prior to Type IIn core-collapse supernovae.
  • We investigate the effect of dimensionality on the transition to explosion in neutrino-driven core-collapse supernovae. Using parameterized hydrodynamic simulations of the stalled supernova shock in one-, two- (2D), and three spatial dimensions (3D), we systematically probe the extent to which hydrodynamic instabilities alone can tip the balance in favor of explosion. In particular, we focus on systems that are well into the regimes where the Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI) or neutrino-driven convection dominate the dynamics, and characterize the difference between them. We find that SASI-dominated models can explode with up to ~20% lower neutrino luminosity in 3D than in 2D, with the magnitude of this difference decreasing with increasing resolution. This improvement in explosion conditions is related to the ability of spiral modes to generate more non-radial kinetic energy than a single sloshing mode, increasing the size of the average shock radius, and hence generating better conditions for the formation of large-scale, high-entropy bubbles. In contrast, convection-dominated explosions show a smaller difference in their critical heating rate between 2D and 3D (<8%), in agreement with previous studies. The ability of our numerical implementation to maintain arbitrary symmetries is quantified with a set of SASI-based tests. We discuss implications for the diversity of explosion paths in a realistic supernova environment.
  • We explore the evolution of the different ejecta components generated during the merger of a neutron star (NS) and a black hole (BH). Our focus is the interplay between material ejected dynamically during the merger, and the wind launched on a viscous timescale by the remnant accretion disk. These components are expected to contribute to an electromagnetic transient and to produce r-process elements, each with a different signature when considered separately. Here we introduce a two-step approach to investigate their combined evolution, using two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Starting from the output of a merger simulation, we identify each component in the initial condition based on its phase space distribution, and evolve the accretion disk in axisymmetry. The wind blown from this disk is injected into a three-dimensional computational domain where the dynamical ejecta is evolved. We find that the wind can suppress fallback accretion on timescales longer than ~100 ms. Due to self-similar viscous evolution, the disk accretion at late times nevertheless approaches a power-law time dependence $\propto t^{-2.2}$. This can power some late-time GRB engine activity, although the available energy is significantly less than in traditional fallback models. Inclusion of radioactive heating due to the r-process does not significantly affect the fallback accretion rate or the disk wind. We do not find any significant modification to the wind properties at large radius due to interaction with the dynamical ejecta. This is a consequence of the different expansion velocities of the two components.
  • We study the radioactively-powered transients produced by accretion disk winds following a compact object merger. Starting with the outflows generated in two-dimensional hydrodynamical disk models, we use wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic light curves and spectra. We show that the brightness and color of the resulting kilonova transients carry information about the merger physics. In the regions of the wind where neutrino irradiation raises the electron fraction to Ye > 0.25, r-process nucleosynthesis halts before producing high-opacity, complex ions (the lanthanides). The kilonova light curves thus show two distinct components: a brief (~2 day) blue optical transient produced in the outer lanthanide-free ejecta, and a longer (~10 day) infrared transient produced in the inner, lanthanide line-blanketed region. Mergers producing a longer-lived neutron star, or a more rapidly spinning black hole, have stronger neutrino irradiation, generate more lanthanide-free ejecta, and are optically brighter and bluer. At least some optical emission is produced in all disk wind models, which should enhance the detectability of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources. However, the presence of even a small amount (10^{-4} Msun) of overlying, neutron-rich dynamical ejecta will act as a "lanthanide-curtain", obscuring the optical wind emission from certain viewing angles. Because the disk outflows have moderate velocities (~10,000 km/s), numerous resolved line features are discernible in the spectra, distinguishing disk winds from fast-moving dynamical ejecta, and offering a potential diagnostic of the detailed composition of freshly produced r-process material.
  • The accretion disk that forms after a neutron star merger is a source of neutron-rich ejecta. The ejected material contributes to a radioactively-powered electromagnetic transient, with properties that depend sensitively on the composition of the outflow. Here we investigate how the spin of the black hole remnant influences mass ejection on the thermal and viscous timescales. We carry out two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of merger remnant accretion disks including viscous angular momentum transport and approximate neutrino self-irradiation. The gravity of the spinning black hole is included via a pseudo-Newtonian potential. We find that a disk around a spinning black hole ejects more mass, up to a factor of several, relative to the non-spinning case. The enhanced mass loss is due to energy release by accretion occurring deeper in the gravitational potential, raising the disk temperature and hence the rate of viscous heating in regions where neutrino cooling is ineffective. The mean electron fraction of the outflow increases moderately with BH spin due to a highly-irradiated (though not neutrino-driven) wind component. While the bulk of the ejecta is still very neutron-rich, thus generating heavy r-process elements, the leading edge of the wind contains a small amount of Lanthanide-free material. This component can give rise to a ~1 day blue optical `bump' in a kilonova light curve, even in the case of prompt BH formation, which may facilitate its detection.
