• In all known fermionic superfluids, Cooper pairs are composed of spin-1/2 quasi-particles that pair to form either spin-singlet or spin-triplet bound states. The "spin" of a Bloch electron, however, is fixed by the symmetries of the crystal and the atomic orbitals from which it is derived, and in some cases can behave as if it were a spin-3/2 particle. The superconducting state of such a system allows pairing beyond spin-triplet, with higher spin quasi-particles combining to form quintet or septet pairs. Here, we report evidence of unconventional superconductivity emerging from a spin-3/2 quasiparticle electronic structure in the half-Heusler semimetal YPtBi, a low-carrier density noncentrosymmetric cubic material with a high symmetry that preserves the $p$-like $j=3/2$ manifold in the Bi-based $\Gamma_8$ band in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. With a striking linear temperature dependence of the London penetration depth, the existence of line nodes in the superconducting order parameter $\Delta$ is directly explained by a mixed-parity Cooper pairing model with high total angular momentum, consistent with a high-spin fermionic superfluid state. We propose a $\mathbf{k\cdot p}$ model of the $j=3/2$ fermions to explain how a dominant $J$=3 septet pairing state is the simplest solution that naturally produces nodes in the mixed even-odd parity gap. Together with the underlying topologically non-trivial band structure, the unconventional pairing in this system represents a truly novel form of superfluidity that has strong potential for leading the development of a new generation of topological superconductors.
  • The multiferroic hexagonal rare-earth manganites h-REMnO$_3$ display a diverse array of magnetic phenomena, as many contain both rare-earth and Mn magnetic moments which interact in a low symmetry crystal structure. Of these materials h-HoMnO$_3$ (HMO) possesses the largest rare-earth magnetic moment and is therefore ideal for investigating magnetic exchange in hexagonal manganites. In this work, time-domain THz spectroscopy experiments uncover evidence for exceptionally strong and unconventional Ho-Mn spin interactions in HMO through careful examination of an antiferromagnetic resonance (AFR) of the Mn sublattice. Experiments reveal the AFR to split asymmetrically in magnetic field with substantially different $g$-factors for the high and low energy branches of this excitation. The temperature dependence reveals this asymmetry to be related to the Ho sublattice magnetization. Furthermore, we uncover a drastic renormalization of the $g$-factors of the Mn AFR at the Ho spin ordering temperature, confirming strong Ho-Mn coupling. Theoretical calculations demonstrate these results are not explained by conventional exchange mechanisms and therefore suggest a new Ho-Mn spin interaction in HMO. Our results provide a paradigm for the optical study of such spin interactions in other hexagonal manganites.
  • Domain walls (DWs) in ferroic materials, across which the order parameter abruptly changes its orientation, can host emergent properties that are absent in the bulk domains. Using a broadband ($10^6-10^{10}$ Hz) scanning impedance microscope, we show that the electrical response of the interlocked antiphase boundaries and ferroelectric domain walls in hexagonal rare-earth manganites ($h-RMnO_3$) is dominated by the bound-charge oscillation rather than free-carrier conduction at the DWs. As a measure of the rate of energy dissipation, the effective conductivity of DWs on the (001) surfaces of $h-RMnO_3$ at GHz frequencies is drastically higher than that at dc, while the effect is absent on surfaces with in-plane polarized domains. First-principles and model calculations indicate that the frequency range and selection rules are consistent with the periodic sliding of the DW around its equilibrium position. This acoustic-wave-like mode, which is associated with the synchronized oscillation of local polarization and apical oxygen atoms, is localized perpendicular to the DW but free to propagate along the DW plane. Our results break the ground to understand structural DW dynamics and exploit new interfacial phenomena for novel devices.
