• We derive stellar population parameters for a representative sample of ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs) and a large sample of massive globular clusters (GCs) with stellar masses $\gtrsim$ 10$^{6}$ $M_{\odot}$ in the central galaxy M87 of the Virgo galaxy cluster, based on model fitting to the Lick-index measurements from both the literature and new observations. After necessary spectral stacking of the relatively faint objects in our initial sample of 40 UCDs and 118 GCs, we obtain 30 sets of Lick-index measurements for UCDs and 80 for GCs. The M87 UCDs have ages $\gtrsim$ 8 Gyr and [$\alpha$/Fe] $\simeq$ 0.4 dex, in agreement with previous studies based on smaller samples. The literature UCDs, located in lower-density environments than M87, extend to younger ages and smaller [$\alpha$/Fe] (at given metallicities) than M87 UCDs, resembling the environmental dependence of the Virgo dE nuclei. The UCDs exhibit a positive mass-metallicity relation (MZR), which flattens and connects compact ellipticals at stellar masses $\gtrsim$ 10$^{8}$ $M_{\odot}$. The Virgo dE nuclei largely follow the average MZR of UCDs, whereas most of the M87 GCs are offset towards higher metallicities for given stellar masses. The difference between the mass-metallicity distributions of UCDs and GCs may be qualitatively understood as a result of their different physical sizes at birth in a self-enrichment scenario or of galactic nuclear cluster star formation efficiency being relatively low in a tidal stripping scenario for UCD formation. The existing observations provide the necessary but not sufficient evidence for tidally stripped dE nuclei being the dominant contributors to the M87 UCDs.
  • Substructure in globular cluster (GC) populations around large galaxies is expected in galaxy formation scenarios that involve accretion or merger events, and it has been searched for using direct associations between GCs and structure in the diffuse galaxy light, or with GC kinematics. Here, we present a search for candidate substructures in the GC population around the Virgo cD galaxy M87 through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the GC colors.~The study is based on a sample of $\sim\!1800$ bright GCs with high-quality $u,g,r,i,z,K_s$ photometry, selected to ensure a low contamination by foreground stars or background galaxies.~The spectral energy distributions of the GCs are associated with formal estimates of age and metallicity, which are representative of its position in a 4-D color-space relative to standard single stellar population models.~Dividing the sample into broad bins based on the relative formal ages, we observe inhomogeneities which reveal signatures of GC substructures.~The most significant of these is a spatial overdensity of GCs with relatively young age labels, of diameter $\sim\!0.1$\,deg ($\sim\!30\,$kpc), located to the south of M87.~The significance of this detection is larger than about 5$\sigma$ after accounting for estimates of random and systematic errors.~Surprisingly, no large Virgo galaxy is present in this area, that could potentially host these GCs.~But candidate substructures in the M87 halo with equally elusive hosts have been described based on kinematic studies in the past.~The number of GC spectra available around M87 is currently insufficient to clarify the nature of the new candidate substructure.
  • We present a photometric study of the dwarf galaxy population in the core region ($< r_{\rm vir}/4$) of the Fornax galaxy cluster based on deep $u'g'i'$ photometry from the Next Generation Fornax Cluster Survey. All imaging data were obtained with the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Interamerican Observatory. We identify 258 dwarf galaxy candidates with luminosities $-17 < M_{g'} < -8$ mag, corresponding to typical stellar masses of $9.5\gtrsim \log{\cal M}_{\star}/M_\odot \gtrsim 5.5$, reaching $\sim\!3$ mag deeper in point-source luminosity and $\sim\!4$ mag deeper in surface-brightness sensitivity compared to the classic Fornax Cluster Catalog. Morphological analysis shows that surface-brightness profiles are well represented by single-component S\'ersic models with average S\'ersic indices of $\langle n\rangle_{u',g',i'}=(0.78-0.83) \pm 0.02$, and average effective radii of $\langle r_e\rangle_{u',g',i'}\!=(0.67-0.70) \pm 0.02$ kpc. Color-magnitude relations indicate a flattening of the galaxy red sequence at faint galaxy luminosities, similar to the one recently discovered in the Virgo cluster. A comparison with population synthesis models and the galaxy mass-metallicity relation reveals that the average faint dwarf galaxy is likely older than ~5 Gyr. We study galaxy scaling relations between stellar mass, effective radius, and stellar mass surface density over a stellar mass range covering six orders of magnitude. We find that over the sampled stellar mass range several distinct mechanisms of galaxy mass assembly can be identified: i) dwarf galaxies assemble mass inside the half-mass radius up to $\log{\cal M}_{\star}$ ~8.0, ii) isometric mass assembly in the range $8.0 < \log{\cal M}_{\star}/M_\odot < 10.5$, and iii) massive galaxies assemble stellar mass predominantly in their halos at $\log{\cal M}_{\star}$ ~10.5 and above.
