• Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the emergence and evolution of oscillations in traffic flow has been subject to intensive research by the traffic flow theory community. In our previous work, we proposed a new mechanism to explain the generation of traffic oscillations: traffic instability caused by the competition between speed adaptation and the cumulative effect of stochastic factors. In this paper, by conducting a closer examination of car following data obtained in a 25-car platoon experiment, we discovered that the speed difference plays a more important role on car-following dynamics than the spacing, and when its amplitude is small, the growth of oscillations is mainly determined by the stochastic factors that follow the mean reversion process; when its amplitude increases, the growth of the oscillations is determined by the competition between the stochastic factors and the speed difference. An explanation is then provided, based on the above findings, to why the speed variance in the oscillatory traffic grows in a concave way along the platoon. Finally, we proposed a mode-switching stochastic car-following model that incorporates the speed adaptation and spacing indifference behaviors of drivers, which captures the observed characteristics of oscillation and discharge rate. Sensitivity analysis shows that reaction delay only has slight effect but indifference region boundary has significant on oscillation growth rate and discharge rate.
  • This paper has incorporated the stochasticity into the Newell car following model. Three stochastic driving factors have been considered: (i) Driver's acceleration is bounded. (ii) Driver's deceleration includes stochastic component, which is depicted by a deceleration with the randomization probability that is assumed to increase with the speed. (iii) Vehicles in the jam state have a larger randomization probability. Two simulation scenarios are conducted to test the model. In the first scenario, traffic flow on a circular road is investigated. In the second scenario, empirical traffic flow patterns in the NGSIM data induced by a rubberneck bottleneck is studied, and the simulated traffic oscillations and synchronized traffic flow are consistent with the empirical patterns. Moreover, two experiments of model calibration and validation are conducted. The first is to calibrate and validate using experimental data, which illustrates that the concave growth pattern has been quantitatively simulated. The second is to calibrate and cross validate vehicles' trajectories using NGSIM data, which exhibits that the car following behaviors of single vehicles can be well described. Therefore, our study highlights the importance of speed dependent stochasticity in traffic flow modeling, which cannot be ignored as in most car-following studies.
  • In this paper, we present the Role Playing Learning (RPL) scheme for a mobile robot to navigate socially with its human companion in populated environments. Neural networks (NN) are constructed to parameterize a stochastic policy that directly maps sensory data collected by the robot to its velocity outputs, while respecting a set of social norms. An efficient simulative learning environment is built with maps and pedestrians trajectories collected from a number of real-world crowd data sets. In each learning iteration, a robot equipped with the NN policy is created virtually in the learning environment to play itself as a companied pedestrian and navigate towards a goal in a socially concomitant manner. Thus, we call this process Role Playing Learning, which is formulated under a reinforcement learning (RL) framework. The NN policy is optimized end-to-end using Trust Region Policy Optimization (TRPO), with consideration of the imperfectness of robot's sensor measurements. Simulative and experimental results are provided to demonstrate the efficacy and superiority of our method.
  • We use high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electronic structure calculations to study the electronic properties of rare-earth monoantimonides RSb (R = Y, Ce, Gd, Dy, Ho, Tm, Lu). The experimentally measured Fermi surface (FS) of RSb consists of at least two concentric hole pockets at the $\Gamma$ point and two intersecting electron pockets at the $X$ point. These data agree relatively well with the electronic structure calculations. Detailed photon energy dependence measurements using both synchrotron and laser ARPES systems indicate that there is at least one Fermi surface sheet with strong three-dimensionality centered at the $\Gamma$ point. Due to the "lanthanide contraction", the unit cell of different rare-earth monoantimonides shrinks when changing rare-earth ion from CeSb to LuSb. This results in the differences in the chemical potentials in these compounds, which is demonstrated by both ARPES measurements and electronic structure calculations. Interestingly, in CeSb, the intersecting electron pockets at the $X$ point seem to be touching the valence bands, forming a four-fold degenerate Dirac-like feature. On the other hand, the remaining rare-earth monoantimonides show significant gaps between the upper and lower bands at the $X$ point. Furthermore, similar to the previously reported results of LaBi, a Dirac-like structure was observed at the $\Gamma$ point in YSb, CeSb, and GdSb, compounds showing relatively high magnetoresistance. This Dirac-like structure may contribute to the unusually large magnetoresistance in these compounds.
