• We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C-shock through a clump with preshock density 2e4/cm3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O$_2$ can explain the emission from the source if its line of sight dimension is ~10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O$_2$ emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.
  • According to traditional gas-phase chemical models, O2 should be abundant in molecular clouds, but until recently, attempts to detect interstellar O2 line emission with ground- and space-based observatories have failed. Following the multi-line detections of O2 with low abundances in the Orion and rho Oph A molecular clouds with Herschel, it is important to investigate other environments, and we here quantify the O2 abundance near a solar-mass protostar. Observations of O2, at 487 GHz toward a deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 protostar, NGC 1333-IRAS 4A, are presented, using the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Complementary data of the chemically related NO and CO molecules are obtained as well. The high spectral resolution data are analysed using radiative transfer models to infer column densities and abundances, and are tested directly against full gas-grain chemical models. The deep HIFI spectrum fails to show O2 at the velocity of the dense protostellar envelope, implying one of the lowest abundance upper limits of O2/H2 at <6x10^-9 (3 sigma). However, a tentative (4.5 sigma) detection of O2 is seen at the velocity of the surrounding NGC 1333 molecular cloud, shifted by 1 km/s relative to the protostar. For the protostellar envelope, pure gas-phase models and gas-grain chemical models require a long pre-collapse phase (~0.7-1x10^6 years), during which atomic and molecular oxygen are frozen out onto dust grains and fully converted to H2O, to avoid overproduction of O2 in the dense envelope. The same model also reproduces the limits on the chemically related NO molecule. The tentative detection of O2 in the surrounding cloud is consistent with a low-density PDR model with small changes in reaction rates. The low O2 abundance in the collapsing envelope around a low-mass protostar suggests that the gas and ice entering protoplanetary disks is very poor in O2.
  • The 100 square degree FCRAO CO survey of the Taurus molecular cloud provides an excellent opportunity to undertake an unbiased survey of a large, nearby, molecular cloud complex for molecular outflow activity. Our study provides information on the extent, energetics and frequency of outflows in this region, which are then used to assess the impact of outflows on the parent molecular cloud. The search identified 20 outflows in the Taurus region, 8 of which were previously unknown. Both $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO data cubes from the Taurus molecular map were used, and dynamical properties of the outflows are derived. Even for previously known outflows, our large-scale maps indicate that many of the outflows are much larger than previously suspected, with eight of the flows (40%) being more than a parsec long. The mass, momentum and kinetic energy from the 20 outflows are compared to the repository of turbulent energy in Taurus. Comparing the energy deposition rate from outflows to the dissipation rate of turbulence, we conclude that outflows by themselves cannot sustain the observed turbulence seen in the entire cloud. However, when the impact of outflows is studied in selected regions of Taurus, it is seen that locally, outflows can provide a significant source of turbulence and feedback. Five of the eight newly discovered outflows have no known associated stellar source, indicating that they may be embedded Class 0 sources. In Taurus, 30% of Class I sources and 12% of Flat spectrum sources from the Spitzer YSO catalogue have outflows, while 75% of known Class 0 objects have outflows. Overall, the paucity of outflows in Taurus compared to the embedded population of Class I and Flat Spectrum YSOs indicate that molecular outflows are a short-lived stage marking the youngest phase of protostellar life.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.
  • The FCRAO Survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud observed the 12CO and 13CO J=1-0 emission from 98 square degrees of this important, nearby star forming region. This set of data with 45" resolution comprises the highest spatial dynamic range image of an individual molecular cloud constructed to date, and provides valuable insights to the molecular gas distribution, kinematics, and the star formation process. In this contribution, we describe the observations, calibration, data processing, and characteristics of the noise and line emission of the survey. The angular distribution of 12CO and 13CO emission over 1 km/s velocity intervals and the full velocity extent of the cloud are presented. These reveal a complex, dynamic medium of cold, molecular gas.
  • We report the results of a 100 square degree survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud region in the J = 1-0 transition of 12CO and 13CO. The image of the cloud in each velocity channel includes ~ 3 million Nyquist sampled pixels on a 20" grid. The high sensitivity and large linear dynamic range of the maps in both isotopologues reveal a very complex, highly structured cloud morphology. There are large scale correlated structures evident in 13CO emission having very fine dimensions, including filaments, cavities, and rings. The 12CO emission shows a quite different structure, with particularly complex interfaces between regions of greater and smaller column density defining the boundaries of the largest-scale cloud structures. The axes of the striations seen in the 12CO emission from relatively diffuse gas are aligned with the direction of the magnetic field. Using a column density-dependent model for the CO fractional abundance, we derive the mass of the region mapped to be 24,000 solar masses, a factor of three greater than would be obtained with canonical CO abundance restricted to the high column density regions. We determine that half the mass of the cloud is in regions having column density below 2.1x10^{21} per square cm. The distribution of young stars in the region covered is highly nonuniform, with the probability of finding a star in a pixel with a specified column density rising sharply for N(H2) = 6x10^{21} cm^{-2}. We determine a relatively low star formation efficiency (mass of young stars/mass of molecular gas), between 0.3 and 1.2 %, and an average star formation rate during the past 3 Myr of 8x10^{-5} stars yr^{-1}.