• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • Recent work suggests that strong emission line, star-forming galaxies may be significant Lyman Continuum leakers. We combine archival HST broadband ultraviolet and optical imaging (F275W and F606W, respectively) with emission line catalogs derived from WFC3 IR G141 grism spectroscopy to search for escaping Lyman Continuum (LyC) emission from homogeneously selected $z\simeq$2.5 SFGs. We detect no escaping Lyman Continuum from SFGs selected on [OII] nebular emission (N=208) and, within a narrow redshift range, on [OIII]/[OII]. We measure 1$\sigma$ upper limits to the LyC escape fraction relative to the non-ionizing UV continuum from [OII] emitters, $f_{esc}<$5.6%, and strong [OIII]/[OII]$>$5 ELGs, $f_{esc}<$14.0%. Our observations are not deep enough to detect $f_{esc}\lesssim$10% typical of the low redshift Lyman continuum emitters. However, we find that this population represents a small fraction of the star-forming galaxy population at $z\simeq$2. Thus, unless the number of extreme emission line galaxies grows substantially to z$>$6, such galaxies may be insufficient for reionization. Deeper survey data in the rest-frame ionizing UV will be necessary to determine whether strong line ratios could be useful for pre-selecting LyC leakers at high redshift.
  • The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has provided the first map of the high energy (~ 0.01 -- 1 PeV) sky in neutrinos. Since neutrinos propagate undeflected, their arrival direction is an important identifier for sources of high energy particle acceleration. Reconstructed arrival directions are consistent with an extragalactic origin, with possibly a galactic component, of the neutrino flux. We present a statistical analysis of positional coincidences of the IceCube neutrinos with known astrophysical objects from several catalogs. When considering starburst galaxies with the highest flux in gamma-rays and infrared radiation, up to n=8 coincidences are found, representing an excess over the ~4 predicted for the randomized, or "null" distribution. The probability that this excess is realized in the null case, the p-value, is p=0.042. This value falls to p=0.003 for a partial subset of gamma-ray-detected starburst galaxies and superbubble regions in the galactic neighborhood. Therefore, it is possible that starburst galaxies, and the typically hundreds of superbubble regions within them, might account for a portion of IceCube neutrinos. The physical plausibility of such correlation is discussed briefly.
  • We present observations of a luminous galaxy at redshift z=6.573 --- the end of the reioinization epoch --- which has been spectroscopically confirmed twice. The first spectroscopic confirmation comes from slitless HST ACS grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically), which show a dramatic continuum break in the spectrum at restframe 1216 A wavelength. The second confirmation is done with Keck + DEIMOS. The continuum is not clearly detected with ground-based spectra, but high wavelength resolution enables the Lyman alpha emission line profile to be determined. We compare the line profile to composite line profiles at redshift z=4.5. The Lyman alpha line profile shows no signature of a damping wing attenuation, confirming that the intergalactic gas is ionized at redshift z=6.57. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms, even at redshifts where Lyman alpha is too attenuated by the neutral IGM to be detectable using traditional spectroscopy from the ground.
  • This document summarizes the results of a community-based discussion of the potential science impact of the Mayall+BigBOSS highly multiplexed multi-object spectroscopic capability. The KPNO Mayall 4m telescope equipped with the DOE- and internationally-funded BigBOSS spectrograph offers one of the most cost-efficient ways of accomplishing many of the pressing scientific goals identified for this decade by the "New Worlds, New Horizons" report. The BigBOSS Key Project will place unprecedented constraints on cosmological parameters related to the expansion history of the universe. With the addition of an open (publicly funded) community access component, the scientific impact of BigBOSS can be extended to many important astrophysical questions related to the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and the IGM. Massive spectroscopy is the critical missing ingredient in numerous ongoing and planned ground- and space-based surveys, and BigBOSS is unique in its ability to provide this to the US community. BigBOSS data from community-led projects will play a vital role in the education and training of students and in maintaining US leadership in these fields of astrophysics. We urge the NSF-AST division to support community science with the BigBOSS multi-object spectrograph through the period of the BigBOSS survey in order to ensure public access to the extraordinary spectroscopic capability.