  • We present an analysis of 39 nuclei and their early-type hosts in the Virgo Cluster using ten broadband filters: F300W, F475W, F850LP, F160W, $u^*griz$, and $K_s$. We describe the Virgo Redux program, which provides high-resolution UV and NIR imaging. Combining this data with optical and NIR imaging from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey and the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, we estimate masses, metallicities and ages using simple stellar population (SSP) models. For 19 nuclei, we compare to SSP parameters derived from Keck and Gemini spectra and find reasonable agreement between the photometric and spectroscopic metallicity: the RMS scatter is 0.3 dex. We reproduce the nucleus-galaxy mass fraction of $0.33^{+0.09}_{-0.07}$ percent for galaxy stellar masses $10^{8.4}-10^{10.3} M_\odot$ with a typical precision of $\sim$35% for the nuclei masses. Based on available model predictions, there is no single preferred formation scenario for nuclei, suggesting that nuclei are formed stochastically through a mix of processes. Nuclei metallicities are statistically identical to those of their hosts, appearing $0.07 \pm 0.3$ dex more metal-rich on average -- although, omitting galaxies with unusual origins, nuclei are $0.20\pm0.28$ dex more metal-rich. Nuclei appear to be $0.56 \pm 0.12$ dex more metal rich than ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) at fixed mass. We find no clear age difference between nuclei and their galaxies, with nuclei displaying a broad range of ages. Interestingly, we find that the most massive nuclei may be flatter and more closely aligned with the semi-major axes of their hosts, suggesting that they formed through predominantly dissipative processes.
  • Large samples of globular clusters (GC) with precise multi-wavelength photometry are becoming increasingly available and can be used to constrain the formation history of galaxies. We present the results of an analysis of Milky Way (MW) and Virgo core GCs based on five optical-near-infrared colors and ten synthetic stellar population models. For the MW GCs, the models tend to agree on photometric ages and metallicities, with values similar to those obtained with previous studies. When used with Virgo core GCs, for which photometry is provided by the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), the same models generically return younger ages. This is a consequence of the systematic differences observed between the locus occupied by Virgo core GCs and models in panchromatic color space. Only extreme fine-tuning of the adjustable parameters available to us can make the majority of the best-fit ages old. Although we cannot exclude that the formation history of the Virgo core may lead to more conspicuous populations of relatively young GCs than in other environments, we emphasize that the intrinsic properties of the Virgo GCs are likely to differ systematically from those assumed in the models. Thus, the large wavelength coverage and photometric quality of modern GC samples, such as used here, is not by itself sufficient to better constrain the GC formation histories. Models matching the environment-dependent characteristics of GCs in multi-dimensional color space are needed to improve the situation.
  • We show that hard encounters in the central regions of globular clusters embedded in dark matter (DM) haloes necessarily lead to the formation of gravitationally-bound stellar envelopes that extend far beyond the nominal tidal radius of the system. Using statistical arguments and numerical techniques we derive the equilibrium distribution function of stars ejected from the centre of a non-divergent spherical potential. Independently of the velocity distribution with which stars are ejected, GC envelopes have density profiles that approach asymptotically $\rho\sim r^{-4}$ at large distances and become isothermal towards the centre. Adding a DM halo component leaves two clear-cut observational signatures: (i) a flattening, or slightly increase of the projected velocity dispersion profile at large distances, and (ii) an outer surface density profile that is systematically shallower than in models with no dark matter.