  • Kondo insulator FeSb$_2$ with large Seebeck coefficient would have potential in thermoelectric applications in cryogenic temperature range if it had not been for large thermal conductivity $\kappa$. Here we studied the influence of different chemical substitutions at Fe and Sb site on thermal conductivity and thermoelectric effect in high quality single crystals. At $5\%$ of Te doping at Sb site thermal conductivity is suppressed from $\sim 250$ W/Km in undoped sample to about 8 W/Km. However, Cr and Co doping at Fe site suppresses thermal conductivity more slowly than Te doping, and even at 20$\%$ Cr/Co doping the thermal conductivity remains $\sim 30$ W/Km. The analysis of different contributions to phonon scattering indicates that the giant suppression of $\kappa$ with Te is due to the enhanced point defect scattering originating from the strain field fluctuations. In contrast, Te-doping has small influence on the correlation effects and then for small Te substitution the large magnitude of the Seebeck coefficient is still preserved, leading to the enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit ($ZT\sim 0.05$ at $\sim 100$ K) in Fe(Sb$_{0.9}$Te$_{0.1}$)$_2$.
  • We report on the emergence of an Electronic Griffiths Phase (EGP) in the doped semiconductor FeSb$_{2}$, predicted for disordered insulators with random localized moments in the vicinity of a metal-insulator transition (MIT). Magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic measurements of Fe(Sb$_{1-x}$Te$_{x}$)$_{2}$ single crystals show signatures of disorder-induced non-Fermi liquid behavior and a Wilson ratio expected for strong electronic correlations. The EGP states are found on the metallic boundary, between the insulating state ($x = 0$) and a long-range albeit weak magnetic order ($x \geq 0.075$).
  • We report on high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of magnetic excitations in the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs$_2$CuBr$_4$. Frequency-field diagrams of ESR excitations are measured for different orientations of magnetic fields up to 25 T. We show that the substantial zero-field energy gap, $\Delta\approx9.5$ K, observed in the low-temperature excitation spectrum of Cs$_2$CuBr$_4$ [Zvyagin $et~al.$, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 077206 (2014)], is present well above $T_N$. Noticeably, the transition into the long-range magnetically ordered phase does not significantly affect the size of the gap, suggesting that even below $T_N$ the high-energy spin dynamics in Cs$_2$CuBr$_4$ is determined by short-range-order spin correlations. The experimental data are compared with results of model spin-wave-theory calculations for spin-1/2 triangle-lattice antiferromagnet.
  • Superconductivity results from a Bose condensate of Cooper-paired electrons with a macroscopic quantum wavefunction. Dramatic effects can occur when the region of the condensate is shaped and confined to the nanometer scale. Recent progress in nanostructured superconductors has revealed a route to topological superconductivity, with possible applications in quantum computing. However, challenges remain in controlling the shape and size of specific superconducting materials. Here, we report a new method to create nanostructured superconductors by partial crystallization of the half-Heusler material, YPtBi. Superconducting islands, with diameters in the range of 100 nm, were reproducibly created by local current annealing of disordered YPtBi in the tunneling junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). We characterize the superconducting island properties by scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to determine the gap energy, critical temperature and field, coherence length, and vortex formations. These results show unique properties of a confined superconductor and demonstrate that this new method holds promise to create tailored superconductors for a wide variety of nanometer scale applications.
  • We report superconductivity and magnetism in a new family of topological semimetals, the ternary half Heusler compounds $R$PdBi ($R$ : rare earth). In this series, tuning of the rare earth $f$-electron component allows for simultaneous control of both lattice density via lanthanide contraction, as well as the strength of magnetic interaction via de Gennes scaling, allowing for a unique tuning of both the normal state band inversion strength, superconducting pairing and magnetically ordered ground states. Antiferromagnetism with ordering vector (0.5,0.5,0.5) occurs below a Ne\'eel temperature that scales with de Gennes factor $dG$, while a superconducting transition is simultaneously linearly suppressed. With superconductivity appearing in a system with non-centrosymmetric crystallographic symmetry, the possibility of spin-triplet Cooper pairing with non-trivial topology analogous to that predicted for the normal state electronic structure provides a unique and rich opportunity to realize both predicted and new exotic excitations in topological materials.
