• Interpreting the small-scale clustering of galaxies with halo models can elucidate the connection between galaxies and dark matter halos. Unfortunately, the modelling is typically not sufficiently accurate for ruling out models statistically. It is thus difficult to use the information encoded in small scales to test cosmological models or probe subtle features of the galaxy-halo connection. In this paper, we attempt to push halo modelling into the "accurate" regime with a fully numerical mock-based methodology and careful treatment of statistical and systematic errors. With our forward-modelling approach, we can incorporate clustering statistics beyond the traditional two-point statistics. We use this modelling methodology to test the standard $\Lambda\mathrm{CDM}$ + halo model against the clustering of SDSS DR7 galaxies. Specifically, we use the projected correlation function, group multiplicity function and galaxy number density as constraints. We find that while the model fits each statistic separately, it struggles to fit them simultaneously. Adding group statistics leads to a more stringent test of the model and significantly tighter constraints on model parameters. We explore the impact of varying the adopted halo definition and cosmological model and find that changing the cosmology makes a significant difference. The most successful model we tried (Planck cosmology with Mvir halos) matches the clustering of low luminosity galaxies, but exhibits a 2.3$\sigma$ tension with the clustering of luminous galaxies, thus providing evidence that the "standard" halo model needs to be extended. This work opens the door to adding interesting freedom to the halo model and including additional clustering statistics as constraints.
  • We compare reduced three-point correlations $Q$ of matter, haloes (as proxies for galaxies) and their cross correlations, measured in a total simulated volume of $\sim100 \ (h^{-1} \text{Gpc})^{3}$, to predictions from leading order perturbation theory on a large range of scales in configuration space. Predictions for haloes are based on the non-local bias model, employing linear ($b_1$) and non-linear ($c_2$, $g_2$) bias parameters, which have been constrained previously from the bispectrum in Fourier space. We also study predictions from two other bias models, one local ($g_2=0$) and one in which $c_2$ and $g_2$ are determined by $b_1$ via an approximately universal relation. Overall, measurements and predictions agree when $Q$ is derived for triangles with $(r_1r_2r_3)^{1/3} \gtrsim 60 h^{-1}\text{Mpc}$, where $r_{1-3}$ are the sizes of the triangle legs. Predictions for $Q_{matter}$, based on the linear power spectrum, show significant deviations from the measurements at the BAO scale (given our small measurement errors), which strongly decrease when adding a damping term or using the non-linear power spectrum, as expected. Predictions for $Q_{halo}$ agree best with measurements at large scales when considering non-local contributions. The universal bias model works well for haloes and might therefore be also useful for tightening constraints on $b_1$ from $Q$ in galaxy surveys. Such constraints are independent of the amplitude of matter density fluctuation ($\sigma_8$) and hence break the degeneracy between $b_1$ and $\sigma_8$, present in galaxy two-point correlations.
  • We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements of the quasar sample from Data Release 14 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) in configuration space. The $\sim 147,000$ quasar sample observed by eBOSS offers a direct tracer of the density field and bridges the gap of previous BAO measurements between redshift $0.8<z<2.2$. By analysing the two-point correlation function characterized by clustering wedges $\xi_{\rm w_i}(s)$ and multipoles $\xi_{\ell}(s)$, we measure the angular diameter distance, Hubble parameter and cosmic structure growth rate. We define a systematic error budget for our measurements based on the analysis of $N$-body simulations and mock catalogues. Based on the DR14 large scale structure quasar sample at the effective redshift $z_{\rm eff}=1.52$, we find the growth rate of cosmic structure $f\sigma_8(z_{\rm eff})=0.396\pm 0.079$, and the geometric parameters $D_{\rm V}(z)/r_{\rm d}=26.47\pm 1.23$, and $F_{\rm AP}(z)=2.53\pm 0.22$, where the uncertainties include both statistical and systematic errors. These values are in excellent agreement with the best-fitting standard ${\rm \Lambda CDM}$ model to the latest cosmic microwave background data from Planck.