  • We present the Pristine survey, a new narrow-band photometric survey focused on the metallicity-sensitive Ca H & K lines and conducted in the northern hemisphere with the wide-field imager MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). This paper reviews our overall survey strategy and discusses the data processing and metallicity calibration. Additionally we review the application of these data to the main aims of the survey, which are to gather a large sample of the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy, to further characterise the faintest Milky Way satellites, and to map the (metal-poor) substructure in the Galactic halo. The current Pristine footprint comprises over 1,000 deg2 in the Galactic halo ranging from b~30 to 78 and covers many known stellar substructures. We demonstrate that, for SDSS stellar objects, we can calibrate the photometry at the 0.02-magnitude level. The comparison with existing spectroscopic metallicities from SDSS/SEGUE and LAMOST shows that, when combined with SDSS broad-band g and i photometry, we can use the CaHK photometry to infer photometric metallicities with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex from [Fe/H]=-0.5 down to the extremely metal-poor regime ([Fe/H]<-3.0). After the removal of various contaminants, we can efficiently select metal-poor stars and build a very complete sample with high purity. The success rate of uncovering [Fe/H]SEGUE<-3.0 stars among [Fe/H]Pristine<-3.0 selected stars is 24% and 85% of the remaining candidates are still very metal poor ([Fe/H]<-2.0). We further demonstrate that Pristine is well suited to identify the very rare and pristine Galactic stars with [Fe/H]<-4.0, which can teach us valuable lessons about the early Universe.
  • Using the latest cosmological hydrodynamic N-body simulations of groups and clusters, we study how location in phase-space coordinates at $z$$=$$0$ can provide information on environmental effects acting in clusters. We confirm the results of previous authors showing that galaxies tend to follow a typical path in phase-space as they settle into the cluster potential. As such, different regions of phase-space can be associated with different times since first infalling into the cluster. However, in addition, we see a clear trend between total mass loss due to cluster tides, and time since infall. Thus we find location in phase-space provides information on both infall time, and tidal mass loss. We find the predictive power of phase-space diagrams remains even when projected quantities are used (i.e. line-of-sight velocities, and projected distances from the cluster). We provide figures that can be directly compared with observed samples of cluster galaxies and we also provide the data used to make them as supplementary data, in order to encourage the use of phase-space diagrams as a tool to understand cluster environmental effects. We find that our results depend very weakly on galaxy mass or host mass, so the predictions in our phase-space diagrams can be applied to groups or clusters alike, or to galaxy populations from dwarfs up to giants.
  • Globular clusters (GCs) are some of the most visible tracers of the merging and accretion history of galaxy halos. Metal-poor GCs, in particular, are thought to arrive in massive galaxies largely through dry, minor merging events, but it is rare to see a direct connection between GCs and visible stellar streams. NGC 474 is a post-merger early-type galaxy with dramatic fine structures made of concentric shells and radial streams that have been more clearly revealed by deep imaging. We present a study of GCs in NGC 474 to better establish the relationship between merger-induced fine structure and the GC system. We find that many GCs are superimposed on visible streams and shells, and about 35% of GCs outside $3R_{\rm e,galaxy}$ are located in regions of fine structure. The spatial correlation between the GCs and fine structure is significant at the 99.9% level, showing that this correlation is not coincidental. The colors of the GCs on the fine structures are mostly blue, and we also find an intermediate-color population that is dominant in the central region, and which will likely passively evolve to have colors consistent with a traditional metal-rich GC population. The association of the blue GCs with fine structures is direct confirmation that many metal-poor GCs are accreted onto massive galaxy halos through merging events, and that progenitors of these mergers are sub-L* galaxies.