  • Traffic breakdown, as one of the most puzzling traffic flow phenomena, is characterized by sharply decreasing speed, abruptly increasing density and in particular suddenly plummeting capacity. In order to clarify its root mechanisms and model its observed properties, this paper proposes a car-following model based on the following assumptions: (i) There exists a preferred time-varied and speed-dependent space gap that cars hope to maintain; (ii) there exists a region R restricted by two critical space gaps and two critical speeds in the car following region on the speed-space gap diagram, in which cars' movements are determined by the weighted mean of the space- gap-determined acceleration and the speed-difference-determined acceleration; and (iii) out of region R, cars either accelerate to the free flow speed or decelerate to keep safety. Simulation results show that this model is able to simultaneously reproduce traffic breakdown and the transition from the synchronized traffic flow to wide moving jams. To our knowledge, this is the first car-following model that is able to fully depict traffic breakdown, spontaneous formation of jams, and the concave growth of the oscillations.
  • The intersecting pedestrian flow on the 2D lattice with random update rule is studied. Each pedestrian has three moving directions without the back step. Under periodic boundary conditions, an intermediate phase has been found at which some pedestrians could move along the border of jamming stripes. We have performed mean field analysis for the moving and intermediate phase respectively. The analytical results agree with the simulation results well. The empty site moves along the interface of jamming stripes when the system only has one empty site. The average movement of empty site in one Monte Carlo step (MCS) has been analyzed through the master equation. Under open boundary conditions, the system exhibits moving and jamming phases. The critical injection probability $\alpha_c$ shows nontrivially against the forward moving probability $q$. The analytical results of average velocity, the density and the flow rate against the injection probability in the moving phase also agree with simulation results well.
  • This paper has investigated the growth pattern of traffic oscillations in the NGSIM vehicle trajectories data, via measuring the standard deviation of vehicle velocity involved in oscillations. We found that the standard deviation of the velocity increases in a concave way along vehicles in the oscillations. Moreover, all datasets collapse into a single concave curve, which indicates a universal evolution law of oscillations. A comparison with traffic experiment shows that the empirical and the experimental results are highly compatible and can be fitted by a single concave curve, which demonstrates that qualitatively the growth pattern of oscillations is not affected by type of bottleneck and lane changing behavior. We have shown theoretically that small disturbances increase in a convex way in the initial stage in the traditional models presuming a unique relationship between speed and density, which obviously deviates from our findings. Simulations show that stochastic models in which the traffic state dynamically spans a 2D region in the speed-spacing plane can qualitatively or even quantitatively reproduce the concave growth pattern of traffic oscillations.
  • As one of the paradigmatic models of non-equilibrium systems, the asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) has been widely used to study many physical, chemical, and biological systems. The ASEP shows a range of nontrivial macroscopic phenomena, among which, the spontaneous symmetry breaking has gained much attention. Nevertheless, as a basic problem, it has been controversial that whether there exist one or two symmetry-broken phases in the ASEP. Based on mean field analysis and current minimization principle, this paper demonstrates that one of the broken-symmetry phases does not exist in a bidirectional two-lane ASEP with narrow entrances. Moreover, an exponential decay feature is observed, which has been used to predict phase boundary in the thermodynamic limit. Our findings might be generalized to other ASEP models and thus deepen the understanding of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in non-equilibrium systems.
  • This paper firstly show that 2 Dimensional Intelligent Driver Model (Jiang et al., PloS one, 9(4), e94351, 2014) is not able to replicate the synchronized traffic flow. Then we propose an improved model by considering the difference between the driving behaviors at high speeds and that at low speeds. Simulations show that the improved model can reproduce the phase transition from synchronized flow to wide moving jams, the spatiotemporal patterns of traffic flow induced by traffic bottleneck, and the evolution concavity of traffic oscillations (i.e. the standard deviation of the velocities of vehicles increases in a concave/linear way along the platoon). Validating results show that the empirical time series of traffic speed obtained from Floating Car Data can be well simulated as well.
  • This paper has investigated the growth pattern of traffic oscillations by using vehicle trajectory data in a car following experiment. We measured the standard deviation of acceleration, emission and fuel consumption of each vehicle in the car-following platoon. We found that: (1) Similar to the standard deviation of speed, these indices exhibit a common feature of concave growth pattern along vehicles in the platoon; (2) The emission and fuel consumption of each vehicle decrease remarkably when the average speed of the platoon increases from low value; However, when reaches 30km/h, the change of emission and fuel consumption with is not so significant; (3), the correlations of emission and fuel consumption with both the standard deviation of acceleration and the speed oscillation are strong. Simulations show that with the memory effect of drivers taken into account, the improved two-dimensional intelligent driver model is able to reproduce the common feature of traffic oscillation evolution quite well.