  • Efficient estimators of Fourier-space statistics for large number of objects rely on Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), which are affected by aliasing from unresolved small scale modes due to the finite FFT grid. Aliasing takes the form of a sum over images, each of them corresponding to the Fourier content displaced by increasing multiples of the sampling frequency of the grid. These spurious contributions limit the accuracy in the estimation of Fourier-space statistics, and are typically ameliorated by simultaneously increasing grid size and discarding high-frequency modes. This results in inefficient estimates for e.g. the power spectrum when desired systematic biases are well under per-cent level. We show that using interlaced grids removes odd images, which include the dominant contribution to aliasing. In addition, we discuss the choice of interpolation kernel used to define density perturbations on the FFT grid and demonstrate that using higher-order interpolation kernels than the standard Cloud in Cell algorithm results in significant reduction of the remaining images. We show that combining fourth-order interpolation with interlacing gives very accurate Fourier amplitudes and phases of density perturbations. This results in power spectrum and bispectrum estimates that have systematic biases below 0.01% all the way to the Nyquist frequency of the grid, thus maximizing the use of unbiased Fourier coefficients for a given grid size and greatly reducing systematics for applications to large cosmological datasets.
  • (abridged) We investigate the signatures left by the cosmic neutrino background on the clustering of matter, CDM+baryons and halos in redshift-space using a set of more than 1000 N-body and hydrodynamical simulations with massless and massive neutrinos. We find that the effect neutrinos induce on the clustering of CDM+baryons in redshift-space on small scales is almost entirely due to the change in $\sigma_8$. Neutrinos imprint a characteristic signature in the quadrupole of the matter (CDM+baryons+neutrinos) field on small scales, that can be used to disentangle the effect of $\sigma_8$ and $M_\nu$. We show that the effect of neutrinos on the clustering of halos is very different, on all scales, to the one induced by $\sigma_8$. We find that the effects of neutrinos of the growth rate of CDM+baryons ranges from $\sim0.3\%$ to $2\%$ on scales $k\in[0.01, 0.5]~h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ for neutrinos with masses $M_\nu \leqslant 0.15$ eV. We compute the bias between the momentum of halos and the momentum of CDM+baryon and find it to be 1 on large scales for all models with massless and massive neutrinos considered. This point towards a velocity bias between halos and total matter on large scales that it is important to account for in order to extract unbiased neutrino information from velocity/momentum surveys such as kSZ observations. We show that baryonic effects can affect the clustering of matter and CDM+baryons in redshift-space by up to a few percent down to $k=0.5~h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. We find that hydrodynamics and astrophysical processes, as implemented in our simulations, only distort the relative effect that neutrinos induce on the anisotropic clustering of matter, CDM+baryons and halos in redshift-space by less than $1\%$. Thus, the effect of neutrinos in the fully non-linear regime can be written as a transfer function with very weak dependence on astrophysics.
  • We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final BOSS DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, $\omega(\theta)$, in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard $\Lambda$CDM model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from $w_\rm{DE} = -1$, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity using the growth-index $\gamma$ parametrisation. These results are, in general, comparable to the most precise present-day constraints on cosmological parameters, and show very good agreement with the standard model. In particular, combining CMB, $\omega(\theta)$ and SNIa, we find a value of $w_\rm{DE}$ consistent with $-1$ to a precision better than 5\% when it is assumed to be constant in time, and better than 6\% when we also allow for a spatially-curved Universe.