  • The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey is a deep (with a $2\sigma$ detection limit $\mu_g$ = 29~mag~arcsec$^{-2}$ in the $g-$band) optical panchromatic survey targeting the Virgo cluster from its core to virial radius, for a total areal coverage of 104 square degrees. As such, the survey is well suited for the study of galaxies' outskirts, haloes and low surface brightness features that arise from dynamical interactions within the cluster environment. We report the discovery of extremely faint ($\mu_g$ $>$ 25 mag arcsec$^{-2}$) shells in three Virgo cluster early-type dwarf galaxies, VCC~1361, VCC~1447 and VCC~1668. Among them, VCC~1447 has an absolute magnitude M$_{g}$ = -11.71 mag and is {\it the least massive galaxy with a shell system discovered to date}. We present a detailed study of these low surface brightness features. We detect between three and four shells in each of our galaxies. Within the uncertainties, we find no evidence of a color difference between the galaxy main body and shell features. The observed arcs of the shells are located upto several effective radii of the galaxies. We further explore the origin of these low surface brightness features with the help of idealized numerical simulations. We find that a near equal mass merger is best able to reproduce the main properties of the shells, including their quite symmetric appearance and their alignment along the major axis of the galaxy. The simulations provide support for a formation scenario in which a recent merger, between two near-equal mass, gas-free dwarf galaxies forms the observed shell systems.
  • We use deep optical photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey [NGVS] to investigate the color-magnitude diagram for the galaxies inhabiting the core of this cluster. The sensitivity of the NGVS imaging allows us to continuously probe galaxy colors over a factor of $\sim 2 \times 10^5$ in luminosity, from brightest cluster galaxies to scales overlapping classical satellites of the Milky Way [$M_{g^{\prime}}$ $\sim$ $-$9; $M_{*}$ $\sim 10^6$ M$_{\odot}$], within a single environment. Remarkably, we find the first evidence that the RS flattens in all colors at the faint-magnitude end [starting between $-$14 $\le$ $M_{g^{\prime}}$ $\le$ $-$13, around $M_{*}$ $\sim 4 \times 10^7$ M$_{\odot}$], with the slope decreasing to $\sim$60% or less of its value at brighter magnitudes. This could indicate that the stellar populations of faint dwarfs in Virgo's core share similar characteristics [e.g. constant mean age] over $\sim$3 mags in luminosity, suggesting that these galaxies were quenched coevally, likely via pre-processing in smaller hosts. We also compare our results to galaxy formation models, finding that the RS in model clusters have slopes at intermediate magnitudes that are too shallow, and in the case of semi-analytic models, do not reproduce the flattening seen at both extremes [bright/faint] of the Virgo RS. Deficiencies in the chemical evolution of model galaxies likely contribute to the model-data discrepancies at all masses, while overly efficient quenching may also be a factor at dwarf scales. Deep UV and near-IR photometry are required to unambiguously diagnose the cause of the faint-end flattening.
  • Using high resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, we conduct a comprehensive study of how tidal stripping removes dark matter and stars from galaxies. We find that dark matter is always stripped far more significantly than the stars -- galaxies that lose $\sim$80$\%$ of their dark matter, typically lose only 10$\%$ of their stars. This is because the dark matter halo is initially much more extended than the stars. As such, we find the stellar-to-halo size-ratio (measured using r$_{\rm{eff}}$/r$_{\rm{vir}}$) is a key parameter controlling the relative amounts of dark matter and stellar stripping. We use simple fitting formulae to measure the relation between the fraction of bound dark matter and fraction of bound stars. We measure a negligible dependence on cluster mass or galaxy mass. Therefore these formulae have general applicability in cosmological simulations, and are ideal to improve stellar stripping recipes in semi-analytical models, and/or to estimate the impact that tidal stripping would have on galaxies when only their halo mass evolution is known.
  • We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW) based on VLT/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color-color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color-color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color-color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, IMF variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.
  • We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\!\lesssim\! r_{\rm eff}/{\rm kpc}\! \lesssim\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\!\lesssim\! M_U\! \lesssim\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\!\lesssim\! M_I\! \lesssim\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\!-\!I)_0\!\simeq\!1.1\!-\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\mu_U\!\simeq\!28.1\,{\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\mu_I\!\simeq\!27.4\,{\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\odot} \simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\,Z_\odot}\!\simeq\!10^{6.3-8}\,M_{\odot}$. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than $\sim 2$ Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with $\sim\!2$ kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of $r_{\rm eff}\!\simeq\!46\!-\!63$ pc and magnitude M$_{U,0}=-7.42$ mag and $(U\!-\!I)_0\!=\!1.51$ mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range $10^{4.9-6.5}\,M_\odot$.
