• The nature of the ground state of the spin $S=1/2$ Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the kagome lattice with breathing anisotropy (i.e., with different superexchange couplings $J_{\vartriangle}$ and $J_{\triangledown}$ within elementary up- and down-pointing triangles) is investigated within the framework of Gutzwiller projected fermionic wave functions and Monte Carlo methods. We analyze the stability of the U(1) Dirac spin liquid with respect to the presence of fermionic pairing that leads to a gapped $\mathbb{Z}_{2}$ spin liquid. For several values of the ratio $J_{\triangledown}/J_{\vartriangle}$, the size scaling of the energy gain due to the pairing fields and the variational parameters are reported. Our results show that the energy gain of the gapped spin liquid with respect to the gapless state either vanishes for large enough system size or scales to zero in the thermodynamic limit. Similarly, the optimized pairing amplitudes (responsible for opening the spin gap) are shown to vanish in the thermodynamic limit. Our outcome is corroborated by the application of one and two Lanczos steps to the gapless and gapped wave functions, for which no energy gain of the gapped state is detected when improving the quality of the variational states. Finally, we discuss the competition with the "simplex" $\mathbb{Z}_{2}$ resonating-valence-bond spin liquid, valence-bond crystal, and nematic states in the strongly anisotropic regime, i.e., $J_{\triangledown} \ll J_{\vartriangle}$.
  • Weyl semimetals are characterized by Fermi arc surface states. As a function of surface momentum, such arcs constitute energy-degenerate line trajectories terminating at the surface projection of two bulk Weyl nodes with opposite chirality. At these projection points, the Fermi arc transcends into a bulk state, and as such yields an intricate connectivity of surface-localized and bulk-delocalized states. Spectroscopic approaches face the challenge to efficiently image this surface-bulk transition of the Fermi arcs for topological semimetals in general. Here, employing a joint analysis from orbital-selective angle-resolved photoemission and first-principles calculations, we unveil the orbital texture on the full Fermi surface of TaP. We put forward a diagnosis scheme to formulate and measure the orbital fingerprint of topological Fermi arcs and their surface-bulk transition in a Weyl semimetal.
  • Due to their large bulk band gap, bismuthene, antimonene, and arsenene on a SiC substrate offer intriguing new opportunities for room-temperature quantum spin Hall (QSH) applications. Although edge states have been observed in the local density of states (LDOS) of bismuthene/SiC, there has been no experimental evidence until now that they are spin-polarized and topologically protected. Here, we show that for experimentally relevant armchair nanoribbons, we find a distinct behavior of the gap induced in the QSH edge states for out-of-plane magnetic fields (a few meV) versus in-plane magnetic fields (negligible gap) which is the hallmark of their topological origin. Further, we predict experimentally testable fingerprints of this behavior in the LDOS and in ballistic magnetotransport. While we focus on bismuthene/SiC, our main findings are also applicable to other honeycomb-based QSH systems.
  • Topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) exhibit bulk Dirac cones protected by time reversal and crystal symmetry, as well as surface states originating from non-trivial topology. While there is a manifold possible onset of superconducting order in such systems, few observations of intrinsic superconductivity have so far been reported for TDSs. We observe evidence for a TDS phase in FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ ($x$ = 0.45), one of the high transition temperature ($T_c$) iron-based superconductors. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and transport experiments, we find spin-polarized states overlapping with the bulk states on the (001) surface, and linear magnetoresistance (MR) starting from 6 T. Combined, this strongly suggests the existence of a TDS phase, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations. In total, the topological electronic states in Fe(Te,Se) provide a promising high $T_c$ platform to realize multiple topological superconducting phases.
  • Topological insulators/semimetals and unconventional iron-based superconductors have attracted major attentions in condensed matter physics in the past 10 years. However, there is little overlap between these two fields, although the combination of topological states and superconducting states will produce more exotic topologically superconducting states and Majorana bound states (MBS), a promising candidate for realizing topological quantum computations. With the progress in laser-based spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with very high energy- and momentum-resolution, we directly resolved the topological insulator (TI) phase and topological Dirac semimetal (TDS) phase near Fermi level ($E_F$) in the iron-based superconductor Li(Fe,Co)As. The TI and TDS phases can be separately tuned to $E_F$ by Co doping, allowing a detailed study of different superconducting topological states in the same material. Together with the topological states in Fe(Te,Se), our study shows the ubiquitous coexistence of superconductivity and multiple topological phases in iron-based superconductors, and opens a new age for the study of high-Tc iron-based superconductors and topological superconductivity.