  • The protohalo patches from which halos form are defined by a number of constraints imposed on the Lagrangian dark matter density field. Each of these constraints contributes to biasing the spatial distribution of the protohalos relative to the matter. We show how measurements of this spatial distribution -- linear combinations of protohalo bias factors -- can be used to make inferences about the physics of halo formation. Our analysis exploits the fact that halo bias factors satisfy consistency relations which encode this physics, and that these relations are the same even for sub-populations in which assembly bias has played a role. We illustrate our methods using a model in which three parameters matter: a density threshold, the local slope and the curvature of the smoothed density field. The latter two are nearly degenerate; our approach naturally allows one to build an accurate effective two-parameter model for which the consistency relations still apply. This, with an accurate description of the smoothing window, allows one to describe the protohalo-matter cross-correlation very well, both in Fourier and configuration space. We then use our determination of the large scale bias parameters together with the consistency relations, to estimate the enclosed density and mean slope on the Lagrangian radius scale of the protohalos. Direct measurements of these quantities, made on smaller scales than those on which the bias parameters are typically measured, are in good agreement.
  • We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles l > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a {\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we constrain the matter density to {\Omega}_m = 0.311 -0.010 +0.009 and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6 -0.6 +0.7 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, at a confidence level (CL) of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the {\Lambda}CDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019 -0.039 +0.048. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. 2016 to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.
  • Fiber-fed multi-object spectroscopic surveys, with their ability to collect an unprecedented number of redshifts, currently dominate large-scale structure studies. However, physical constraints limit these surveys from successfully collecting redshifts from galaxies too close to each other on the focal plane. This ultimately leads to significant systematic effects on galaxy clustering measurements. Using simulated mock catalogs, we demonstrate that fiber collisions have a significant impact on the power spectrum, $P(k)$, monopole and quadrupole that exceeds sample variance at scales smaller than $k\sim0.1~h/Mpc$. We present two methods to account for fiber collisions in the power spectrum. The first, statistically reconstructs the clustering of fiber collided galaxy pairs by modeling the distribution of the line-of-sight displacements between them. It also properly accounts for fiber collisions in the shot-noise correction term of the $P(k)$ estimator. Using this method, we recover the true $P(k)$ monopole of the mock catalogs with residuals of $<0.5\%$ at $k=0.3~h/Mpc$ and $<4\%$ at $k=0.83~h/Mpc$ -- a significant improvement over existing correction methods. The quadrupole, however, does not improve significantly. The second method models the effect of fiber collisions on the power spectrum as a convolution with a configuration space top-hat function that depends on the physical scale of fiber collisions. It directly computes theoretical predictions of the fiber-collided $P(k)$ multipoles and reduces the influence of smaller scales to a set of nuisance parameters. Using this method, we reliably model the effect of fiber collisions on the monopole and quadrupole down to the scale limits of theoretical predictions. The methods we present in this paper will allow us to robustly analyze galaxy power spectrum multipole measurements to much smaller scales than previously possible.
  • We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, galaxy bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales $s \gtrsim 20\,h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$. We combined the galaxy clustering information from BOSS with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter to $w_{\rm DE}=-0.996\pm0.042$ when assumed time-independent, the curvature of the Universe to $\Omega_{k}=-0.0007\pm 0.0030$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to $\sum m_{\nu} < 0.25\,{\rm eV}$ at 95 per cent CL. We explore the constraints on the growth rate of cosmic structures assuming $f(z)=\Omega_{\rm m}(z)^\gamma$ and obtain $\gamma = 0.609\pm 0.079$, in good agreement with the predictions of general relativity of $\gamma=0.55$. We compress the information of our clustering measurements into constraints on the parameter combinations $D_{\rm V}(z)/r_{\rm d}$, $F_{\rm AP}(z)$ and $f\sigma_8(z)$ at the effective redshifts of $z=0.38$, $0.51$ and $0.61$ with their respective covariance matrices and find good agreement with the predictions for these parameters obtained from the best-fitting $\Lambda$CDM model to the CMB data from the Planck satellite. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.