  • The central region of the Virgo cluster of galaxies contains thousands of globular clusters (GCs), an order of magnitude more than the numbers found in the Local Group. Relics of early star formation epochs in the universe, these GCs also provide ideal targets to test our understanding of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of old stellar populations. Based on photometric data from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) and its near-infrared counterpart NGVS-IR, we select a robust sample of 1846 GCs with excellent photometry and spanning the full range of colors present in the Virgo core. The selection exploits the well defined locus of GCs in the uiK diagram and the fact that the globular clusters are marginally resolved in the images. We show that the GCs define a narrow sequence in 5-dimensional color space, with limited but real dispersion around the mean sequence. The comparison of these SEDs with the predictions of eleven widely used population synthesis models highlights differences between models, and also shows that no single model adequately matches the data in all colors. We discuss possible causes for some of these discrepancies. Forthcoming papers of this series will examine how best to estimate photometric metallicities in this context, and compare the Virgo globular cluster colors with those in other environments.
  • We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg$^2$ (0.3 Mpc$^2$) area in the core of the Virgo cluster, based on $ugriz$ data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample consists of 352 objects brighter than $M_g=-9.13$ mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint end slope of $\alpha=-1.33 \pm 0.02$ for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function as well as the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultra compact dwarfs galaxies (UCDs) -- previously compiled by the NGVS in this region -- to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, $M_g = -9.6$ mag) increases dramatically, up to $\alpha = -1.60 \pm 0.06$ when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo due to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ~150 objects with $M_g\lesssim-9.6$ mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters, might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the core of Virgo might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ~40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group satellites, $\alpha=-1.21\pm0.05$.
  • Galaxy clusters contain a large population of low mass dwarf elliptical galaxies whose exact origin is unclear: their colors, structural properties and kinematics differ substantially from those of dwarf irregulars in the field. We use the Illustris cosmological simulation to study differences in the assembly paths of dwarf galaxies (3e8 < M_*/M_sun < 1e10) according to their environment. We find that cluster dwarfs achieve their maximum total and stellar mass on average ~ 8 and ~ 4.5 Gyr ago (or redshifts z = 1.0 and z = 0.4, respectively), around the time of infall into the clusters. In contrast, field dwarfs not subjected to environmental stripping, reach their maximum mass at redshift z = 0. This different assembly history naturally produces a color bimodality, with blue isolated dwarfs and redder cluster dwarfs exhibiting negligible star-formation today. The cessation of star formation happens over median times 3.5-5 Gyr depending on stellar mass, and shows a large scatter (~ 1-8 Gyr), with the lower values associated with starburst events that occur at infall through the virial radius or pericentric passages. We argue that such starbursts together with the early assembly of cluster dwarfs can provide a natural explanation for the higher specific frequency of globular clusters (GCs) in cluster dwarfs, as found observationally. We present a simple model for the formation and stripping of GCs that supports this interpretation. The origin of dwarf ellipticals in clusters is, therefore, consistent with an environmentally-driven evolution of field dwarf irregulars. However the z = 0 field analogs of cluster dwarf progenitors have today stellar masses a factor ~ 3 larger --a difference arising from the early truncation of star formation in cluster dwarfs.
  • We conduct a comprehensive numerical study of the orbital dependence of harassment on early-type dwarfs consisting of 168 different orbits within a realistic, Virgo-like cluster, varying in eccentricity and pericentre distance. We find harassment is only effective at stripping stars or truncating their stellar disks for orbits that enter deep into the cluster core. Comparing to the orbital distribution in cosmological simulations, we find that the majority of the orbits (more than three quarters) result in no stellar mass loss. We also study the effects on the radial profiles of the globular cluster systems of early-type dwarfs. We find these are significantly altered only if harassment is very strong. This suggests that perhaps most early-type dwarfs in clusters such as Virgo have not suffered any tidal stripping of stars or globular clusters due to harassment, as these components are safely embedded deep within their dark matter halo. We demonstrate that this result is actually consistent with an earlier study of harassment of dwarf galaxies, despite the apparent contradiction. Those few dwarf models that do suffer stellar stripping are found out to the virial radius of the cluster at redshift=0, which mixes them in with less strongly harassed galaxies. However when placed on phase-space diagrams, strongly harassed galaxies are found offset to lower velocities compared to weakly harassed galaxies. This remains true in a cosmological simulation, even when halos have a wide range of masses and concentrations. Thus phase-space diagrams may be a useful tool for determining the relative likelihood that galaxies have been strongly or weakly harassed.
