• We present ALMA band 3 observations of the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [CI] 369micron emission lines in three of the highest redshift quasar host galaxies at 6.6<z<6.9. These measurements constitute the highest-redshift CO detections to date. The target quasars have previously been detected in [CII] 158micron emission and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum. We detect (spatially unresolved, at a resolution of >2", or >14kpc) CO emission in all three quasar hosts. In two sources, we detect the continuum emission around 400micron (rest-frame), and in one source we detect [CI] at low significance. We derive molecular gas reservoirs of (1-3)x10^10 M_sun in the quasar hosts, i.e. approximately only 10 times the mass of their central supermassive black holes. The extrapolated [CII]-to-CO(1-0) luminosity ratio is 2500-4200, consistent with measurements in galaxies at lower redshift. The detection of the [CI] line in one quasar host galaxy and the limit on the [CI] emission in the other two hosts enables a first characterization of the physical properties of the interstellar medium in z~7 quasar hosts. In the sources, the derived global CO/[CII]/[CI] line ratios are consistent with expectations from photodissociation regions (PDR), but not X-ray dominated regions (XDR). This suggest that quantities derived from the molecular gas and dust emission are related to ongoing star-formation activity in the quasar hosts, providing further evidence that the quasar hosts studied here harbor intense starbursts in addition to their active nucleus.
  • The structures and dynamics of molecular, atomic, and ionized gases are studied around a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a small ($2\times 10^6 M_\odot$) black hole using 3D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. We studied, for the first time, the non-equilibrium chemistry for the X-ray dominated region in the "radiation-driven fountain" (Wada 2012) with supernova feedback. A double hollow cone structure is naturally formed without postulating a thick "torus" around a central source. The cone is occupied with an inhomogeneous, diffuse ionized gas and surrounded by a geometrically thick ($h/r \gtrsim 1$) atomic gas. Dense molecular gases are distributed near the equatorial plane, and energy feedback from supernovae enhances their scale height. Molecular hydrogen exists in a hot phase ( > 1000 K) as well as in a cold ( < 100 K), dense ( >$10^3$ cm$^{-3}$) phase. The velocity dispersion of H$_2$ in the vertical direction is comparable to the rotational velocity, which is consistent with near infrared observations of nearby Seyfert galaxies. Using 3D radiation transfer calculations for the dust emission, we find polar emission in the mid-infrared band (12$\mu m$), which is associated with bipolar outflows, as suggested in recent interferometric observations of nearby AGNs. If the viewing angle for the nucleus is larger than 75 deg, the spectral energy distribution (~ 2 -- 60 $\mu m$) of this model is consistent with that of the Circinus galaxy. The multi-phase interstellar medium observed in optical/infrared and X-ray observations is also discussed.
  • In the last decade, the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) has been intricately linked to galaxy formation and evolution and is a key ingredient in the assembly of galaxies. To investigate the origin of SMBHs, we perform cosmological simulations that target the direct collapse black hole (DCBH) seed formation scenario in the presence of two different strong Lyman-Werner (LW) background fields. These simulations include the X-ray irradiation from a central massive black hole (MBH), $\rm{H}_2$ self-shielding and stellar feedback from metal-free and metal-enriched stars. We find in both simulations that local X-ray feedback induces metal-free star formation $\sim 0.5$ Myr after the MBH forms. The MBH accretion rate reaches a maximum of $10^{-3}$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in both simulations. However, the duty cycle differs which is derived to be $6\%$ and $50\%$ for high and low LW cases, respectively. The MBH in the high LW case grows only $\sim 6\%$ in 100 Myr compared to $16\%$ in the low LW case. We find that the maximum accretion rate is determined by the local gas thermodynamics whereas the duty cycle is determined by the large scale gas dynamics and gas reservoir. We conclude that radiative feedback from the central MBH plays an important role in star formation in the nuclear regions and stifling initial MBH growth, relative to the typical Eddington rate argument, and that initial MBH growth might be affected by the local LW radiation field.