  • We study stellar assembly and feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) around the epoch of peak star formation (1<z<2), by comparing hydrodynamic simulations to rest-frame UV-optical galaxy colours from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Early-Release Science (ERS) Programme. Our Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations include metal-dependent radiative cooling, star formation, kinetic outflows due to supernova explosions, and feedback from supermassive black holes. Our model assumes that when gas accretes onto black holes, a fraction of the energy is used to form either thermal winds or sub-relativistic momentum-imparting collimated jets, depending on the accretion rate. We find that the predicted rest-frame UV-optical colours of galaxies in the model that includes AGN feedback is in broad agreement with the observed colours of the WFC3 ERS sample at 1<z<2. The predicted number of massive galaxies also matches well with observations in this redshift range. However, the massive galaxies are predicted to show higher levels of residual star formation activity than the observational estimates, suggesting the need for further suppression of star formation without significantly altering the stellar mass function. We discuss possible improvements, involving faster stellar assembly through enhanced star formation during galaxy mergers while star formation at the peak epoch is still modulated by the AGN feedback.
  • (Abridged) We present here a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of FW4871, a massive galaxy at z=1.893+-0.002. We compare rest-frame optical and NUV slitless grism spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope with a large set of composite stellar populations to constrain the underlying star formation history. Even though the morphology features prominent tidal tails, indicative of a recent merger, there is no sign of on-going star formation within an aperture encircling one effective radius, which corresponds to a physical extent of 2.6 kpc. A model assuming truncation of an otherwise constant SFH gives a formation epoch zF~10, with a truncation after 2.7 Gyr, giving a mass-weighted age of 1.5 Gyr and a stellar mass of 0.8-3E11Msun, implying star formation rates of 30-110 Msun/yr. A more complex model including a recent burst of star formation places the age of the youngest component at 145 Myr, with a mass contribution lower than 20%, and a maximum amount of dust reddening of E(B-V)<0.4 mag (95% confidence levels). This low level of dust reddening is consistent with the low emission observed at 24 micron, corresponding to rest-frame 8 micron, where PAH emission should contribute significantly if a strong formation episode were present. The colour profile of FW4871 does not suggest a significant radial trend in the properties of the stellar populations out to 3Re. We suggest that the recent merger that formed FW4871 is responsible for the quenching of its star formation.
  • We present a large sample of candidate galaxies at z~7--10, selected in the HUDF using the new observations made by the HST/WFC3. Our sample is composed of 20 z-dropouts, 15 Y-dropouts, and 20 J-dropouts. The surface densities of the z-dropouts are close to what predicted by earlier studies, however, those of the Y- and J-dropouts are quite unexpected. While no Y- or J-dropouts have been found at AB < 28.0 mag, their surface densities seem to increase sharply at fainter levels. While some of these candidates seem to be close to foreground galaxies and thus could possibly be gravitationally lensed, the overall surface densities after excluding such cases are still much higher than what would be expected if the luminosity function does not evolve from z~7 to 10. Motivated by such steep increases, we tentatively propose a set of Schechter function parameters to describe the LFs at z~8 and 10. As compared to their counterpart at z~7, here L* decreases by ~ 6.5x and Phi* increases by 17--90x. Although such parameters are not yet demanded by the existing observations, they are allowed and seem to agree with the data better than other alternatives. If these LFs are still valid beyond our current detection limit, this would imply a sudden emergence of a large number of low-luminosity galaxies when looking back in time to z~10, which, while seemingly exotic, would naturally fit in the picture of the cosmic hydrogen reionization. These early galaxies could easily account for the ionizing photon budget required by the reionization, and they would imply that the global star formation rate density might start from a very high value at z~10, rapidly reach the minimum at z~7, and start to rise again towards z~6. In this scenario, the majority of the stellar mass that the universe assembled through the reionization epoch seems still undetected by current observations at z~6. [Abridged]