  • We present a study of the clustering and halo occupation distribution of BOSS CMASS galaxies in the redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7 drawn from the Final SDSS-III Data Release. We compare the BOSS results with the predictions of a Halo Abundance Matching (HAM) clustering model that assigns galaxies to dark matter halos selected from the large BigMultiDark $N$-body simulation of a flat $\Lambda$CDM Planck cosmology. We compare the observational data with the simulated ones on a light-cone constructed from 20 subsequent outputs of the simulation. Observational effects such as incompleteness, geometry, veto masks and fiber collisions are included in the model, which reproduces within 1-$\sigma$ errors the observed monopole of the 2-point correlation function at all relevant scales: from the smallest scales, 0.5 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, up to scales beyond the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation feature. This model also agrees remarkably well with the BOSS galaxy power spectrum (up to $k\sim1$ $h$ Mpc$^{-1}$), and the Three-point correlation function. The quadrupole of the correlation function presents some tensions with observations. We discuss possible causes that can explain this disagreement, including target selection effects. Overall, the standard HAM model describes remarkably well the clustering statistics of the CMASS sample. We compare the stellar to halo mass relation for the CMASS sample measured using weak lensing in the CFHT Stripe 82 Survey with the prediction of our clustering model, and find a good agreement within 1-$\sigma$. The BigMD-BOSS light-cone including properties of BOSS galaxies and halo properties is made publicly available.
  • We apply the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to the stacked voids identified using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We also use 1000 mock galaxy catalogs that match the geometry, density, and clustering properties of the BOSS sample in order to characterize the statistical uncertainties of our measurements and take into account systematic errors such as redshift space distortions. For both BOSS data and mock catalogs, we use the ZOBOV algorithm to identify voids, we stack together all voids with effective radii of 30-100Mpc/h in the redshift range 0.43-0.7, and we accurately measure the shape of the stacked voids. Our tests with the mock catalogs show that we measure the stacked void ellipticity with a statistical precision of 2.6%. We find that the stacked voids in redshift space are slightly squashed along the line of sight, which is consistent with previous studies. We repeat this measurement of stacked void shape in the BOSS data assuming several values of Omega_m within the flat LCDM model, and we compare to the mock catalogs in redshift space in order to perform the AP test. We obtain a constraint of $\Omega_m = 0.38^{+0.18}_{-0.15}$ at the 68% confidence level from the AP test. We discuss the various sources of statistical and systematic noise that affect the constraining power of this method. In particular, we find that the measured ellipticity of stacked voids scales more weakly with cosmology than the standard AP prediction, leading to significantly weaker constraints. We discuss how AP constraints will improve in future surveys with larger volumes and densities.
  • Future galaxy surveys require one percent precision in the theoretical knowledge of the power spectrum over a large range including very nonlinear scales. While this level of accuracy is easily obtained in the linear regime with perturbation theory, it represents a serious challenge for small scales where numerical simulations are required. In this paper we quantify the precision of present-day $N$-body methods, identifying main potential error sources from the set-up of initial conditions to the measurement of the final power spectrum. We directly compare three widely used $N$-body codes, Ramses, Pkdgrav3, and Gadget3 which represent three main discretisation techniques: the particle-mesh method, the tree method, and a hybrid combination of the two. For standard run parameters, the codes agree to within one percent at $k\leq1$ $h\,\rm Mpc^{-1}$ and to within three percent at $k\leq10$ $h\,\rm Mpc^{-1}$. We also consider the bispectrum and show that the reduced bispectra agree at the sub-percent level for $k\leq 2$ $h\,\rm Mpc^{-1}$. In a second step, we quantify potential errors due to initial conditions, box size, and resolution using an extended suite of simulations performed with our fastest code Pkdgrav3. We demonstrate that the simulation box size should not be smaller than $L=0.5$ $h^{-1}\rm Gpc$ to avoid systematic finite-volume effects (while much larger boxes are required to beat down the statistical sample variance). Furthermore, a maximum particle mass of $M_{\rm p}=10^{9}$ $h^{-1}\rm M_{\odot}$ is required to conservatively obtain one percent precision of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, numerical simulations covering large survey volumes of upcoming missions such as DES, LSST, and Euclid will need more than a trillion particles to reproduce clustering properties at the targeted accuracy.