  • We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive, red-sequence galaxies M87, M49 and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color-color diagrams ($u^*iK_s$ or $u^*gz$). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ~3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters, and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ~85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.
  • The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs)--objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies--has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme GCs, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs (rh >~10 pc) and 911 GCs associated with central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M_star > ~2X10^6 M_sun and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the sample of previous confirmed Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying the global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of the blue GCs in the inner ~ 70 kpc and as steep as that of the red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than the GCs, and the blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have a radially increasing orbital anisotropy profile, and are tangentially-biased at radii < ~ 40 kpc and radially-biased further out. In contrast, the blue GCs become more tangentially-biased at larger radii beyond ~ 40 kpc; (4) GCs with M_star > 2X10^6 M_sun have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially-biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the "tidally threshed dwarf galaxy" scenario.
  • (Abridged) Atmospheric dispersion and field differential refraction impose severe constraints on widefield MOS observations. Flux reduction and spectral distortions must be minimised by a careful planning of the observations -- which is especially true for instruments that use slits instead of fibres. This is the case of VIMOS at the VLT, where MOS observations have been restricted, since the start of operations, to a narrow two-hour range from the meridian to minimise slit losses. We revisit in detail the impact of atmospheric effects on the quality of VIMOS-MOS spectra. We model slit losses across the entire VIMOS FOV as a function of target declination. We explore two different slit orientations at the meridian: along the parallactic angle (North-South), and perpendicular to it (East-West). We show that, for fields culminating at zenith distances larger than 20 deg, slit losses are minimised with slits oriented along the parallactic angle at the meridian. The two-hour angle rule holds for these observations using N-S orientations. Conversely, for fields with zenith angles smaller than 20 deg at culmination, losses are minimised with slits oriented perpendicular to the parallactic angle at the meridian. MOS observations can be effectively extended to plus/minus three hours from the meridian in these cases. In general, night-long observations of a single field will benefit from using the E-W orientation. All-sky or service mode observations, however, require a more elaborate planning that depends on the target declination, and the hour angle of the observations. We establish general rules for the alignment of slits in MOS observations that will increase target observability, enhance the efficiency of operations, and speed up the completion of programmes -- a particularly relevant aspect for the forthcoming spectroscopic public surveys with VIMOS.
  • We address the effects of bar-driven secular evolution in discs by comparing their properties in a sample of nearly 700 unbarred and barred (42 +- 3 per cent of the population) massive disc galaxies (M* > 10^10 Msun). We make use of accurate structural parameters derived from i-band bulge/disc/bar decompositions to show that, as a population, barred discs tend to have fainter central surface brightness (Delta mu_0 ~ 0.25 mag), and disc scale lengths that are ~15 per cent larger than those of unbarred galaxies of the same stellar mass. The corresponding distributions of mu_0 and h are statistically inconsistent at the 5.2 sigma and 3.8 sigma levels, respectively. Bars rarely occur in high-surface brightness discs, with less than 5 per cent of the barred population having mu_0 < 19.5 mag arcsec^-2 -- compared to 20 per cent for unbarred galaxies. They tend to reside in moderately blue discs, with a bar fraction that peaks at (g-i)_disc ~ 0.95 mag and mildly declines for both bluer and redder colours. These results demonstrate noticeable structural differences between the discs of barred and unbarred galaxies, which we argue are the result of bar-driven evolution -- in qualitative agreement with longstanding theoretical expectations.