  • At the distance of 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disk, probably in transition between a massive primordial disk and a debris disk. We observed the fine-structure lines of OI at 63 and 145 micron and the CII line at 157 micron with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large programme GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with archival Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, a ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 micron, and 12CO fundamental ro-vibrational and pure rotational J=3-2 observations. We simultaneously modeled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk gas- and dust properties assuming no dust settling. The models suggest that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disk around HD141569A, whereas the [CII] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted mostly by the outer disk. Simultaneous modeling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disk structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains with a radius smaller than 1 mm of 2.1E-7 MSun and from grains with a radius of up to 1 cm of 4.9E-6 MSun. We constrained the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mass to be between 2E-11 and 1..4E-10 MSun assuming circumcircumcoronene (C150H30) as the representative PAH. The associated PAH abundance relative to hydrogen is lower than those found in the interstellar medium (3E-7) by two to three orders of magnitude. The disk around HD141569A is less massive in gas (2.5 to 4.9E-4 MSun or 67 to 164 MEarth) and has a flat opening angle (<10%). [abridged]
  • We present an extension of the code ProDiMo that allows for a modeling of processes pertinent to active galactic nuclei and to an ambient chemistry that is time dependent. We present a proof-of-concept and focus on a few astrophysically relevant species, e.g., H+, H2+ and H3+; C+ and N+; C and O; CO and H2O; OH+, H2O+ and H3O+; HCN and HCO+. We find that the freeze-out of water is strongly suppressed and that this affects the bulk of the oxygen and carbon chemistry occurring in AGN. The commonly used AGN tracer HCN/HCO+ is strongly time-dependent, with ratios that vary over orders of magnitude for times longer than 10^4 years. Through ALMA observations this ratio can be used to probe how the narrow-line region evolves under large fluctuations in the SMBH accretion rate. Strong evolutionary trends, on time scales of 10^4-10^8 years, are also found in species such as H3O+, CO, and H2O. These reflect, respectively, time dependent effects in the ionization balance, the transient nature of the production of molecular gas, and the freeze-out/sublimation of water.
  • Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. The radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray wavelengths) and viscous accretion are the main source of energy and dominates the disk physics and chemistry in its early stages. This is the environment in which the first phases of planet formation will proceed. We investigate how stellar and disk parameters impact the fine-structure cooling lines [NeII], [ArII], [OI], [CII] and H2O rotational lines in the disk. These lines are potentially powerful diagnostics of the disk structure and their modelling permits a thorough interpretation of the observations carried out with instrumental facilities such as Spitzer and Herschel. Following Aresu et al. (2011), we computed a grid of 240 disk models, in which the X-ray luminosity, UV-excess luminosity, minimum dust grain size, dust size distribution power law and surface density distribution power law, are systematically varied. We solve self-consistently for the disk vertical hydrostatic structure in every model and apply detailed line radiative transfer to calculate line fluxes and profiles for a series of well known mid- and far-infrared cooling lines. The [OI] 63 micron line flux increases with increasing FUV luminosity when Lx < 1e30 erg/s, and with increasing X-ray luminosity when LX > 1e30 erg/s. [CII] 157 micron is mainly driven by FUV luminosity via C+ production, X-rays affect the line flux to a lesser extent. [NeII] 12.8 micron correlates with X-rays; the line profile emitted from the disk atmosphere shows a double-peaked component, caused by emission in the static disk atmosphere, next to a high velocity double-peaked component, caused by emission in the very inner rim. (abridged)
  • We present the detection of four rotational emission lines of water vapor, from energy levels Eu/k= 101 - 454 K, in the gravitationally lensed z=3.9 QSO host galaxy APM08279+5255. While the lowest H2O lines are collisionally excited in clumps of warm, dense gas (density of hydrogen nuclei n_H=(3.1 +/- 1.2) x 10^6 cm^-3, gas temperature T_g ~ 105 +/- 21 K), we find that the excitation of the higher lines is dominated by the intense local infrared radiation field. Since only collisionally excited emission contributes to gas cooling, we conclude that H2O is not a significant coolant of the warm molecular gas. Our excitation model requires the radiatively excited gas to be located in an extended region of high 100 micron opacity (tau_100 = 0.9 +/- 0.2). Locally, such extended infrared-opaque regions are found only in the nuclei of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We propose a model where the infrared-opaque circumnuclear cloud, which is penetrated by the X-ray radiation field of the QSO nucleus, contains clumps of massive star formation where the H2O emission originates. The radiation pressure from the intense local infrared radiation field exceeds the thermal gas pressure by about an order of magnitude, suggesting close to Eddington-limited star formation in these clumps.
