• We analyze the intrinsic flux ratios of various visible--near-infrared filters with respect to 3.5micron for simple and composite stellar populations, and their dependence on age, metallicity and star formation history. UV/optical light from stars is reddened and attenuated by dust, where different sightlines across a galaxy suffer varying amounts of extinction. Tamura et al. (2009) developed an approximate method to correct for dust extinction on a pixel-by-pixel basis, dubbed the "beta_V" method, by comparing the observed flux ratio to an empirical estimate of the intrinsic ratio of visible and ~3.5micron data. Through extensive modeling, we aim to validate the "beta_V" method for various filters spanning the visible through near-infrared wavelength range, for a wide variety of simple and composite stellar populations. Combining Starburst99 and BC03 models, we built spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of simple (SSP) and composite (CSP) stellar populations for various realistic star formation histories (SFHs), while taking metallicity evolution into account. We convolve various 0.44--1.65micron filter throughput curves with each model SED to obtain intrinsic flux ratios beta_{lam,0}. When unconstrained in redshift, the total allowed range of beta_{V,0} is 0.6--4.7, or almost a factor of eight. At known redshifts, and in particular at low redshifts (z<0.01), beta_{V,0} is predicted to span a narrow range of 0.6--1.9, especially for early-type galaxies (0.6--0.7), and is consistent with observed beta_V values. The beta_lam method can therefore serve as a first-order dust correction method for large galaxy surveys that combine JWST (rest-frame 3.5micron) and HST (rest-frame visible--near-IR) data.
  • We present a study of the trade-off between depth and resolution using a large number of U-band imaging observations in the GOODS-North field (Giavalisco et al. 2004) from the Large Binocular Camera (LBC) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Having acquired over 30 hours of data (315 images with 5-6 mins exposures), we generated multiple image mosaics, starting with the best atmospheric seeing images (FWHM $\lesssim$0.8"), which constitute $\sim$10% of the total data set. For subsequent mosaics, we added in data with larger seeing values until the final, deepest mosaic included all images with FWHM $\lesssim$1.8" ($\sim$94% of the total data set). From the mosaics, we made object catalogs to compare the optimal-resolution, yet shallower image to the lower-resolution but deeper image. We show that the number counts for both images are $\sim$90% complete to $U_{AB}$ $\lesssim26$. Fainter than $U_{AB}$$\sim$ 27, the object counts from the optimal-resolution image start to drop-off dramatically (90% between $U_{AB}$ = 27 and 28 mag), while the deepest image with better surface-brightness sensitivity ($\mu^{AB}_{U}$$\lesssim$ 32 mag arcsec$^{-2}$) show a more gradual drop (10% between $U_{AB}$ $\simeq$ 27 and 28 mag). For the brightest galaxies within the GOODS-N field, structure and clumpy features within the galaxies are more prominent in the optimal-resolution image compared to the deeper mosaics. Finally, we find - for 220 brighter galaxies with $U_{AB}$$\lesssim$ 24 mag - only marginal differences in total flux between the optimal-resolution and lower-resolution light-profiles to $\mu^{AB}_{U}$$\lesssim$ 32 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. In only 10% of the cases are the total-flux differences larger than 0.5 mag. This helps constrain how much flux can be missed from galaxy outskirts, which is important for studies of the Extragalactic Background Light.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • We combine wide and deep galaxy number-count data from GAMA, COSMOS/G10, HST ERS, HST UVUDF and various near-, mid- and far- IR datasets from ESO, Spitzer and Herschel. The combined data range from the far-UV (0.15microns) to far-IR (500microns), and in all cases the contribution to the integrated galaxy light (IGL) of successively fainter galaxies converges. Using a simple spline fit, we derive the IGL and the extrapolated-IGL in all bands. We argue undetected low surface brightness galaxies and intra-cluster/group light is modest, and that our extrapolated-IGL measurements are an accurate representation of the extra-galactic background light. Our data agree with most earlier IGL estimates and with direct measurements in the far-IR, but disagree strongly with direct estimates in the optical. Close agreement between our results and recent very high-energy experiments (H.E.S.S. and MAGIC), suggest that there may be an additional foreground affecting the direct estimates. The most likely culprit could be the adopted Zodiacal light model. Finally we use a modified version of the two-component model to integrate the EBL and obtain measurements of the Cosmic Optical Background (COB) and Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) of: $24^{+4}_{-4}$nWm$^{-2}$sr$^{-1}$ and $26^{+5}_{-5}$nWm$^{-2}$sr$^{-1}$ respectively (48:52%). Over the next decade, upcoming space missions such as Euclid and WFIRST, have the capacity to reduce the COB error to $<1\%$, at which point comparisons to the very high energy data could have the potential to provide a direct detection and measurement of the reionisation field.
  • We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z=6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m_J>22.8, m_H>23.0 AB mag (2 sigma). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.3"-0.5" radius of mu_J > 23.5, mu_H > 23.7 AB magarc (2 sigma). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and S\'ersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit (mu_J > 23.5 AB magarc) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m_J > 22 - 23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log(IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope beta > -1.2\pm0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z~6 Lyman break galaxies.
