• We investigate the constraints on the total neutrino mass in the scenario of vacuum energy interacting with cold dark matter. We focus on two typical interaction forms, i.e., $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ and $Q=\beta H\rho_{\Lambda}$. To avoid the occurrence of large-scale instability in interacting dark energy cosmology, we adopt the parameterized post-Friedmann approach to calculate the perturbation evolution of dark energy. We employ the observational data including the Planck cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the JLA sample of type Ia supernovae observation, the direct measurement of the Hubble constant, and the redshift space distortions data. We find that, compared with those in the $\Lambda$CDM model, much looser constraints on $\sum m_{\nu}$ are obtained in the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ model, while slightly tighter constraints are obtained in the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\Lambda}$ model. After considering the mass hierarchies of neutrinos, the smallest upper limit results of $\sum m_{\nu}$ are given in the degenerate hierarchy case. By comparing the values of $\chi^2_{\rm min}$, we find that the normal hierarchy case is more favored than the inverted one. In particular, we find that the difference $\Delta \chi^2_{\rm min} \equiv \chi^2_{\rm IH; min}-\chi^2_{\rm NH; min}> 2$ in the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ model. In addition, we find that $\beta=0$ is consistent with the current observations in the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ model, and $\beta < 0$ is favored at the more than $1\sigma$ level in the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\Lambda}$ model.
  • We investigate the observational constraints on three typical brane inflation models by considering the latest local measurement of the Hubble constant in the global fit. We also employ other observational data, including the Planck 2015 CMB data, the BICEP2/Keck Array B-mode data, and the baryon acoustic oscillations data, in our analysis. Previous studies have shown that the addition of the latest local $H_{0}$ measurement favors a larger spectral index, and can exert a significant influence on the model selection of inflation. In this work, we investigate its impacts on the statuses of brane inflation models. We find that, when the direct $H_{0}$ measurement is considered, the prototype model of brane inflation is still in good agreement with the current observational data at the $2\sigma$ level. For the KKLMMT model, the consideration of the $H_{0}$ measurement allows the range of the parameter $\beta$ to be amplified to ${\cal O}(10^{-2})$, which slightly alleviates the fine-tuning problem. For the IR DBI model, the addition of the $H_{0}$ measurement does not provide a better fit. These results show that the consideration of the new $H_{0}$ prior can exert a considerable influence on the brane inflation models. At last, we show that, when $\beta \lesssim 0.7$, the equilateral non-Gaussianity in the IR DBI inflation model is compatible with the current CMB data at the 1$\sigma$ level.
  • We revisit the constraints on inflation models by using the current cosmological observations involving the latest local measurement of the Hubble constant ($H_{0} = 73.00\pm 1.75$ km s $^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$). We constrain the primordial power spectra of both scalar and tensor perturbations with the observational data including the Planck 2015 CMB full data, the BICEP2 and Keck Array CMB B-mode data, the BAO data, and the direct measurement of $H_0$. In order to relieve the tension between the local determination of the Hubble constant and the other astrophysical observations, we consider the additional parameter $N_{\rm eff}$ in the cosmological model. We find that, for the $\Lambda$CDM+$r$+$N_{\rm eff}$ model, the scale invariance is only excluded at the 3.3$\sigma$ level, and $\Delta N_{\rm eff}>0$ is favored at the 1.6$\sigma$ level. Comparing the obtained 1$\sigma$ and 2$\sigma$ contours of $(n_s,r)$ with the theoretical predictions of selected inflation models, we find that both the convex and concave potentials are favored at 2$\sigma$ level, the natural inflation model is excluded at more than 2$\sigma$ level, the Starobinsky $R^2$ inflation model is only favored at around 2$\sigma$ level, and the spontaneously broken SUSY inflation model is now the most favored model.
  • We constrain the neutrino mass in the scenario of vacuum energy interacting with cold dark matter by using current cosmological observations. To avoid the large-scale instability problem in interacting dark energy models, we employ the parameterized post-Friedmann (PPF) approach to do the calculation of perturbation evolution, for the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ and $Q=\beta H\rho_{\Lambda}$ models. The current observational data sets used in this work include Planck (cosmic microwave background), BSH (baryon acoustic oscillations, type Ia supernovae, and Hubble constant), and LSS (redshift space distortions and weak lensing). According to the constraint results, we find that $\beta>0$ at more than $1\sigma$ level for the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ model, which indicates that cold dark matter decays into vacuum energy; while $\beta=0$ is consistent with the current data at $1\sigma$ level for the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\Lambda}$ model. Taking the $\Lambda$CDM model as a baseline model, we find that a smaller upper limit, $\sum m_{\nu}<0.11$ eV ($2\sigma$), is induced by the latest BAO BOSS DR12 data and the Hubble constant measurement $H_{0} = 73.00 \pm 1.75$ km~s$^{-1}$~Mpc$^{-1}$. For the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\rm c}$ model, we obtain $\sum m_{\nu}<0.20$ eV ($2\sigma$) from Planck+BSH. For the $Q=\beta H\rho_{\Lambda}$ model, $\sum m_{\nu}<0.10$ eV ($2\sigma$) and $\sum m_{\nu}<0.14$ eV ($2\sigma$) are derived from Planck+BSH and Planck+BSH+LSS, respectively. We show that these smaller upper limits on $\sum m_{\nu}$ are affected more or less by the tension between $H_{0}$ and other observational data.
  • Dark energy affects the Hubble expansion rate (namely, the expansion history) $H(z)$ by an integral over $w(z)$. However, the usual observables are the luminosity distances or the angular diameter distances, which measure the distance-redshift relation. Actually, dark energy affects the distances (and the growth factor) by a further integration over functions of $H(z)$. Thus, the direct measurements of the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ at different redshifts are of great importance for constraining the properties of dark energy. In this paper, we show how the typical dark energy models, for example, the $\Lambda$CDM, $w$CDM, CPL, and holographic dark energy (HDE) models, can be constrained by the current direct measurements of $H(z)$ (31 data in total, covering the redshift range of $z\in [0.07,2.34]$). In fact, the future redshift-drift observations (also referred to as the Sandage-Loeb test) can also directly measure $H(z)$ at higher redshifts, covering the range of $z\in [2,5]$. We thus discuss what role the redshift-drift observations can play in constraining dark energy with the Hubble parameter measurements. We show that the constraints on dark energy can be improved greatly with the $H(z)$ data from only a 10-year observation of redshift drift.
  • We explore the impact of the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test on the precision of cosmological constraints for $f(T)$ gravity theories. The SL test is an important supplement to current cosmological observations because it measures the redshift drift in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest in the spectra of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of $2 \lesssim z \lesssim5$. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. We quantify the impact of these SL test data on parameter estimation for $f(T)$ gravity theories. Two typical $f(T)$ models are considered, the power-law model $f(T)_{PL}$ and the exponential-form model $f(T)_{EXP}$. The results show that the SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density $\Omega_m$ and the Hubble constant $H_0$ in other cosmological observations. For the considered $f(T)$ models, a 30-year observation of the SL test can improve the constraint precision of $\Omega_m$ and $H_0$ enormously but cannot effectively improve the constraint precision of the model parameters.