• We analyze the star formation history (SFH) of galaxies as a function of present-day environment, galaxy stellar mass and morphology. The SFH is derived by means of a non-parametric spectrophotometric model applied to individual galaxies at z ~ 0.04- 0.1 in the WINGS clusters and the PM2GC field. The field reconstructed evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) follows the values observed at each redshift (Madau & Dickinson 2014), except at z > 2 where our estimate is ~ 1.7x higher than the high-z observed value. The slope of the SFRD decline with time gets progressively steeper going from low mass to high mass haloes. The decrease of the SFRD since z = 2 is due to 1) quenching - 50% of the SFRD in the field and 75% in clusters at z > 2 originated in galaxies that are passive today - and 2) the fact that the average SFR of today's star-forming galaxies has decreased with time. We quantify the contribution to the SFRD(z) of galaxies of today's different masses and morphologies. The current morphology correlates with the current star formation activity but is irrelevant for the past stellar history. The average SFH depends on galaxy mass, but galaxies of a given mass have different histories depending on their environment. We conclude that the variation of the SFRD(z) with environment is not driven by different distributions of galaxy masses and morphologies in clusters and field, and must be due to an accelerated formation in high mass haloes compared to low mass ones even for galaxies that will end up having the same galaxy mass today.
  • Exploiting a mass complete (M_*>10^(10.25)M_sun) sample at 0.03<z<0.11 drawn from the Padova Millennium Galaxy Group Catalog (PM2GC), we use the (U-B)_rf color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star formation activity and/or morphology - green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment, and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of SFR in both bulges and disks which does not noticeably affect galaxy structure. Morphological transitions are linked to an enhanced bulge-to-disk ratio due to the removal of the disk, not to an increase of the bulge. Our modeling suggests that green colors might be due to star formation histories declining with long timescales, as an alternative scenario to the classical "quenching" processes. Our results suggest that galaxy transformations in star formation activity and morphology depend neither on environment nor on being a satellite or the most massive galaxy of a halo. The only environmental dependence we find is the higher fast quenching efficiency in groups giving origin to post-starburst signatures.
  • We study the galaxy stellar mass function in different environments in the local Universe, considering both the total mass function and that of individual galaxy morphological types. We compare the mass functions of galaxies with $\rm log_{10} M_{\star}/M_{\odot} \geq 10.25$ in the general field and in galaxy groups, binary and single galaxy systems from the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue at $z=0.04-0.1$ with the mass function of galaxy clusters of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-Cluster Survey at $z=0.04-0.07$. Strikingly, the variations of the mass function with global environment, overall, are small and subtle. The shapes of the mass functions of the general field and clusters are indistinguishable, and only small, statistically insignificant variations are allowed in groups. Only the mass function of our single galaxies, representing the least massive haloes and comprising less than a third of the general field population, is proportionally richer in low-mass galaxies than other environments. The most notable environmental effect is a progressive change in the upper galaxy mass, with very massive galaxies found only in the most massive environments. This environment-dependent mass cut-off is unable to affect the Schechter parameters and the K-S test, and can only be revealed by an ad-hoc analysis. Finally, we show how, in each given environment, the mass function changes with morphological type, and that galaxies of the same morphological type can have different mass functions in different environments.
  • We present a study of galaxy sizes in the local Universe as a function of galaxy environment, comparing clusters and the general field. Galaxies with radii and masses comparable to high-z massive and compact galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies more massive than 3 X 10^{10} M_sun in the field. Such galaxies are 3 times more frequent in clusters than in the field. Most of them are early-type galaxies with intermediate to old stellar populations. There is a trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. We show the relation between size and luminosity-weighted age for galaxies of different stellar masses and in different environments. We compare with high-z data to quantify the evolution of galaxy sizes. We find that, once the progenitor bias due to the relation between galaxy size and stellar age is removed, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, of the order of a factor 1.6.
  • We search for massive and compact galaxies (superdense galaxies, hereafter SDGs) at z=0.03-0.11 in the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue, a spectroscopically complete sample representative of the local Universe general field population. We find that compact galaxies with radii and mass densities comparable to high-z massive and passive galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies with stellar masses above 3 X 10^10 M_sun, yielding a number density of 4.3 X 10^-4 h^3 Mpc^-3. Most of them are S0s (70%) or ellipticals (23%), are red and have intermediate-to-old stellar populations, with a median luminosity-weighted age of 5.4 Gyr and a median mass-weighted age of 9.2 Gyr. Their velocity dispersions and dynamical masses are consistent with the small radii and high stellar mass estimates. Comparing with the WINGS sample of cluster galaxies at similar redshifts, the fraction of superdense galaxies is three times smaller in the field than in clusters, and cluster SDGs are on average 4 Gyr older than field SDGs. We confirm the existence of a universal trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. On top of the well known dependence of stellar age on galaxy mass, the luminosity-weighted age of galaxies depends on galaxy compactness at fixed mass, and, for a fixed mass and radius, on environment. This effect needs to be taken into account in order not to overestimate the evolution of galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. Our results and hierarchical simulations suggest that a significant fraction of the massive compact galaxies at high-z have evolved into compact galaxies in galaxy clusters today. When stellar age and environmental effects are taken into account, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, a factor ~1.6. (abridged)
  • We use \sim 2000 galaxies belonging to different environments to show how the fractions of different galaxy morphological types vary with global environment and as function of galaxy stellar mass at low redshift. Considering mass limited galaxy samples with log10 M\star/M\bigodot>= 10.25, we find a smooth increase/decline in the fraction of Es-S0s/late type galaxies going from single galaxies, to binaries, to groups. Considering all environments, the fractional variation is more conspicuous for S0s and late-types than for ellipticals solely due to a sharp enhancement/dearth of S0s/late-types in clusters compared to other environments. The morphological distribution of galaxies in the mass range 10.25 < log10 M\star/M\bigodot < 11 is rather independent both of galaxy stellar mass and global environment, except in clusters. The morphologies of galaxies more massive than log10 M\star/M\bigodot = 11 are instead a function of both galaxy mass and global environment. The morphology-mass relation therefore changes with global environment, showing that galaxy stellar mass cannot be the only parameter driving the morphological distribution of galaxies. The morphology-mass relations for S0 and late-type galaxies in clusters are peculiar compared to other environments, and this strongly suggests that cluster-specific effects act on these two types of galaxies, and that a significant number of S0s in clusters has a different origin with respect to S0s in other environments.
  • We present the construction and describe the properties of the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue (PM2GC), a galaxy catalogue representative of the general field population in the local Universe. We characterize galaxy environments by identifying galaxy groups at 0.04<=z<=0.1 with a Friends-of-Friends (FoF) algorithm using a complete sample of 3210 galaxies brighter than MB = -18.7 taken from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue (MGC, Liske et al. (2003)), a 38deg^2 photometric and spectroscopic equatorial survey. We identified 176 groups with at least three members, comprising in total 1057 galaxies and representing ~43 per cent of the general field population in that redshift range. The median redshift and velocity dispersion of our groups are 0.0823 and 192 km s^-1, respectively. 88 per cent of the groups have fewer than ten members, and 63 per cent have fewer than five members. Nongroup galaxies were subdivided into "inary" systems of two bright close companions, and "single" galaxies with no companion, in order to identify different environments useful for future scientific analysis. We performed a detailed comparison with the 2PIGG catalogue to validate the effectiveness of our method and the robustness of our results. Galaxy stellar masses are computed for all PM2GC galaxies, and found to be in good agreement with Sloan Digital Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) mass estimates. The catalogues of PM2GC groups, group properties and galaxy properties in all environments are publicly available on theWorld Wide Web.