  • We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the galaxy catalog. We identify a total of 10,643 voids. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we obtain 1,228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20-100Mpc/h and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We release versions of the catalogs both with and without quality cuts. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stellar mass distribution of galaxies living inside and outside of the voids, and find no significant difference. These BOSS and mock void catalogs are useful for a number of cosmological and galaxy environment studies.
  • The window function for protohalos in Lagrangian space is often assumed to be a tophat in real space. We measure this profile directly and find that it is more extended than a tophat but less extended than a Gaussian; its shape is well-described by rounding the edges of the tophat by convolution with a Gaussan that has a scale length about 5 times smaller. This effective window $W_{\rm eff}$ is particularly simple in Fourier space, and has an analytic form in real space. Together with the excursion set bias parameters, $W_{\rm eff}$ describes the scale-dependence of the Lagrangian halo-matter cross correlation up to $kR_{\rm Lag} \sim 10 $, where $R_{\rm Lag}$ is the Lagrangian size of the protohalo. Moreover, with this $W_{\rm eff}$, all the spectral moments of the power spectrum are finite. While this simplifies analysis of the excursion set peak model, the predicted mass function which results is significantly lower, and hence appreciably lower than in simulations for halos of mass $\lesssim 10^{14} M_{\odot}/h $.
  • We report a measurement of the large-scale 3-point correlation function of galaxies using the largest dataset for this purpose to date, 777, 202 Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS BOSS) DR12 CMASS sample. This work exploits the novel algorithm of Slepian & Eisenstein (2015b) to compute the multipole moments of the 3PCF in $\mathcal{O}(N^2)$ time, with $N$ the number of galaxies. Leading-order perturbation theory models the data well in a compressed basis where one triangle side is integrated out. We also present an accurate and computationally efficient means of estimating the covariance matrix. With these techniques the redshift-space linear and non-linear bias are measured, with 2.6% precision on the former if $\sigma_8$ is fixed. The data also indicates a $2.8\sigma$ preference for the BAO, confirming the presence of BAO in the 3-point function.
  • Redshift-space distortions in galaxy surveys happen along the radial direction, breaking statistical translation invariance. We construct estimators for radial distortions that, using only Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) of the overdensity field multipoles for a given survey geometry, compute the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole, and generalize such estimators to the bispectrum. Using realistic mock catalogs we compare the signal to noise of two estimators for the power spectrum hexadecapole that require different number of FFTs and measure the bispectrum monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole. The resulting algorithm is very efficient, e.g. for the BOSS survey requires about three minutes for $\ell=0,2,4$ power spectra for scales up to $k=0.3~h/$Mpc and about fifteen additional minutes for $\ell=0,2,4$ bispectra for all scales and triangle shapes up to $k=0.2~h/$Mpc on a single core. The speed of these estimators is essential as it makes possible to compute covariance matrices from large number of realizations of mock catalogs with realistic survey characteristics, and paves the way for improved constrains of gravity on cosmological scales, inflation and galaxy bias.
  • We measure the angular clustering of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 in order to probe the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies within their dark matter halos. Specifically, we measure the angular correlation function on very small scales (7-320") in a range of luminosity threshold samples (absolute r-band magnitudes of -18 up to -21) that are constructed from the subset of SDSS that has been spectroscopically observed more than once (the so-called plate overlap region). We choose to measure angular clustering in this reduced survey footprint in order to minimize the effects of fiber collision incompleteness, which are otherwise substantial on these small scales. We model our clustering measurements using a fully numerical halo model that populates dark matter halos in N-body simulations to create realistic mock galaxy catalogs. The model has free parameters that specify both the number and spatial distribution of galaxies within their host halos. We adopt a flexible density profile for the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies that is similar to the dark matter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, except that the inner slope is allowed to vary. We find that the angular clustering of our most luminous samples (Mr< -20 and -21) suggests that luminous satellite galaxies have substantially steeper inner density profiles than NFW. Lower luminosity samples are less constraining, however, and are consistent with satellite galaxies having shallow density profiles. Our results confirm the findings of Watson et al. 2012 while using different clustering measurements and modeling methodology.