  • This paper has studied the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection, taking into account the dynamical evolution process of queues. The feature of delay function has been studied, which indicates that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved when equality holds in at least one of the two constraints. We have derived the minimum delay as well as the corresponding traffic signal period, which shows that two situations are classified. Under certain circumstance, extra green time is needed for one phase while otherwise no extra green time should be assigned in both phases. Our work indicates that although the clearing policies were shown in many experiments to be optimal at isolated intersections, it is sometimes not the case.
  • In this paper, the impact of holding umbrella on the uni- and bi-directional flow has been investigated via experiment and modeling. In the experiments, pedestrians are required to walk clockwise/anti-clockwise in a ring-shaped corridor under normal situation and holding umbrella situation. No matter in uni- or bi-directional flow, the flow rate under holding umbrella situation decreases comparing with that in normal situation. In bidirectional flow, pedestrians segregate into two opposite moving streams very quickly under normal situation, and clockwise/anti-clockwise walking pedestrians are always in the inner/outer lane due to right-walking preference. Under holding umbrella situation, spontaneous lane formation has also occurred. However, when holding umbrella, pedestrians may separate into more than two lanes. Moreover, the merge of lanes have been observed, and clockwise/anti-clockwise pedestrians are not always in the inner/outer lane. To model the flow dynamics, an improved force-based model has been proposed. The contact force between umbrellas has been taken into account. Simulation results are in agreement with the experimental ones.
  • In this paper, the impact of escaping in couples on the evacuation dynamics has been investigated via experiments and modeling. Two sets of experiments have been implemented, in which pedestrians are asked to escape either in individual or in couples. The experiments show that escaping in couples can decrease the average evacuation time. Moreover, it is found that the average evacuation time gap is essentially constant, which means that the evacuation speed essentially does not depend on the number of pedestrians that have not yet escaped. To model the evacuation dynamics, an improved social force model has been proposed, in which it is assumed that the driving force of a pedestrian cannot be fulfilled when the composition of physical forces exceeds a threshold because the pedestrian cannot keep his/her body balance under this circumstance. To model the effect of escaping in couples, attraction force has been introduced between the partners. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.
  • This paper firstly show that a recent model (Tian et al., Transpn. Res. B 71, 138-157, 2015) is not able to well replicate the evolution concavity in traffic flow, i.e. the standard deviation of vehicles increases in a concave/linear way along the platoon. Then we propose an improved model by introducing the safe speed, the logistic function of the randomization probability, and small randomization deceleration for low-speed vehicles into the model. Simulations show that the improved model can well reproduce the metastable states, the spatiotemporal patterns, the phase transition behaviors of traffic flow, and the evolution concavity of traffic oscillations. Validating results show that the empirical time series of traffic speed obtained from Floating Car Data can be well simulated as well.
  • We have carried out car-following experiments with a 25-car-platoon on an open road section to study the relation between a car's speed and its spacing under various traffic conditions, in the hope to resolve a controversy surrounding this fundamental relation of vehicular traffic. In this paper we extend our previous analysis of these experiments, and report new experimental findings. In particular, we reveal that the platoon length (hence the average spacing within a platoon) might be significantly different even if the average velocity of the platoon is essentially the same. The findings further demonstrate that the traffic states span a 2D region in the speed-spacing (or density) plane. The common practice of using a single speed-spacing curve to model vehicular traffic ignores the variability and imprecision of human driving and is therefore inadequate. We have proposed a car-following model based on a mechanism that in certain ranges of speed and spacing, drivers are insensitive to the changes in spacing when the velocity differences between cars are small. It was shown that the model can reproduce the experimental results well.
  • We use tunable laser based Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of the multi-band superconductor, MgB2. These results form the base line for detailed studies of superconductivity in multi-band systems. We find that the magnitude of the superconducting gap on both sigma bands follows a BCS-like variation with temperature with Delta0 ~7 meV. The value of the gap is isotropic within experimental uncertainty and in agreement with pure a s-wave pairing symmetry. We also observe in-gap states confined to kF of the sigma band that occur at some locations of the sample surface. The energy of this excitation, ~3 meV, is inconsistent with scattering from the pi band.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study heavy fermion superconductor Ce2RhIn8. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pock- ets. We do not observe kz dispersion of Fermi sheets, which is consistent with 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data and band structure calculations points to a localized picture of f electrons. Our findings pave the way for understanding the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.