  • We investigate the quantum Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice for a generic spin-$S$ in the presence of nearest-neighbor $J_{1}$ and second-nearest-neighbor $J_{2}$ exchange interactions. By employing the pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) method, we find, for $S=1/2$ and $S=1$, an extended quantum spin liquid phase centered around $J_{2}=0$, which is shown to be robust against the introduction of breathing anisotropy. The effects of temperature, quantum fluctuations, breathing anisotropies, and a $J_{2}$ coupling on the nature of the scattering profile, in particular, the pinch points are studied. For the magnetic phases of the $J_{1}$-$J_{2}$ model, quantum fluctuations are shown to strongly renormalize phase boundaries compared to the classical model and shift the ordering wave vectors of spiral magnetic states, however, no new magnetic orders are found to be stabilized.
  • We describe a general method to identify exact, local parent Hamiltonians for trial states like quantum Hall or spin liquid states, which we have used extensively during the past decade. It can be used to identify exact parent Hamiltonians, either directly or via the construction of simpler annihilation operators from which a parent Hamiltonian respecting all the required symmetries can be constructed. Most remarkably, however, the method provides approximate parent Hamiltonians whenever an exact solution is not available within the space of presumed interaction terms.
  • We investigate the stability of the spiral spin-liquid phase in MnSc$_2$S$_4$ against thermal and quantum fluctuations as well as against perturbing effects of longer-range interactions. Employing $ab~initio$ DFT calculations we propose a realistic Hamiltonian for MnSc$_2$S$_4$, featuring second ($J_2$) and third $(J_3)$ neighbor Heisenberg interactions on the diamond lattice that are considerably larger than previously assumed. We argue that the combination of strong $J_2$ and $J_3$ couplings reproduces the correct magnetic Bragg peak position measured experimentally. Calculating the spin-structure factor within the pseudofermion functional-renormalization group technique we find that close to the magnetic phase transition the sizeable $J_3$ couplings induce a strong spiral selection effect, in agreement with experiments. With increasing temperature the spiral selection becomes weaker such that around three times the ordering temperature an approximate spiral spin-liquid is realized in MnSc$_2$S$_4$.
  • Anomalous surface states with Fermi arcs are commonly considered to be a fingerprint of Dirac semimetals (DSMs). In contrast to Weyl semimetals, however, Fermi arcs of DSMs are not topologically protected. Using first-principles calculations, we predict that $\beta$-CuI is a peculiar DSM whose surface states form closed Fermi pockets instead of Fermi arcs. In such a fermiological Dirac semimetal, the deformation mechanism from Fermi arcs to Fermi pockets stems from a large cubic term preserving all crystal symmetries, and the small energy difference between the surface and bulk Dirac points. The cubic term in $\beta$-CuI, usually negligible in prototypical DSMs, becomes relevant because of the particular crystal structure. As such, we establish a concrete material example manifesting the lack of topological protection for surface Fermi arcs in DSMs
  • Motivated by recent experiments, we investigate the pressure-dependent electronic structure and electron-phonon (\emph{e-ph}) coupling for simple cubic phosphorus by performing first-principle calculations within the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. As a function of increasing pressure, our calculations show a valley feature in T$_c$, followed by an eventual decrease for higher pressures. We demonstrate that this T$_c$ valley at low pressures is due to two nearby Lifshitz transitions, as we analyze the band-resolved contributions to the \emph{e-ph} coupling. Below the first Lifshitz transition, the phonon hardening and shrinking of the $\gamma$ Fermi surface with $s$ orbital character results in a decreased T$_c$ with increasing pressure. After the second Lifshitz transition, the appearance of $\delta$ Fermi surfaces with $3d$ orbital character generate strong \emph{e-ph} inter-band couplings in $\alpha\delta$ and $\beta\delta$ channels, and hence lead to an increase of T$_c$. For higher pressures, the phonon hardening finally dominates, and T$_c$ decreases again. Our study reveals that the intriguing T$_c$} valley discovered in experiment can be attributed to Lifshitz transitions, while the plateau of T$_c$ detected at intermediate pressures appears to be beyond the scope of our analysis. This strongly suggests that besides \emph{e-ph} coupling, electronic correlations along with plasmonic contributions may be relevant for simple cubic phosphorous. Our findings hint at the notion that increasing pressure can shift the low-energy orbital weight towards $d$ character, and as such even trigger an enhanced importance of orbital-selective electronic correlations despite an increase of the overall bandwidth.