  • We use cosmological N-body simulations to investigate whether measurements of the moments of large-scale structure can yield constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We measure the variance, skewness, and kurtosis of the evolved density field from simulations with Gaussian and three different non-Gaussian initial conditions: a local model with f_NL=100, an equilateral model with f_NL=-400, and an orthogonal model with f_NL=-400. We show that the moments of the dark matter density field differ significantly between Gaussian and non-Gaussian models. We also make the measurements on mock galaxy catalogs that contain galaxies with clustering properties similar to those of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). We find that, in the case of skewness and kurtosis, galaxy bias reduces the detectability of non-Gaussianity, though we can still clearly discriminate between different models in our simulation volume. However, in the case of the variance, galaxy bias greatly amplifies the detectability of non-Gaussianity. In all cases we find that redshift distortions do not significantly affect the detectability. When we restrict our measurements to volumes equivalent to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) or Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) samples, the probability of detecting a departure from the Gaussian model is high by using measurements of the variance, but very low by using only skewness and kurtosis measurements. We find that skewness and kurtosis measurements are never likely to yield useful constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity, but future surveys should be large enough to place meaningful constraints using measurements of the galaxy variance.(Abridged)
  • The discovery of cosmic acceleration has stimulated theorists to consider dark energy or modifications to Einstein's General Relativity as possible explanations. The last decade has seen advances in theories that go beyond smooth dark energy -- modified gravity and interactions of dark energy. While the theoretical terrain is being actively explored, the generic presence of fifth forces and dark sector couplings suggests a set of distinct observational signatures. This report focuses on observations that differ from the conventional probes that map the expansion history or large-scale structure. Examples of such novel probes are: detection of scalar fields via lab experiments, tests of modified gravity using stars and galaxies in the nearby universe, comparison of lensing and dynamical masses of galaxies and clusters, and the measurements of fundamental constants at high redshift. The observational expertise involved is very broad as it spans laboratory experiments, high resolution astronomical imaging and spectroscopy and radio observations. In the coming decade, searches for these effects have the potential for discovering fundamental new physics. We discuss how the searches can be carried out using experiments that are already under way or with modest adaptations of existing telescopes or planned experiments. The accompanying paper on the Growth of Cosmic Structure describes complementary tests of gravity with observations of large-scale structure.
  • Halos are biased tracers of the dark matter distribution. It is often assumed that the patches from which halos formed are locally biased with respect to the initial fluctuation field, meaning that the halo-patch fluctuation field can be written as a Taylor series in that of the dark matter. If quantities other than the local density influence halo formation, then this Lagrangian bias will generically be nonlocal; the Taylor series must be performed with respect to these other variables as well. We illustrate the effect with Monte-Carlo simulations of a model in which halo formation depends on the local shear (the quadrupole of perturbation theory), and provide an analytic model which provides a good description of our results. Our model, which extends the excursion set approach to walks in more than one dimension, works both when steps in the walk are uncorrelated, as well as when there are correlations between steps. For walks with correlated steps, our model includes two distinct types of nonlocality: one is due to the fact that the initial density profile around a patch which is destined to form a halo must fall sufficiently steeply around it -- this introduces k-dependence to even the linear bias factor, but otherwise only affects the monopole of the clustering signal. The other is due to the surrounding shear field; this affects the quadratic and higher order bias factors, and introduces an angular dependence to the clustering signal. In both cases, our analysis shows that these nonlocal Lagrangian bias terms can be significant, particularly for massive halos; they must be accounted for in analyses of higher order clustering such as the halo bispectrum in Lagrangian or Eulerian space. Although we illustrate these effects using halos, our analysis and conclusions also apply to the other constituents of the cosmic web -- filaments, sheets and voids.