  • The consequences of the Auger effect on the population of heavy element ions are analyzed for the case of relatively cool gas irradiated by keV X-rays, with intended applications to the accretion disks of young stellar ob jects. Highly charged ions are rapidly reduced to the doubly-charged state in neutral gas, so the aim here is to derive the production rates for these singly- and doubly-charged ions and to specify their transformation by recombination, charge transfer, and molecular reactions. The theory is illustrated by calculations of the abundances of eleven of the most cosmically abundant heavy elements in a model of a typical T Tauri star disk. The physical properties of the gas are determined with an X-ray irradiated thermal-chemical model, which shows that the disk atmosphere consists of a hot atmosphere overlaying the mainly cool body of the disk. There is a warm transition layer where hydrogen, carbon and oxygen are transformed from atomic to molecular species and the ionization drops by several orders of magnitude. The doubly charged ions are then largely confined to the hot outer layers of the disk. The nature of the dominant ions below the transition depends sensitively on the poorly constrained abundances of the heavy elements. Observational consequences and connections with the active layers of the magneto-rotational instability are briefly discussed.
  • We present a Spitzer InfraRed Spectrometer search for 10-36 micron molecular emission from a large sample of protoplanetary disks, including lines from H2O, OH, C2H2, HCN and CO2. This paper describes the sample and data processing and derives the detection rate of mid-infrared molecular emission as a function of stellar mass. The sample covers a range of spectral type from early M to A, and is supplemented by archival spectra of disks around A and B stars. It is drawn from a variety of nearby star forming regions, including Ophiuchus, Lupus and Chamaeleon. In total, we identify 22 T Tauri stars with strong mid-infrared H2O emission. Integrated water line luminosities, where water vapor is detected, range from 5x10^-4 to 9x10^-3 Lsun, likely making water the dominant line coolant of inner disk surfaces in classical T Tauri stars. None of the 5 transitional disks in the sample show detectable gaseous molecular emission with Spitzer upper limits at the 1% level in terms of line-to-continuum ratios (apart from H2). We find a strong dependence on detection rate with spectral type; no disks around our sample of 25 A and B stars were found to exhibit water emission, down to 1-2% line-to-continuum ratios, in the mid-infrared, while almost 2/3 of the disks around K stars show sufficiently intense water emission to be detected by Spitzer. Some Herbig Ae/Be stars show tentative H2O/OH emission features beyond 20 micron at the 1-2 level, however, and one of them shows CO2 in emission. We argue that the observed differences between T Tauri disks and Herbig Ae/Be disks is due to a difference in excitation and/or chemistry depending on spectral type and suggest that photochemistry may be playing an important role in the observable characteristics of mid-infrared molecular line emission from protoplanetary disks.
  • The material that formed the present-day Solar System originated in feeding zones in the inner Solar Nebula located at distances within ~20 AU from the Sun, known as the planet-forming zone. Meteoritic and cometary material contain abundant evidence for the presence of a rich and active chemistry in the planet-forming zone during the gas-rich phase of Solar System formation. It is a natural conjecture that analogs can be found amoung the zoo of protoplanetary disks around nearby young stars. The study of the chemistry and dynamics of planet formation requires: 1) tracers of dense gas at 100-1000 K and 2) imaging capabilities of such tracers with 5-100 (0.5-20 AU) milli-arcsec resolution, corresponding to the planet-forming zone at the distance of the closest star-forming regions. Recognizing that the rich infrared (2-200 micron) molecular spectrum recently discovered to be common in protoplanetary disks represents such a tracer, we present a new general raytracing code, RADLite, that is optimized for producing infrared line spectra and images from axisymmetric structures. RADLite can consistently deal with a wide range of velocity gradients, such as those typical for the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. The code is intended as a backend for chemical and excitation codes, and can rapidly produce spectra of thousands of lines for grids of models for comparison with observations. Such radiative transfer tools will be crucial for constraining both the structure and chemistry of planet-forming regions, including data from current infrared imaging spectrometers and extending to the Atacama Large Millimeter Array and the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope and beyond.