  • Na$_2$IrO$_3$ was one of the first materials proposed to feature the Kane-Mele type topological insulator phase. Contemporaneously it was claimed that the very same material is in a Mott insulating phase which is described by the Kitaev-Heisenberg (KH) model. First experiments indeed revealed Mott insulating behavior in conjunction with antiferromagnetic long-range order. Further refined experiments established antiferromagnetic order of zigzag type which is not captured by the KH model. Since then several extensions and modifications of the KH model were proposed in order to describe the experimental findings. Here we suggest that adding charge fluctuations to the KH model represents an alternative explanation of zigzag antiferromagnetism. Moreover, a phenomenological three-band Hubbard model unifies all the pieces of the puzzle: topological insulator physics for weak and KH model for strong electron-electron interactions as well as a zigzag antiferromagnet at intermediate interaction strength.
  • Invented by Alessandro Volta and F\'elix Savary in the early 19th century, circuits consisting of resistor, inductor and capacitor (RLC) components are omnipresent in modern technology. The behavior of an RLC circuit is governed by its circuit Laplacian, which is analogous to the Hamiltonian describing the energetics of a physical system. We show that topological semimetal band structures can be realized as admittance bands in a periodic RLC circuit, where we employ the grounding to adjust the spectral position of the bands similar to the chemical potential in a material. Topological boundary resonances (TBRs) appear in the impedance read-out of a topolectrical circuit, providing a robust signal for the presence of topological admittance bands. For experimental illustration, we build the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger circuit, where our impedance measurement detects a TBR related to the midgap state. Due to the versatility of electronic circuits, our topological semimetal construction can be generalized to band structures with arbitrary lattice symmetry. Topolectrical circuits establish a bridge between electrical engineering and topological states of matter, where the accessibility, scalability, and operability of electronics synergizes with the intricate boundary properties of topological phases.
  • Quantized electric quadrupole insulators have recently been proposed as novel quantum states of matter in two spatial dimensions. Gapped otherwise, they can feature zero-dimensional topological corner mid-gap states protected by the bulk spectral gap, reflection symmetries and a spectral symmetry. Here we introduce a topolectrical circuit design for realizing such corner modes experimentally and report measurements in which the modes appear as topological boundary resonances in the corner impedance profile of the circuit. Whereas the quantized bulk quadrupole moment of an electronic crystal does not have a direct analogue in the classical topolectrical-circuit framework, the corner modes inherit the identical form from the quantum case. Due to the flexibility and tunability of electrical circuits, they are an ideal platform for studying the reflection symmetry-protected character of corner modes in detail. Our work therefore establishes an instance where topolectrical circuitry is employed to bridge the gap between quantum theoretical modelling and the experimental realization of topological band structures.
  • We theoretically investigate the low-temperature phase of the recently synthesized Lu$_2$Mo$_2$O$_5$N$_2$ material, an extraordinarily rare realization of a $S=1/2$ three-dimensional pyrochlore Heisenberg antiferromagnet in which Mo$^{5+}$ are the $S=1/2$ magnetic species. Despite a Curie-Weiss temperature ($\Theta_{\rm CW}$) of $-121(1)$ K, experiments have found no signature of magnetic ordering $or$ spin-freezing down to $T^*$$\approx$$0.5$ K. Using density functional theory, we find that the compound is well described by a Heisenberg model with exchange parameters up to third nearest-neighbors. The analysis of this model via the pseudofermion functional renormalization group method reveals paramagnetic behavior down to a temperature of at least $T=|\Theta_{\rm CW}|/100$, in agreement with the experimental findings hinting at a possible three-dimensional quantum spin liquid. The spin susceptibility profile in reciprocal space shows momentum-dependent features forming a "gearwheel" pattern, characterizing what may be viewed as a molten version of a chiral non-coplanar incommensurate spiral order under the action of quantum fluctuations. Our calculated reciprocal space susceptibility maps provide benchmarks for future neutron scattering experiments on single crystals of Lu$_2$Mo$_2$O$_5$N$_2$.