  • We report neutron scattering measurements, which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in a '11' iron chalcogenide superconductor, a poorly-metallic magnetic FeTe tuned towards superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of Tellurium with iso-electronic Sulphur. We observe liquid-like magnetic dynamics, which is described by a competition of two phases with different local structure, whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in the non-superconducting FeTe, which preserves the C$_4$ symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures. The other is the antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C$_4$ symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in the electronic spin system of FeTe$_{1-x}$(S,Se)$_x$. We thus discover remarkable new physics of competing spin liquid polymorphs in a correlated electron system approaching superconductivity. Our results facilitate an understanding of large swaths of recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors.
  • Neutron scattering techniques are used to investigate the crystalline and magnetic structure of LuFe$_{0.75}$Mn$_{0.25}$O$_{3}$ in bulk polycrystalline form. We find that the crystalline structure is described by the hexagonal P6$_{3}$cm space group similar to that of thin-film LuFeO$_{3}$, and that the system orders antiferromagnetically below T$_{N}$ = 134 K. Inelastic neutron scattering reveals nearest-neighbor superexchange parameters that are enhanced relative to LuMnO$_{3}$. The observation of significant diffuse scattering above T$_{N}$ demonstrates the frustrated nature of the system; comparisons with similar materials suggest the ground state magnetic configuration is sensitive to local crystallographic distortions.
  • The London penetration depth, $\lambda (T)$ was measured in single crystals of Ce$_{1-x}R_x$CoIn$_5$, $R$=La, Nd and Yb down to 50~mK ($T_c/T \sim$50) using a tunnel-diode resonator. In the cleanest samples $\Delta \lambda (T)$ is best described by the power law, $\Delta \lambda (T) \propto T^{n}$, with $n \sim 1$, consistent with line nodes. Substitutions of Ce with La, Nd and Yb lead to similar monotonic suppressions of $T_c$, however the effects on $\Delta \lambda(T)$ differ. While La and Nd doping results in an increase of the exponent to $n \sim 2$, as expected for a dirty nodal superconductor, Yb doping leads to $n > 3$, inconsistent with nodes, suggesting a change from nodal to nodeless superconductivity where Fermi surface topology changes were reported, implying that the nodal structure and Fermi surface topology are closely linked.
  • The in-plane thermal conductivity kappa(T) and electrical resistivity rho(T) of the heavy-fermion metal YbRh2Si2 were measured down to 50 mK for magnetic fields H parallel and perpendicular to the tetragonal c axis, through the field-tuned quantum critical point, Hc, at which antiferromagnetic order ends. The thermal and electrical resistivities, w(T) and rho(T), show a linear temperature dependence below 1 K, typical of the non-Fermi liquid behavior found near antiferromagnetic quantum critical points, but this dependence does not persist down to T = 0. Below a characteristic temperature T* ~ 0.35 K, which depends weakly on H, w(T) and rho(T) both deviate downward and converge in the T = 0 limit. We propose that T* marks the onset of short-range magnetic correlations, persisting beyond Hc. By comparing samples of different purity, we conclude that the Wiedemann-Franz law holds in YbRh2Si2, even at Hc, implying that no fundamental breakdown of quasiparticle behavior occurs in this material. The overall phenomenology of heat and charge transport in YbRh2Si2 is similar to that observed in the heavy-fermion metal CeCoIn5, near its own field-tuned quantum critical point.
  • We show that synthesis-induced Metal -Insulator transition (MIT) for electronic transport along the orthorombic c axis of FeSb$_{2}$ single crystals has greatly enhanced electrical conductivity while keeping the thermopower at a relatively high level. By this means, the thermoelectric power factor is enhanced to a new record high S$^{2}$$\sigma$ $\sim$ 8000 $\mu$WK$^{-2}$cm$^{-1}$ at 28 K. We find that the large thermopower in FeSb$_{2}$ can be rationalized within the correlated electron model with two bands having large quasiparaticle disparity, whereas MIT is induced by subtle structural differences. The results in this work testify that correlated electrons can produce extreme power factor values.