  • We present Wide Field Camera 3 images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope within a single field in the southern grand design star-forming galaxy M83. Based on their size, morphology and photometry in continuum-subtracted H$\alpha$, [\SII], H$\beta$, [\OIII] and [\OII] filters, we have identified 60 supernova remnant candidates, as well as a handful of young ejecta-dominated candidates. A catalog of these remnants, their sizes and, where possible their H$\alpha$ fluxes are given. Radiative ages and pre-shock densities are derived from those SNR which have good photometry. The ages lie in the range $2.62 < log(\tau_{\rm rad}/{\rm yr}) < 5.0$, and the pre-shock densities at the blast wave range over $0.56 < n_0/{\rm cm^{-3}} < 1680$. Two populations of SNR have been discovered. These divide into a nuclear and spiral arm group and an inter-arm population. We infer an arm to inter-arm density contrast of 4. The surface flux in diffuse X-rays is correlated with the inferred pre-shock density, indicating that the warm interstellar medium is pressurised by the hot X-ray plasma. We also find that the interstellar medium in the nuclear region of M83 is characterized by a very high porosity and pressure and infer a SNR rate of one per 70-150 yr for the nuclear ($R<300 $pc) region. On the basis of the number of SNR detected and their radiative ages, we infer that the lower mass of Type II SNe in M83 is $M_{\rm min} = 16^{+7}_ {-5}$ M$_{\odot}$. Finally we give evidence for the likely detection of the remnant of the historical supernova, SN1968L.
  • The Star Formation Camera (SFC) is a wide-field (~15'x19, >280 arcmin^2), high-resolution (18x18 mas pixels) UV/optical dichroic camera designed for the Theia 4-m space-borne space telescope concept. SFC will deliver diffraction-limited images at lambda > 300 nm in both a blue (190-517nm) and a red (517-1075nm) channel simultaneously. Our aim is to conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and their planetary systems, and to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process. This program addresses the origins and evolution of stars, galaxies, and cosmic structure and has direct relevance for the formation and survival of planetary systems like our Solar System and planets like Earth. We present the design and performance specifications resulting from the implementation study of the camera, conducted under NASA's Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Studies program, which is intended to assemble realistic options for mission development over the next decade. The result is an extraordinarily capable instrument that will provide deep, high-resolution imaging across a very wide field enabling a great variety of community science as well as completing the core survey science that drives the design of the camera. The technology associated with the camera is next generation but still relatively high TRL, allowing a low-risk solution with moderate technology development investment over the next 10 years. We estimate the cost of the instrument to be $390M FY08.
  • (Brief Summary) What is the total radiative content of the Universe since the epoch of recombination? The extragalactic background light (EBL) spectrum captures the redshifted energy released from the first stellar objects, protogalaxies, and galaxies throughout cosmic history. Yet, we have not determined the brightness of the extragalactic sky from UV/optical to far-infrared wavelengths with sufficient accuracy to establish the radiative content of the Universe to better than an order of magnitude. Among many science topics, an accurate measurement of the EBL spectrum from optical to far-IR wavelengths, will address: What is the total energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history? Was significant energy released by non-stellar processes? Is there a diffuse component to the EBL anywhere from optical to sub-millimeter? When did first stars appear and how luminous was the reionization epoch? Absolute optical to mid-IR EBL spectrum to an astrophysically interesting accuracy can be established by wide field imagingat a distance of 5 AU or above the ecliptic plane where the zodiacal foreground is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude.
  • We present redshifts for 115 emission line objects in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) identified through the GRism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) project using the slitless grism spectroscopy mode of the ACS Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The sample was selected by an emission line search on all extracted 1-dimensional GRAPES spectra. We identify the emission lines using line wavelength ratios where multiple lines are detected in the grism wavelength range (5800A < lambda < 9600A), and using photometric redshift information where multiple lines are unavailable. We then derive redshifts using the identified lines. Our redshifts are accurate to delta(z) = 0.009, based on both statistical uncertainty estimates and comparison with published ground-based spectra. Over 40% of our sample is fainter than typical magnitude limits for ground-based spectroscopy (with i_{AB}>25 mag). Such emission lines would likely remain undiscovered without our deep survey. The emission line objects fall into 3 categories: 1) Most are low to moderate redshift galaxies (0 < z < 2), including many actively star forming galaxies with strong HII regions; 2) 9 are high redshift (4 < z < 7) Lyman-alpha emitters; and 3) at least 3 are candidate AGNs.