  • The intricate interplay of interactions and Fermiology can give rise to a close competition between nodeless (e.g. s-wave) and nodal (e.g. d-wave) order in electronically driven unconventional superconductors. We analyze how such a scenario is affected by a Zeeman magnetic field $H_{\text{Z}}$ and temperature $T$. In the neighborhood of a zero temperature first order critical point separating a nodal from a nodeless phase, the phase boundary at low $H_{\text{Z}}$ and/or low $T$ has a universal line shape cubic in $H_{\text{Z}}$ or $T$, such that the nodal state is stabilized at the expense of the nodeless. We calculate this line shape for a model of competing s_\pm-wave and d-wave pairing in iron-based superconductors.
  • Double Dirac fermions have recently been identified as possible quasiparticles hosted by three-dimensional crystals with particular non-symmorphic point group symmetries. Applying a combined approach of ab-initio methods and dynamical mean field theory, we investigate how interactions and double Dirac band topology conspire to form the electronic quantum state of Bi$_2$CuO$_4$. We derive a downfolded eight-band model of the pristine material at low energies around the Fermi level. By tuning the model parameters from the free band structure to the realistic strongly correlated regime, we find a persistence of the double Dirac dispersion until its constituting time reveral symmetry is broken due to the onset of magnetic ordering at the Mott transition. We analyze pressure as a promising route to realize a double-Dirac metal in Bi$_2$CuO$_4$.
  • As lattice analogs of fractional quantum Hall systems, fractional Chern insulators (FCIs) exhibit enigmatic physical properties resulting from the intricate interplay between single-body and many-body physics. In particular, the design of ideal Chern band structures as hosts for FCIs necessitates the joint consideration of energy, topology, and quantum geometry of the Chern band. We devise an analytical optimization scheme that generates prototypical FCI models satisfying the criteria of band flatness, homogeneous Berry curvature, and isotropic quantum geometry. This is accomplished by adopting a holomorphic coordinate representation of the Bloch states spanning the basis of the Chern band. The resultant FCI models not only exhibit extensive tunability despite having only few adjustable parameters, but are also amenable to analytically controlled truncation schemes to accommodate any desired constraint on the maximum hopping range or density-density interaction terms. Together, our approach provides a starting point for engineering ideal FCI models that are robust in the face of specifications imposed by analytical, numerical, or experimental implementation.
  • The microscopic mechanism and the experimental identification of it in unconventional superconductors is one of the most vexing problems of contemporary condensed matter physics. We show that Raman spectroscopy provides a new avenue for this quest by probing the structure of the pairing interaction. As a prototypical example, we study the doping dependence of the Raman spectra in different symmetry channels in the s-wave superconductor ${\rm Ba_{1-x}K_xFe_2As_2}$ for $0.22\le x \le 0.70$. The spectra collected in the $B_{1g}$ symmetry channel reveal the existence of two collective modes which are indicative of the presence of two competing, yet subdominant, pairing tendencies of $d_{x^2-y^2}$ symmetry. A functional Renormalization Group (fRG) and random-phase approximation (RPA) study on this material confirms the presence of the two pairing tendencies within a spin-fluctuation scenario. The experimental doping dependence of these modes is also consistently matched by both fRG and RPA studies. Thus our findings strongly support a spin-fluctuation mediated pairing scenario.
  • Avenues of Majorana bound states (MBSs) have become one of the primary directions towards a possible realization of topological quantum computation. For a Y-junction of Kitaev quantum wires, we numerically investigate the braiding of MBSs while considering the full quasi-particle background. The two central sources of braiding errors are found to be the fidelity loss due to the incomplete adiabaticity of the braiding operation as well as the hybridization of the MBS. The explicit extraction of the braiding phase in the low-energy Majorana sector from the full many-particle Hilbert space allows us to analyze the breakdown of the independent-particle picture of Majorana braiding. Furthermore, we find nearest-neighbor interactions to significantly affect the braiding performance to the better or worse, depending on the sign and magnitude of the coupling.