  • We present the upper critical fields Hc2(T) and Hall effect in beta-FeSe single crystals. The Hc2(T) increases as the temperature is lowered for field applied parallel and perpendicular to (101), the natural growth facet of the crystal. The Hc2(T) for both field directions and the anisotropy at low temperature increase under pressure. Hole carriers are dominant at high magnetic fields. However, the contribution of electron-type carriers is significant at low fields and low temperature. Our results show that multiband effects dominate Hc2(T) and electronic transport in the normal state.
  • In this article we review our studies of the K0.80Fe1.76Se2 superconductor, with an attempt to elucidate the crystal growth details and basic physical properties over a wide range of temperatures and applied magnetic field, including anisotropic magnetic and electrical transport properties, thermodynamic, London penetration depth, magneto-optical imaging and Mossbauer measurements. We find that: (i) Single crystals of similar stoichiometry can be grown both by furnace-cooled and decanted methods; (ii) Single crystalline K0.80Fe1.76Se2 shows moderate anisotropy in both magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity and a small modulation of stoichiometry of the crystal, which gives rise to broadened transitions; (iii) The upper critical field, Hc2(T) is ~ 55 T at 2 K for H||c, manifesting a temperature dependent anisotropy that peaks near 3.6 at 27 K and drops to 2.5 by 18 K; (iv) Mossbauer measurements reveal that the iron sublattice in K0.80Fe1.76Se2 clearly exhibits magnetic order, probably of the first order, from well below Tc to its Neel temperature of Tn = 532 +/- 2 K. It is very important to note that, although, at first glance there is an apparent dilemma posed by these data: high Tc superconductivity in a near insulating, large ordered moment material, analysis indicates that the sample may well consist of two phases with the minority superconducting phase (that does not exhibit magnetic order) being finely distributed, but connected with in an antiferromagnetic, poorly conducting, matrix, essentially making a superconducting aerogel.
  • We report magnetic susceptibility, resistivity and heat capacity measurements on single crystals of the Sr(Fe1-xCox)2As2 and Sr1-yEuy(Fe0.88Co0.12)2As2 series. The optimal Co concentration for superconductivity in Sr(Fe1-xCox)2As2 is determined to be x ~ 0.12. Based on this we grew members of the Sr1-yEuy(Fe0.88Co0.12)2As2 series so as to examine the effects of well defined, local magnetic moments, on the superconducting state. We show that superconductivity is gradually suppressed by paramagnetic Eu2+ doping and coexists with antiferromagnetic ordering of Eu2+ as long as Tc > TN. For y >= 0.65, TN crosses Tc and the superconducting ground state (as manifested by zero resistivity) abruptly disappears with evidence for competition between superconductivity and local moment antiferromagnetism for y up to 0.72. It is speculated that the suppression of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations of Fe sublattice by coupling to the long range order of Eu2+ sublattice destroys bulk superconductivity when TN > Tc.
  • We report the single crystal growth of Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (0 <= x <= 0.082) from Sn flux. The temperature-composition phase diagram is mapped out based on the magnetic susceptibility and electrical transport measurements. Phase diagram of Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 is qualitatively different from those of Sr and Ba, it could be due to both the charge doping and structural tuning effects associated with Co substitution.
  • The upper critical fields, Hc2 of single crystals of Sr1-xEux(Fe0.89Co0.11)2As2(x=0.203 and 0.463) were determined by radio frequency penetration depth measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. Hc2 approaches the Pauli limiting field but shows an upward curvature with an enhancement from the orbital limited field as inferred from Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory. We discuss the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields and the decreasing anisotropy using a two-band BCS model.
  • The lattice dynamics of FeSb2 is investigated by the first-principles DFT calculations and Raman spectroscopy. All Raman and infra-red active phonon modes are properly assigned. The calculated and measured phonon energies are in good agreement except for the B3g symmetry mode. We have observed strong mixing of the Ag symmetry modes, with the intensity exchange in the temperature range between 210 K and 260 K. The Ag modes repulsion increases by doping FeSb2 with Co. There are no signatures of the electron-phonon interaction for these modes.