  • We present a compelling case for a systematic and comprehensive study of the resolved and unresolved stellar populations, ISM, and immediate environments of galaxies throughout the local volume, defined here as D < 20 Mpc. This volume is our cosmic backyard and the smallest volume that encompasses environments as different as the Virgo, Ursa Major, Fornax and (perhaps) Eridanus clusters of galaxies, a large number and variety of galaxy groups, and several cosmic void regions. In each galaxy, through a pan-chromatic (160--1100nm) set of broad-band and diagnostic narrow-band filters, ISM structures and individual luminous stars to >~1 mag below the TRGB should be resolved on scales of <5 pc (at D <~ 20 Mpc, lambda ~ 800nm, for mu_I >~ 24 mag/arcsec^2 and m_{I,TRGB} <~ 27.5 mag). Resolved and unresolved stellar populations would be analyzed through color-magnitude and color-color diagram fitting and population synthesis modeling of multi-band colors and would yield physical properties such as spatially resolved star formation histories. The ISM within and around each galaxy would be analyzed using key narrow-band filters that distinguish photospheric from shock heating and provide information on the metallicity of the gas. Such a study would finally allow unraveling the global and spatially resolved star formation histories of galaxies, their assembly, satellite systems, and the dependences thereof on local and global environment within a truly representative cosmic volume. The proposed study is not feasible with current instrumentation but argues for a wide-field (>~250 arcmin^2), high-resolution (<~0.020"--0.065" [300--1000nm]), ultraviolet--near-infrared imaging facility on a 4m-class space-based observatory.
  • [abridged] We propose a tiered, UV--near-IR, cosmological broad- and medium-band imaging and grism survey that covers ~10 deg^2 in two epochs to m_AB=28, ~3 deg^2 in seven epochs to m_AB=28, and ~1 deg^2 in 20 epochs to m_AB=30 mag. Such a survey is an essential complement to JWST surveys (<~0.1 deg^2 to m_AB<~31 mag at lambda>1100nm and z>~8). We aim to: (1) understand in how galaxies formed from perturbations in the primordial density field by studying faint Ly\alpha-emitting and Lyman-break galaxies at 5.5<~z<~8 and trace the metal-enrichment of the IGM; (2) measure the evolution of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) from z~8 to z~0 by mapping the ramp-up of PopII star formation, (dwarf) galaxy formation and assembly, and hence, the objects that likely completed the H-reionization at z~6; (3) directly study the lambda<91.2nm escape fractions of galaxies and weak AGN from z~4.0--2.5, when the He reionization finished; (4) measure the mass- and environment-dependent galaxy assembly process from z~5 to z~0, combining accurate (sigma_z/(1+z) <~ 0.02) photo-z's with spatially resolved stellar populations and kpc-scale structure for >~5x10^6 galaxies; (5) trace the strongly epoch-dependent galaxy merger rate and constrain how Dark Energy affected galaxy assembly and the growth of SMBHs; (6) study >~10^5 weak AGN/feeding SMBHs in the faint-end of the QSO LF, over 10 deg^2 and measure how the growth of SMBHs kept pace with galaxy assembly and spheroid growth, and how this process was shaped by various feedback processes over cosmic times since z~8. The proposed study is not feasible with current instrumentation but argues for a wide-field (>~250 arcmin^2), high-resolution (<~0.02--0.11 [300--1700 nm]), UV--near-IR imaging facility on a 4m-class space observatory.
  • We introduce a dataset of 142 mostly late-type spiral, irregular, and peculiar (interacting or merging) nearby galaxies observed in UBVR at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT), and present an analysis of their radial color gradients. We confirm that nearby elliptical and early- to mid-type spiral galaxies show either no or only small color gradients, becoming slightly bluer with radius. In contrast, we find that late-type spiral, irregular, peculiar, and merging galaxies become on average redder with increasing distance from the center. The scatter in radial color gradient trends increases toward later Hubble type. As a preliminary analysis of a larger data-set obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we also analyze the color gradients of six nearby galaxies observed with NICMOS in the near-IR (H) and with WFPC2 in the mid-UV (F300W) and red (F814W). We discuss the possible implication of these results on galaxy formation and compare our nearby galaxy color gradients to those at high redshift. We present examples of images and UBVR radial surface brightness and color profiles, and of the tables of measurements; the full atlas and tables are published in the electronic edition only.
  • We investigate the [OII] emission-line as a star formation rate (SFR) indicator using integrated spectra of 97 galaxies from the Nearby Field Galaxies Survey (NFGS). The sample includes all Hubble types and contains SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 Msun/yr. We compare the Kennicutt [OII] and H-alpha SFR calibrations and show that there are two significant effects which produce disagreement between SFR[OII] and SFR(H-alpha): reddening and metallicity. Differences in the ionization state of the ISM do not contribute significantly to the observed difference between SFR([OII]) and SFR(H-alpha) for the NFGS galaxies with metallicities log(O/H)12>8.5. The Kennicutt [OII]-SFR relation assumes a typical reddening for nearby galaxies; in practice, the reddening differs significantly from sample to sample. We derive a new SFR([OII]) calibration which does not contain a reddening assumption. Our new SFR([OII]) calibration also provides an optional correction for metallicity. Our SFRs derived from [OII] agree with those derived from H-alpha to within 0.03-0.05 dex. We apply our SFR([OII]) calibration with metallicity correction to two samples: high-redshift 0.8<z<1.6 galaxies from the NICMOS H-alpha survey, and 0.5<z<1.1 galaxies from the Canada-France Redshift Survey. The SFR([OII]) and SFR(H-alpha) for these samples agree to within the scatter observed for the NFGS sample, indicating that our SFR([OII]) relation can be applied to both local and high-z galaxies. Finally, we apply our SFR([OII]) to estimates of the cosmic star formation history. After reddening and metallicity corrections, the star formation rate densities derived from [OII] and H-alpha agree to within 30%.