  • Molecular wires of the acene-family can be viewed as a physical realization of a two-rung ladder Hamiltonian. For acene-ladders, closed-shell ab-initio calculations and elementary zone-folding arguments predict incommensurate gap oscillations as a function of the number of repetitive ring units, $N_{\text{R}}$, exhibiting a period of about ten rings. %% Results employing open-shell calculations and a mean-field treatment of interactions suggest anti-ferromagnetic correlations that could potentially open a large gap and wash out the gap oscillations. % Within the framework of a Hubbard model with repulsive on-site interaction, $U$, we employ a Hartree-Fock analysis and the density matrix renormalization group to investigate the interplay of gap oscillations and interactions. % We confirm the persistence of incommensurate oscillations in acene-type ladder systems for a significant fraction of parameter space spanned by $U$ and $N_{\text{R}}$.
  • One-dimensional (1D) electron systems in the presence of Coulomb interaction are described by Luttinger liquid theory. The strength of Coulomb interaction in the Luttinger liquid, as parameterized by the Luttinger parameter K, is in general difficult to measure. This is because K is usually hidden in powerlaw dependencies of observables as a function of temperature or applied bias. We propose a dynamical way to measure K on the basis of an electronic time-of-flight experiment. We argue that the helical Luttinger liquid at the edge of a 2D topological insulator constitutes a preeminently suited realization of a 1D system to test our proposal. This is based on the robustness of helical liquids against elastic backscattering in the presence of time reversal symmetry.
  • Topological crystalline insulators are materials in which the crystalline symmetry leads to topologically protected surface states with a chiral spin texture, rendering them potential candidates for spintronics applications. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we uncover the existence of one-dimensional (1D) midgap states at odd-atomic surface step edges of the three- dimensional topological crystalline insulator (Pb,Sn)Se. A minimal toy model and realistic tight- binding calculations identify them as spin-polarized flat bands connecting two Dirac points. This non-trivial origin provides the 1D midgap states with inherent stability and protects them from backscattering. We experimentally show that this stability results in a striking robustness to defects, strong magnetic fields, and elevated temperature.
  • We investigate the interplay of many-body and band structure effects of interacting Weyl semimetals (WSM). Attractive and repulsive Hubbard interactions are studied within a model for a time-reversal-breaking WSM with tetragonal symmetry, where we can approach the limit of weakly coupled planes and coupled chains by varying the hopping amplitudes. Using a slab geometry, we employ the variational cluster approach to describe the evolution of WSM Fermi arc surface states as a function of interaction strength. We find spin and charge density wave instabilities which can gap out Weyl nodes. We identify scenarios where the bulk Weyl nodes are gapped while the Fermi arcs still persist, hence realizing a quantum anomalous Hall state.
  • We investigate the quantum phases of the frustrated spin-$\frac{1}{2}$ $J_1$-$J_2$-$J_3$ Heisenberg model on the square lattice with ferromagnetic $J_1$ and antiferromagnetic $J_2$ and $J_3$ interactions. Using the pseudo-fermion functional renormalization group technique, we find an intermediate paramagnetic phase located between classically ordered ferromagnetic, stripy antiferromagnetic, and incommensurate spiral phases. We observe that quantum fluctuations lead to significant shifts of the spiral pitch angles compared to the classical limit. By computing the response of the system with respect to various spin rotation and lattice symmetry-breaking perturbations, we identify a complex interplay between different nematic spin states in the paramagnetic phase. While retaining time-reversal invariance, these phases either break spin-rotation symmetry, lattice-rotation symmetry, or a combination of both. We therefore propose the $J_1$-$J_2$-$J_3$ Heisenberg model on the square lattice as a paradigmatic example where different intimately connected types of nematic orders emerge in the same model.
  • Many fractional quantum Hall wave functions are known to be unique and highest-density zero modes of certain "pseudopotential" Hamiltonians. Examples include the Read-Rezayi series (in particular, the Laughlin, Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi Z_3 states), and more exotic non-unitary (Haldane-Rezayi, Gaffnian states) or irrational states (Haffnian state). While a systematic method to construct such Hamiltonians is available for the infinite plane or sphere geometry, its generalization to manifolds such as the cylinder or torus, where relative angular momentum is not an exact quantum number, has remained an open problem. Here we develop a geometric approach for constructing pseudopotential Hamiltonians in a universal manner that naturally applies to all geometries. Our method generalizes to the multicomponent SU(n) cases with a combination of spin or pseudospin (layer, subband, valley) degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the utility of the approach through several examples, including certain non-Abelian multicomponent states whose parent Hamiltonians were previously unknown, and verify the method by numerically computing their entanglement properties.