  • Mergers of binary neutron stars (NSs) usually result in the formation of a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS). Whether- and when this remnant collapses to a black hole (BH) depends primarily on the equation of state and on angular momentum transport processes, both of which are uncertain. Here we show that the lifetime of the merger remnant may be directly imprinted in the radioactively powered kilonova emission following the merger. We employ axisymmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of remnant accretion disks orbiting a HMNS of variable lifetime, and characterize the effect of this delay to BH formation on the disk wind ejecta. When BH formation is relatively prompt (~ 100 ms), outflows from the disk are sufficiently neutron rich to form heavy r-process elements, resulting in ~ week-long emission with a spectral peak in the near-infrared (NIR), similar to that produced by the dynamical ejecta. In contrast, delayed BH formation allows neutrinos from the HMNS to raise the electron fraction in the polar direction to values such that potentially Lanthanide-free outflows are generated. The lower opacity would produce a brighter, bluer, and shorter-lived ~ day-long emission (a `blue bump') prior to the late NIR peak from the dynamical ejecta and equatorial wind. This new diagnostic of BH formation should be useful for events with a signal to noise lower than that required for direct detection of gravitational waveform signatures.
  • In the collapsing core of massive stars, the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) can drive spiral modes that efficiently redistribute angular momentum. This process can impart a spin to the forming neutron star even when the progenitor star is non-rotating. Here we develop the first analytical description of the angular momentum redistribution driven by a spiral mode of the SASI. Our analysis, valid in the limit of small mode amplitude, shows that the angular momentum separation is driven by the Reynolds stress generated by the spiral mode. The resulting solutions compare favorably with previous three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the SASI in the linear and weakly non-linear phases. Reasonable agreement is also found when extrapolating the solutions into the fully non-linear phase. A Reynolds-decomposition of the flow is performed in the saturated state of these simulations, showing that outward angular momentum transport by the Reynolds stress and the fluctuating component of the mass flux balance inward transport by advection. We derive an approximate analytic expression for the maximum angular momentum deposited in the neutron star as a function of the mass accretion rate, shock radius, shock compression ratio, and amplitude of the spiral mode at the time of explosion. Implications for the birth spin periods of neutron stars are discussed.
  • The success of the neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernovae relies on the supporting action of two hydrodynamic instabilities: neutrino-driven convection and the Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI). Depending on the structure of the stellar progenitor, each of these instabilities can dominate the evolution of the gain region prior to the onset of explosion, with implications for the ensuing asymmetries. Here we examine the flow dynamics in the neighborhood of explosion by means of parametric two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations for which the linear stability properties are well understood. We find that systems for which the convection parameter is sub-critical (SASI-dominated) develop explosions once large-scale, high-entropy bubbles are able to survive for several SASI oscillation cycles. These long-lived structures are seeded by the SASI during shock expansions. Finite-amplitude initial perturbations do not alter this outcome qualitatively, though they can lead to significant differences in explosion times. Supercritical systems (convection-dominated) also explode by developing large-scale bubbles, though the formation of these structures is due to buoyant activity. Non-exploding systems achieve a quasi-steady state in which the time-averaged flow adjusts itself to be convectively sub-critical. We characterize the turbulent flow using a spherical Fourier-Bessel decomposition, identifying the relevant scalings and connecting temporal and spatial components. Finally, we verify the applicability of these principles on the general relativistic, radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of Mueller, Janka, & Heger (2012), and discuss implications for the three-dimensional case.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO-WDs), are currently the best cosmological "standard candles", but the triggering mechanism of the explosion is unknown. It was recently shown that the rate of head-on collisions of typical field CO-WDs in triple systems may be comparable to the SNe Ia rate. Here we provide evidence supporting a scenario in which the majority of SNe Ia are the result of such head-on collisions of CO-WDs. In this case, the nuclear detonation is due to a well understood shock ignition, devoid of commonly introduced free parameters such as the deflagration velocity or transition to detonation criteria. By using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with a fully resolved ignition process, we show that zero-impact-parameter collisions of typical CO-WDs with masses $0.5-1\,M_{\odot}$ result in explosions that synthesize $^{56}$Ni masses in the range of $\sim0.1-1\,M_{\odot}$, spanning the wide distribution of yields observed for the majority of SNe Ia. All collision models yield the same late-time ($>60$ days since explosion) bolometric light curve when normalized by $^{56}$Ni masses (to better than $30\%$), in agreement with observations. The calculated widths of the $^{56}$Ni-mass-weighted-line-of-sight velocity distributions are correlated with the calculated $^{56}$Ni yield, agreeing with the observed correlation. The strong correlation, shown here for the first time, between $^{56}$Ni yield and total mass of the colliding CO-WDs (insensitive to their mass ratio), is suggestive as the source for the continuous distribution of observed SN Ia features, possibly including the Philips relation.