  • We use a tunable laser ARPES to study the electronic properties of the prototypical multiband BCS superconductor MgB2. Our data reveal a strong renormalization of the dispersion (kink) at ~65 meV, which is caused by coupling of electrons to the E2g phonon mode. In contrast to cuprates, the 65 meV kink in MgB2 does not change significantly across Tc. More interestingly, we observe strong coupling to a second, lower energy collective mode at binding energy of 10 meV. This excitation vanishes above Tc and is likely a signature of the elusive Leggett mode.
  • This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton traffic flow model based on the brake light model, which takes into account that the desired time gap of vehicles is remarkably larger than one second. Although the hypothetical steady state of vehicles in the deterministic limit corresponds to a unique relationship between speeds and gaps in the proposed model, the traffic states of vehicles dynamically span a two-dimensional region in the plane of speed versus gap, due to the various randomizations. It is shown that the model is able to well reproduce (i) the free flow, synchronized flow, jam as well as the transitions among the three phases; (ii) the evolution features of disturbances and the spatiotemporal patterns in a car-following platoon; (iii) the empirical time series of traffic speed obtained from NGSIM data. Therefore, we argue that a model can potentially reproduce the empirical and experimental features of traffic flow, provided that the traffic states are able to dynamically span a 2D speed-gap region.
  • This Letter studies a weakly and asymmetrically coupled three-lane driven diffusive system. A non-monotonically changing density profile in the middle lane has been observed. When the extreme value of the density profile reaches $\rho=0.5$, a bulk induced phase transition occurs which exhibits a shock and a continuously and smoothly decreasing density profile which crosses $\rho=0.5$ upstream or downstream of the shock. The existence of double shocks has also been observed. A mean-field approach has been used to interpret the numerical results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. The current minimization principle has excluded the occurrence of two or more bulk induced shocks in the general case of nonzero lane changing rates.
  • We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable VUV laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3eV and 7eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on KBBF crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10^14 photons/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the kz dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electronic structure of CaFe$_2$As$_2$ in previously unexplored collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase. This unusual phase of the iron arsenic high temperature superconductors was hard to measure as it exists only under pressure. By inducing internal strain, via the post growth, thermal treatment of the single crystals, we were able to stabilize the CT phase at ambient-pressure. We find significant differences in the Fermi surface topology and band dispersion data from the more common orthorhombic-antiferromagnetic or tetragonal-paramagnetic phases, consistent with electronic structure calculations. The top of the hole bands sinks below the Fermi level, which destroys the nesting present in parent phases. The absence of nesting in this phase along with apparent loss of Fe magnetic moment, are now clearly experimentally correlated with the lack of superconductivity in this phase.
  • As a typical self-driven many-particle system far from equilibrium, traffic flow exhibits diverse fascinating non-equilibrium phenomena, most of which are closely related to traffic flow stability and specifically the growth/dissipation pattern of disturbances. However, the traffic theories have been controversial due to a lack of precise traffic data. We have studied traffic flow from a new perspective by carrying out large-scale car-following experiment on an open road section, which overcomes the intrinsic deficiency of empirical observations. The experiment has shown clearly the nature of car-following, which runs against the traditional traffic flow theory. Simulations show that by removing the fundamental notion in the traditional car-following models and allowing the traffic state to span a two-dimensional region in velocity-spacing plane, the growth pattern of disturbances has changed qualitatively and becomes qualitatively or even quantitatively in consistent with that observed in the experiment.
  • Maximum likelihood is a popular technique for isoform reconstruction. Here, we show that isoform reconstruction using short RNA-Seq reads by maximum likelihood is NP-hard.
  • We have performed detailed studies of the temperature evolution of the electronic structure in Ba(Fe(1-x)Ru(x))2As2 using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). Surprisingly, we find that the binding energy of both hole and electron bands changes significantly with temperature in pure and Ru substituted samples. The hole and electron pockets are well nested at low temperature in unsubstituted (BaFe2As2) samples, which likely drives the spin density wave (SDW) and resulting antiferromagnetic order. Upon warming, this nesting is degraded as the hole pocket shrinks and the electron pocket expands. Our results demonstrate that the temperature dependent nesting may play an important role in driving the antiferromagnetic/paramagnetic phase transition.