• The success of quantum optimal control for both experimental and theoretical objectives is connected to the topology of the corresponding control landscapes, which are free from local traps if three conditions are met: (1) the quantum system is controllable, (2) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is of full rank, and (3) there are no constraints on the control field. This paper investigates how the violation of assumption (3) affects gradient searches for globally optimal control fields. The satisfaction of assumptions (1) and (2) ensures that the control landscape lacks fundamental traps, but certain control constraints can still introduce artificial traps. Proper management of these constraints is an issue of great practical importance for numerical simulations as well as optimization in the laboratory. Using optimal control simulations, we show that constraints on quantities such as the number of control variables, the control duration, and the field strength are potentially severe enough to prevent successful optimization of the objective. For each such constraint, we show that exceeding quantifiable limits can prevent gradient searches from reaching a globally optimal solution. These results demonstrate that careful choice of relevant control parameters helps to eliminate artificial traps and facilitate successful optimization.
  • Quantum optimal control has enjoyed wide success for a variety of theoretical and experimental objectives. These favorable results have been attributed to advantageous properties of the corresponding control landscapes, which are free from local optima if three conditions are met: (1) the quantum system is controllable, (2) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is full rank, and (3) the control field is not constrained. This paper explores how gradient searches for globally optimal control fields are affected by deviations from assumption (2). In some quantum control problems, so-called singular critical points, at which the Jacobian is rank-deficient, may exist on the landscape. Using optimal control simulations, we show that search failure is only observed when a singular critical point is also a second-order trap, which occurs if the control problem meets additional conditions involving the system Hamiltonian and/or the control objective. All known second-order traps occur at constant control fields, and we also show that they only affect searches that originate very close to them. As a result, even when such traps exist on the control landscape, they are unlikely to affect well-designed gradient optimizations under realistic searching conditions.
  • Robust control design for quantum systems has been recognized as a key task in the development of practical quantum technology. In this paper, we present a systematic numerical methodology of sampling-based learning control (SLC) for control design of quantum systems with Hamiltonian uncertainties. The SLC method includes two steps of "training" and "testing and evaluation". In the training step, an augmented system is constructed by sampling uncertainties according to possible distributions of uncertainty parameters. A gradient flow based learning and optimization algorithm is adopted to find the control for the augmented system. In the process of testing and evaluation, a number of samples obtained through sampling the uncertainties are tested to evaluate the control performance. Numerical results demonstrate the success of the SLC approach. The SLC method has potential applications for robust control design of quantum systems.
  • Compensation for parameter dispersion is a significant challenge for control of inhomogeneous quantum ensembles. In this paper, we present a systematic methodology of sampling-based learning control (SLC) for simultaneously steering the members of inhomogeneous quantum ensembles to the same desired state. The SLC method is employed for optimal control of the state-to-state transition probability for inhomogeneous quantum ensembles of spins as well as $\Lambda$ type atomic systems. The procedure involves the steps of (i) training and (ii) testing. In the training step, a generalized system is constructed by sampling members according to the distribution of inhomogeneous parameters drawn from the ensemble. A gradient flow based learning and optimization algorithm is adopted to find the control for the generalized system. In the process of testing, a number of additional ensemble members are randomly selected to evaluate the control performance. Numerical results are presented showing the success of the SLC method.
  • Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on a) a model diatomic molecule, b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous state-to-state transition probability control landscape of N-level quantum systems. The absence of traps in both circumstances provides a broader basis to understand the growing number of successful control experiments with complex molecules, which can have dynamics that transcend the classical and quantum regimes.
  • Let (SD_\Omega) be the Stokes operator defined in a bounded domain \Omega of R^3 with Dirichlet boundary conditions. We prove that, generically with respect to the domain \Omega with C^5 boundary, the spectrum of (SD_\Omega) satisfies a non resonant property introduced by C. Foias and J. C. Saut to linearize the Navier-Stokes system in a bounded domain \Omega of R^3 with Dirichlet boundary conditions. For that purpose, we first prove that, generically with respect to the domain \Omega with C^5 boundary, all the eigenvalues of (SD_\Omega) are simple. That answers positively a question raised by J. H. Ortega and E. Zuazua. The proofs of these results follow a standard strategy based on a contradiction argument requiring shape differentiation. One needs to shape differentiate at least twice the initial problem in the direction of carefully chosen domain variations. The main step of the contradiction argument amounts to study the evaluation of Dirichlet-to-Neumann operators associated to these domain variations.
  • Many quantum control problems are formulated as a search for an optimal field that maximizes a physical objective. This search is performed over a landscape defined as the objective as a function of the control field. A recent Letter [A. N. Pechen and D. J. Tannor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 120402 (2011)] asserts that the existence of special landscape critical points (CPs) with trapping characteristics is "contrary to recent claims in the literature" and "can have profound implications for both theoretical and experimental quantum control studies." We show here that these assertions are inaccurate and misleading.
  • We propose in this paper a gradient-type dynamical system to solve the problem of maximizing quantum observables for finite dimensional closed quantum ensembles governed by the controlled Liouville-von Neumann equation. The asymptotic behavior is analyzed: we show that under the regularity assumption on the controls the dynamical system almost always converges to a solution of the maximization problem; we also detail the difficulties related to the occurrence of singular controls.