  • Expulsion of neutron-rich matter following the merger of neutron star (NS) binaries is crucial to the radioactively-powered electromagnetic counterparts of these events and to their relevance as sources of r-process nucleosynthesis. Here we explore the long-term (viscous) evolution of remnant black hole accretion disks formed in such mergers by means of two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations. The evolution of the electron fraction due to charged-current weak interactions is included, and neutrino self-irradiation is modeled as a lightbulb that accounts for the disk geometry and moderate optical depth effects. Over several viscous times (~1s), a fraction ~10% of the initial disk mass is ejected as a moderately neutron-rich wind (Y_e ~ 0.2) powered by viscous heating and nuclear recombination, with neutrino self-irradiation playing a sub-dominant role. Although the properties of the outflow vary in time and direction, their mean values in the heavy-element production region are relatively robust to variations in the initial conditions of the disk and the magnitude of its viscosity. The outflow is sufficiently neutron-rich that most of the ejecta forms heavy r-process elements with mass number A >130, thus representing a new astrophysical source of r-process nucleosynthesis, distinct from that produced in the dynamical ejecta. Due to its moderately high entropy, disk outflows contain a small residual fraction ~1% of helium, which could produce a unique spectroscopic signature.
  • We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux -- the Radiation-Driven Magneto-Acoustic Instability (RMI, a.k.a. the "photon bubble" instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably-stratified, optically-thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments, and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-MHD simulations of local, stably-stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically-thick, highly-conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes and Socrates (2003) in that the RMI operates even in gas pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.
  • We explore the evolution of radiatively inefficient accretion disks in which nuclear reactions are dynamically important (`Nuclear Dominated Accretion Flows', or NuDAFs). Examples of such disks are those generated by the merger of a white dwarf with a neutron star or black hole, or by the collapse of a rotating star. Here we present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations that systematically explore the effect of adding a single nuclear reaction to a viscous torus. The equation of state, anomalous shear stress, and nuclear reactions are given parametric forms. Our results point to the existence of two qualitatively different regimes of NuDAF evolution: (1) steady accretion with quiescent burning; or (2) detonation of the disk. These outcomes are controlled primarily by the ratio of the nuclear energy released to the enthalpy at the burning radius. Disks detonate if this ratio exceeds a critical value (~1), and if burning occurs in regions where neutrino cooling is unimportant. Thermonuclear runaways are seeded by the turbulent mixing of hot ash with cold fuel at the burning front. Subcritical disks do not explode, but instead power a persistent collimated outflow of unbound material composed primarily of ash, with a mass-loss rate that increases with the nuclear binding energy released. We discuss the implications of our results for supernova-like counterparts from astrophysical events in the NuDAF regime. In particular, detonations following a white dwarf - neutron star merger could account for some subluminous Type Ia supernovae, such as the class defined by SN 2002cx.
  • We study the transition to runaway expansion of an initially stalled core-collapse supernova shock. The neutrino luminosity, mass accretion rate, and neutrinospheric radius are all treated as free parameters. In spherical symmetry, this transition is mediated by a global non-adiabatic instability that develops on the advection time and reaches non-linear amplitude. Here we perform high-resolution, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of stalled supernova shocks with realistic microphysics to analyze this transition. We find that radial instability is a sufficient condition for runaway expansion if the neutrinospheric parameters do not vary with time and if heating by the accretion luminosity is neglected. For a given unstable mode, transition to runaway occurs when fluid in the gain region reaches positive specific energy. We find approximate instability criteria that accurately describe the behavior of the system over a wide region of parameter space. The threshold neutrino luminosities are in general different than the limiting value for a steady-state solution. We hypothesize that multidimensional explosions arise from the excitation of unstable large-scale modes of the turbulent background flow, at threshold luminosities that are lower than in the laminar case.