  • While both society and astronomy have evolved greatly over the past fifty years, the academic institutions and incentives that shape our field have remained largely stagnant. As a result, the astronomical community is faced with several major challenges, including: (1) the training that we provide does not align with the skills that future astronomers will need, (2) the postdoctoral phase is becoming increasingly demanding and demoralizing, and (3) our jobs are increasingly unfriendly to families with children. Solving these problems will require conscious engineering of our profession. Fortunately, this Decadal Review offers the opportunity to revise outmoded practices to be more effective and equitable. The highest priority of the Subcommittee on the State of the Profession should be to recommend specific, funded activities that will ensure the field meets the challenges we describe.
  • We present high resolution (R=80,000) spectroscopy of [NeII] emission from two young stars, GM Aur and AA Tau, which have moderate to high inclinations. The emission from both sources appears centered near the stellar velocity and is broader than the [NeII] emission measured previously for the face-on disk system TW Hya. These properties are consistent with a disk origin for the [NeII] emission we detect, with disk rotation (rather than photoevaporation or turbulence in a hot disk atmosphere) playing the dominant role in the origin of the line width. In the non-face-on systems, the [NeII] emission is narrower than the CO fundamental emission from the same sources. If the widths of both diagnostics are dominated by Keplerian rotation, this suggests that the [NeII] emission arises from larger disk radii on average than does the CO emission. The equivalent width of the [NeII] emission we detect is less than that of the spectrally unresolved [NeII] feature in the Spitzer spectra of the same sources. Variability in the [NeII] emission or the mid-infrared continuum, a spatially extended [NeII] component, or a very (spectrally) broad [NeII] component might account for the difference in the equivalent widths.
  • We discuss some implications of our recent detection of extragalactic H3O+: the location of the gas in M82, the origin of energetic radiation in M82, and the possible feedback effects of star formation on the cosmic ray flux in galaxies.
  • The H3O+ molecule probes the oxygen chemistry and the ionization rate of dense circumnuclear gas in galaxies. In particular, recent H3O+ observations show variations in the cosmic-ray ionization rate by factors of $>$10 within our Galaxy. Using the JCMT, we have observed the 364 GHz line of p-H3O+ in the centers of M82 and Arp 220. In Arp 220, the line profile suggests that the emission originates in the Western nucleus. In M82, both the eastern molecular peak and the circumnuclear region contribute to the emission. The derived column densities, abundances, and H3O+ / H2O ratios indicate ionization rates similar to or even exceeding that in the Galactic Center. Model calculations of the chemistry of irradiated molecular gas indicate a likely origin of this high ionization rate in the extended, evolved starburst of M82. In contrast, irradiation by X-rays from the AGN disk is the most likely model for Arp 220.
  • We present a far-ultraviolet (PDR) and an X-ray dominated region (XDR) code. We include and discuss thermal and chemical processes that pertain to irradiated gas. An elaborate chemical network is used and a careful treatment of PAHs and H2 formation, destruction and excitation is included. For both codes we calculate four depth-dependent models for different densities and radiation fields, relevant to conditions in starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei. A detailed comparison between PDR and XDR physics is made for total gas column densities between ~10^20 and ~10^25 cm^-2. We show cumulative line intensities for a number of fine-structure lines (e.g., [CII], [OI], [CI], [SiII], [FeII]), as well as cumulative column densities and column density ratios for a number of species (e.g., CO/H2, CO/C, HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN). The comparison between the results for the PDRs and XDRs shows that column density ratios are almost constant up to N_H=10^22 cm^-2 for XDRs, unlike those in PDRs. For example, CO/C in PDRs changes over four orders of magnitude from the edge to N_H=10^22 cm^-2. The CO/C and CO/H2 ratios are lower in XDRs at low column densities and rise at N_H > 10^23 cm^-2. At most column densities N_H > 10^21.5 cm^-2, HNC/HCN ratios are lower in XDRs too, but they show a more moderate increase at higher N_H.