  • We develop a new test of local bias, by constructing a locally biased halo density field from sampling the dark matter-halo distribution. Our test differs from conventional tests in that it preserves the full scatter in the bias relation and it does not rely on perturbation theory. We put forward that bias parameters obtained using a smoothing scale R can only be applied to computing the halo power spectrum at scales k ~ 1/R. Our calculations can automatically include the running of bias parameters and give vanishingly small loop corrections at low-k. Our proposal results in much better agreement of the sampling and perturbation theory results with simulations. In particular, unlike the standard interpretation of local bias in the literature, our treatment of local bias does not generate a constant power in the low-k limit. We search for extra noise in the Poisson corrected halo power spectrum at wavenumbers below its turn-over and find no evidence of significant positive noise (as predicted by the standard interpretation) while we find evidence of negative noise coming from halo exclusion for very massive halos. Using perturbation theory and our non-perturbative sampling technique we also demonstrate that nonlocal bias effects discovered recently in simulations impact the power spectrum only at the few percent level in the weakly nonlinear regime.
  • We put forward and test a simple description of multi-point propagators (MP), which serve as building-blocks to calculate the nonlinear matter power spectrum. On large scales these propagators reduce to the well-known kernels in standard perturbation theory, while at smaller scales they are suppresed due to nonlinear couplings. Through extensive testing with numerical simulations we find that this decay is characterized by the same damping scale for both two and three-point propagators. In turn this transition can be well modeled with resummation results that exponentiate one-loop computations. For the first time, we measure the four components of the non-linear (two-point) propagator using dedicated simulations started from two independent random Gaussian fields for positions and velocities, verifying in detail the fundamentals of propagator resummation. We use these results to develop an implementation of the MP-expansion for the nonlinear power spectrum that only requires seconds to evaluate at BAO scales. To test it we construct six suites of large numerical simulations with different cosmologies. From these and LasDamas runs we show that the nonlinear power spectrum can be described at the ~ 2% level at BAO scales for redshifts in the range [0-2.5]. We make a public release of the MPTbreeze code with the hope that it can be useful to the community.
  • We present a new scheme for the general computation of cosmic propagators that allow to interpolate between standard perturbative results at low-k and their expected large-k resummed behavior. This scheme is applicable to any multi-point propagator and allows the matching of perturbative low-k calculations to any number of loops to their large-k behavior, and can potentially be applied in case of non-standard cosmological scenarios such as those with non-Gaussian initial conditions. The validity of our proposal is checked against previous prescriptions and measurements in numerical simulations showing a remarkably good agreement. Such a generic prescription for multi-point propagators provides the necessary building blocks for the computation of polyspectra in the context of the so-called Gamma-expansion introduced by Bernardeau et al. (2008). As a concrete application we present a consistent calculation of the matter bispectrum at one-loop order.
  • We present a fast method of producing mock galaxy catalogues that can be used to compute covariance matrices of large-scale clustering measurements and test the methods of analysis. Our method populates a 2nd-order Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (2LPT) matter field, where we calibrate masses of dark matter halos by detailed comparisons with N-body simulations. We demonstrate the clustering of halos is recovered at ~10 per cent accuracy. We populate halos with mock galaxies using a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) prescription, which has been calibrated to reproduce the clustering measurements on scales between 30 and 80 Mpc/h. We compare the sample covariance matrix from our mocks with analytic estimates, and discuss differences. We have used this method to make catalogues corresponding to Data Release 9 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS),producing 600 mock catalogues of the "CMASS" galaxy sample. These mocks enabled detailed tests of methods and errors that formed an integral part of companion analyses of these galaxy data.