  • In the magnetar model, the quiescent non-thermal soft X-ray emission from Anomalous X-ray Pulsars and Soft-Gamma Repeaters is thought to arise from resonant comptonization of thermal photons by charges moving in a twisted magnetosphere. Robust inference of physical quantities from observations is difficult, because the process depends strongly on geometry and current understanding of the magnetosphere is not very deep. The polarization of soft X-ray photons is an independent source of information, and its magnetospheric imprint remains only partially explored. In this paper we calculate how resonant cyclotron scattering would modify the observed polarization signal relative to the surface emission, using a multidimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that accounts for the gradual coupling of polarization eigenmodes as photons leave the magnetosphere. We employ a globally-twisted, self-similar, force-free magnetosphere with a power-law momentum distribution, assume a blackbody spectrum for the seed photons, account for general relativistic light deflection close to the star, and assume that vacuum polarization dominates the dielectric properties of the magnetosphere. The latter is a good approximation if the pair multiplicity is not much larger than unity. Phase-averaged polarimetry is able to provide a clear signature of the magnetospheric reprocessing of thermal photons and to constrain mechanisms generating the thermal emission. Phase-resolved polarimetry, in addition, can characterize the spatial extent and magnitude of the magnetospheric twist angle at ~100 stellar radii, and discern between uni- or bidirectional particle energy distributions, almost independently of every other parameter in the system. We discuss prospects for detectability with GEMS.
  • A stalled spherical accretion shock, such as that arising in core-collapse supernovae, is unstable to non-spherical perturbations. In three dimensions, this Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI) can develop spiral modes that spin-up the protoneutron star. Here we study these non-axisymmetric modes by combining linear stability analysis and three-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations with Zeus-MP, focusing on characterizing their spatial structure and angular momentum content. We do not impose any rotation on the background accretion flow, and use simplified microphysics with no neutrino heating or nuclear dissociation. Spiral modes are examined in isolation by choosing flow parameters such that only the fundamental mode is unstable for a given polar index, leading to good agreement with linear theory. We find that any superposition of sloshing modes with non-zero relative phases survives in the nonlinear regime and leads to angular momentum redistribution. It follows that the range of perturbations required to obtain spin-up is broader than that needed to obtain the limiting case of a phase shift of pi/2. The bulk of the angular momentum redistribution occurs during a phase of exponential growth, and arises from internal torques that are second order in the perturbation amplitude. This redistribution gives rise to at least two counter rotating regions, with the maximum angular momentum of a given sign approaching a significant fraction of the mass accretion rate times the shock radius squared (Mdot * r_shock^2 ~ 1E+47 g/cm^2/s, spin period ~60 ms). Nonlinear mode coupling at saturation causes the angular momentum to fluctuate in all directions with much smaller amplitudes.
  • The thermal emission detected from the millisecond pulsar J0437-4715 is not explained by standard cooling models of neutron stars without a heating mechanism. We investigated three heating mechanisms controlled by the rotational braking of the pulsar: breaking of the solid crust, superfluid vortex creep, and non-equilibrium reactions ('rotochemical heating'). We find that the crust cracking mechanism does not produce detectable heating. Given the dependence of the heating mechanisms on spin-down parameters, which leads to different temperatures for different pulsars, we study the thermal evolution for two types of pulsars: young, slowly rotating 'classical' pulsars and old, fast rotating millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We find that the rotochemical heating and vortex creep mechanism can be important both for classical pulsars and MSPs.
  • We investigate the effects of neutrino heating and alpha-particle recombination on the hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. Our focus is on the non-linear dynamics of the shock wave that forms in the collapse, and the assembly of positive energy material below it. To this end, we perform time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations with FLASH2.5 in spherical and axial symmetry. These generalize our previous calculations by allowing for bulk neutrino heating and for nuclear statistical equilibrium between n, p and alpha. The heating rate is freely tunable, as is the starting radius of the shock relative to the recombination radius of alpha-particles. An explosion in spherical symmetry involves the excitation of an overstable mode, which may be viewed as the L=0 version of the `Standing Accretion Shock Instability'. In 2D simulations, non-spherical deformations of the shock are driven by plumes of material with positive Bernoulli parameter, which are concentrated well outside the zone of strong neutrino heating. The non-spherical modes of the shock reach a large amplitude only when the heating rate is also high enough to excite convection below the shock. The critical heating rate that causes an explosion depends sensitively on the initial position of the shock relative to the recombination radius. Weaker heating is required to drive an explosion in 2D than in 1D, but the difference also depends on the size of the shock. Forcing the infalling heavy nuclei to break up into n and p below the shock only causes a slight increase in the critical heating rate, except when the shock starts out at a large radius. This shows that heating by neutrinos (or some other mechanism) must play a significant role in pushing the shock far enough out that recombination heating takes over.