  • We present a quantitative analysis of the morphologies for 199 nearby galaxies as parameterized with measurements of the concentration, asymmetry, and clumpiness (CAS) parameters at wavelengths from 0.15-0.85 micrometers. We find that these CAS parameters depend on both galaxy type and the wavelength of observation. As such, we use them to obtain a quantitative measure of the "morphological k-correction", i.e., the change in appearance of a galaxy with rest-frame wavelength. Whereas early-type galaxies (E--S0) appear about the same at all wavelengths longward of the Balmer break, there is a mild but significantly-determined wavelength-dependence of the CAS parameters for galaxies types later than S0, which generally become less concentrated, and more asymmetric and clumpy toward shorter wavelengths. Also, as a merger progresses from pre-merger via major-merger to merger-remnant stages, it evolves through the CAS parameter space, becoming first less concentrated and more asymmetric and clumpy, and then returning towards the "locus" of normal galaxies. The final merger products are, on average, much more concentrated than normal spiral galaxies.
  • We present measurements of sky surface brightness and seeing on Mt.Graham obtained at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) during 16 observing runs between April 1999 and December 2003. We show that the sky surface brightness is significantly darker during photometric conditions, and can be highly variable over the course of a single observing run as well as from one run to the next, regardless of photometricity. In our photometric observations we find an average low-airmass (sec z < 1.2) sky surface brightness of 22.00, 22.53, 21.49, and 20.88 mag arcsec^-2 in U, B, V, and R, respectively. The darkest run (02/00 in U and 02/01 in BVR) had an average sky surface brightness of 22.38, 22.86, 21.72, and 21.19 mag arcsec^-2 in U, B, V, and R, respectively. With these results we show that under the best conditions, Mt. Graham can compete with the darkest sites in Hawaii and Chile, thanks in part to the strict dark-sky ordinances in place in Tucson and Safford. We expect the sky over Mt. Graham to be even darker than our 1999--2003 results during solar minimum (2006--2007). We find a significant improvement of about 0.45 arcsec in our measured stellar FWHM after improvements to the telescope were made in Summer and Fall 2001. Stellar FWHM values are highly variable, with median R-band focus FWHM values in each observing run ranging from 0.97 arcsec to 2.15 arcsec. Significantly sub-arcsecond seeing was occasionally achieved with values as low as 0.65 arcsec FWHM in R. There may possibly still be a significant telescope contribution to the seeing at the VATT, but nearby trees as high as the dome are currently the dominant factor.
  • The weak radio source LBDS 53W091 is associated with a very faint (R approx. 24.5) red (R-K approx. 5.8) galaxy. Long spectroscopic integrations with the W. M. Keck telescope have provided an absorption-line redshift, z=1.552 +/- 0.002. The galaxy has a rest frame ultraviolet spectrum very similar to that of an F6V star, and a single-burst old stellar population that matches the IR colors, the optical energy distribution and the spectral discontinuities has a minimum age of 3.5 Gyr. We present detailed population synthesis analyses of the observed spectrum in order to estimate the time since the last major epoch of star formation. We discuss the discrepancies in these estimates resulting from using different models, subjecting the UV spectrum of M32 to the same tests as a measure of robustness of these techniques. The models most consistent with the data tend to yield ages at z=1.55 of >3.5Gyr, similar to that inferred for the intermediate-age population in M32. Depending upon the assumed Hubble constant and the value of Omega_0, only certain cosmological expansion times are consistent with the age of LBDS 53W091; in particular, for Omega_0=1, only models with H_0 < 45 km/s/Mpc are permitted. For H_0=50 km/s/Mpc and Omega_0=0.2, we derive a formation redshift, z_f >= 5.