  • The dynamics of globular cluster systems (GCSs) around galaxies are often used to assess the total enclosed mass, and even to constrain the dark matter distribution. The globular cluster system of a galaxy is typically assumed to be in dynamical equilibrium within the potential of the host galaxy. However cluster galaxies are subjected to a rapidly evolving and, at times, violently destructive tidal field. We investigate the impact of the harassment on the dynamics of GCs surrounding early type cluster dwarfs, using numerical simulations. We find that the dynamical behaviour of the GCS is strongly influenced by the fraction of bound dark matter f_{DM} remaining in the galaxy. Only when f_{DM} falls to ~15%, do stars and GCs begin to be stripped. Still the observed GC velocity dispersion can be used to measure the true enclosed mass to within a factor of 2, even when f_{DM} falls as low as ~3%. This is possible partly because unbound GCs quickly separate from the galaxy body. However even the distribution of {\it{bound}} GCs may spatially expand by a factor of 2-3. Once f_{DM} falls into the <3% regime, the galaxy is close to complete disruption, and GCS dynamics can no longer be used to reliably estimate the enclosed mass. In this regime, the remaining bound GCS may spatially expand by a factor of 4 to 8. It may be possible to test if a galaxy is in this regime by measuring the dynamics of the stellar disk. We demonstrate that if a stellar disk is rotationally supported, it is likely that a galaxy has sufficient dark matter, that the dynamics of the GCS can be used to reliably estimate the enclosed mass.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and spectroscopy of the gravitational lens SL2SJ02176-0513, a cusp arc at z=1.847. The UV continuum of the lensed galaxy is very blue, which is seemingly at odds with its redder optical colors. The 3D-HST WFC3/G141 near-infrared spectrum of the lens reveals the source of this discrepancy to be extremely strong [OIII]5007 and H-beta emission lines with rest-frame equivalent widths of 2000 +/- 100 and 520 +/- 40 Angstroms, respectively. The source has a stellar mass ~10^8 Msun, sSFR \sim 100/Gyr, and detection of [OIII]4363 yields a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.5 +/- 0.2. We identify local blue compact dwarf analogs to SL2SJ02176-0513, which are among the most metal-poor galaxies in the SDSS. The local analogs resemble the lensed galaxy in many ways, including UV/optical SED, spatial morphology and emission line equivalent widths and ratios. Common to SL2SJ02176-0513 and its local counterparts is an upturn at mid-IR wavelengths likely arising from hot dust heated by starbursts. The emission lines of SL2SJ02176-0513 are spatially resolved owing to the combination of the lens and the high spatial resolution of HST. The lensed galaxy is composed of two clumps with combined size r_e \sim 300 pc, and we resolve significant differences in UV color and emission line equivalent width between them. Though it has characteristics occasionally attributed to active galactic nuclei, we conclude that SL2SJ02176-0513 is a low-metallicity star-bursting dwarf galaxy. Such galaxies will be found in significant numbers in the full 3D-HST grism survey.
  • According to the current cosmological paradigm, large scale structures form hierarchically in the Universe. Clusters of galaxies grow through a continuous accretion of mass. Nevertheless, the rate and manner of mass accretion events are still matters of debate. We have analysed the presence of substructures in one of the largest sample of nearby cluster galaxies available in the literature. We have determined the fraction of clusters with substructure and the properties of the galaxies located in such substructures. Substructure in the galaxy clusters was studied using the Dressler--Shectman test, which was calibrated through extensive Monte Carlo simulations of galaxy clusters similar to real ones. In order to avoid possible biases in the results due to differing incompleteness among clusters, we selected two galaxy populations: a) galaxies brighter than M$_{r} = $-20 located in clusters at $z < 0.1$ (EC1); and b) galaxies of brightness $M_{r} < -19$ located at $z<0.07$ (EC2). In the inner cluster regions ($r < r_{200}$) 11$\%$ and 33$\%$ of the clusters of EC1 and EC2 respectively show substructure. This fraction is larger in the outer cluster regions ($\approx 55\%$) for EC1 and EC2 samples. Cluster global properties, such as $\sigma_{c}$, $f_{b}$ or $\Delta m_{12}$ do not depend on the amount of cluster substructure. We have studied the properties of individual galaxies located in substructures in the EC1 and EC2 galaxy populations. The fraction of galaxies within substructures is larger in the outer cluster regions when fainter galaxies are included. The distribution of relative velocities of galaxies within substructures suggest that they consist of an infalling population mixed with backsplash galaxies. We can not rule out that the infalling galaxy population located in substructures are genuine field ones.