  • We present critical fields, thermally-activated flux flow (TAFF) and critical current density of tetragonal phase beta-FeSe single crystals. The upper critical fields Hc2(T) for H||(101) and H\bot(101) are nearly isotropic and are likely governed by Pauli limiting process. The obtained large Ginzburg-Landau parameter k \sim 72.3(2) indicates that beta-FeSe is a type-II superconductor with smaller penetration depth than in Fe(Te,Se). The resistivity below Tc follows Arrhenius TAFF behavior. For both field directions below 30 kOe single vortex pinning is dominant whereas collective creep becomes important above 30 kOe. The critical current density Jc from M-H loops for H||(101) is about five times larger than for H\bot(101), yet much smaller than in other iron-based superconductors.
  • Understanding iron based superconductors requires high quality impurity free single crystals. So far they have been elusive for beta-FeSe and extraction of intrinsic materials properties has been compromised by several magnetic impurity phases. Herein we report synchrotron - clean beta-FeSe superconducting single crystals grown via LiCl/CsCl flux method. Phase purity yields evidence for a defect induced weak ferromagnetism that coexists with superconductivity below Tc. In contrast to Fe1+yTe - based superconductors, our results reveal that the interstitial Fe(2) site is not occupied and that all contribution to density of states at the Fermi level must come from in-plane Fe(1).
  • We report inelastic neutron scattering measurements aimed at investigating the origin of the temperature-induced paramagnetism in the narrow-gap semiconductor FeSb2. We find that inelastic response for energies up to 60 meV and at temperatures 4.2 K, 300 K and 550 K is essentially consistent with the scattering by lattice phonon excitations. We observe no evidence for a well-defined magnetic peak corresponding to the excitation from the non-magnetic S = 0 singlet ground state to a state of magnetic multiplet in the localized spin picture. Our data establish the quantitative limit of S_{eff}^2 < 0.25 on the fluctuating local spin. However, a broad magnetic scattering continuum in the 15 meV to 35 meV energy range is not ruled out by our data. Our findings make description in terms of the localized Fe spins unlikely and suggest that paramagnetic susceptibility of itinerant electrons is at the origin of the temperature-induced magnetism in FeSb2.
  • Kondo insulator like material FeSb2 was found to exhibit colossal Seebeck coefficient. It would have had huge potential in thermoelectric applications in cryogenic temperature range if it had not been for the large thermal conductivity. Here we studied the influence of Te doping at Sb site on thermal conductivity and thermoelectric effect in high quality single crystals. Surprisingly, only 5% Te doping suppresses thermal conductivity by two orders of magnitude, which may be attributed to the substitution disorder. Te doping also results in transition from an semiconductor to a metal. Consequently thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT ? 0:05) in Fe(Sb0:9Te0:1)2 at ? 100K was enhanced by about one order of magnitude when compared to ZT < 0:005 in undoped FeSb2.
  • We have measured polarized Raman scattering spectra of the Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$Sb$_{2}$ and Fe$_{1-x}$Cr$_{x}$Sb$_{2}$ (0$\leq x\leq $0.5) single crystals in the temperature range between 15 K and 300 K. The highest energy $B_{1g}$ symmetry mode shows significant line asymmetry due to phonon mode coupling width electronic background. The coupling constant achieves the highest value at about 40 K and after that it remains temperature independent. Origin of additional mode broadening is pure anharmonic. Below 40 K the coupling is drastically reduced, in agreement with transport properties measurements. Alloying of FeSb$_2$ with Co and Cr produces the B$_{1g}$ mode narrowing, i.e. weakening of the electron-phonon interaction. In the case of A$_{g}$ symmetry modes we have found a significant mode mixing.
  • The vibrational properties of ErTe$_3$ were investigated using Raman spectroscopy and analyzed on the basis of peculiarities of the RTe$_3$ crystal structure. Four Raman active modes for the undistorted structure, predicted by factor-group analysis, are experimentally observed and assigned according to diperiodic symmetry of the ErTe$_3$ layer. By analyzing temperature dependence of the Raman mode energy and intensity we have provided the clear evidence that all Raman modes, active in the normal phase, are coupled to the charge density waves. In addition, new modes have been observed in the distorted state.