• We report on the AAT-AAOmega LRG Pilot observing run to establish the feasibility of a large spectroscopic survey using the new AAOmega instrument. We have selected Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) using single epoch SDSS riz-photometry to i<20.5 and z<20.2. We have observed in 3 fields including the COSMOS field and the COMBO-17 S11 field, obtaining a sample of ~600 redshift z>=0.5 LRGs. Exposure times varied from 1 - 4 hours to determine the minimum exposure for AAOmega to make an essentially complete LRG redshift survey in average conditions. We show that LRG redshifts to i<20.5 can measured in approximately 1.5hr exposures and present comparisons with 2SLAQ and COMBO-17 (photo-)redshifts. Crucially, the riz selection coupled with the 3-4 times improved AAOmega throughput is shown to extend the LRG mean redshift from z=0.55 for 2SLAQ to z=0.681+/- 0.005 for riz-selected LRGs. This extended range is vital for maximising the S/N for the detection of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Furthermore, we show that the amplitude of LRG clustering is s_0 = 9.9+/-0.7 h^-1 Mpc, as high as that seen in the 2SLAQ LRG Survey. Consistent results for the real-space amplitude are found from projected and semi-projected correlation functions. This high clustering amplitude is consistent with a long-lived population whose bias evolves as predicted by a simple ``high-peaks'' model. We conclude that a redshift survey of 360 000 LRGs over 3000deg^2, with an effective volume some 4 times bigger than previously used to detect BAO with LRGs, is possible with AAOmega in 170 nights.
  • We have combined optical data from the 2dF-SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy and QSO (2SLAQ) redshift survey with radio measurements from the 1.4 GHz VLA FIRST and NVSS surveys to identify a volume-limited sample of 391 radio galaxies at redshift 0.4<z<0.7. By determining an accurate radio luminosity function for early-type galaxies in this redshift range, we can investigate the cosmic evolution of the radio-galaxy population over a wide range in radio luminosity. The low-power radio galaxies in our LRG sample (those with 1.4 GHz radio luminosities in the range 10^{24} to 10^{25} W/Hz, corresponding to FR I radio galaxies in the local universe) undergo significant cosmic evolution over the redshift range 0<z<0.7, consistent with pure luminosity evolution of the form (1+z)^k where k=2.0+/-0.3. Our results appear to rule out (at the 6-7 sigma level) models in which low-power radio galaxies undergo no cosmic evolution. The most powerful radio galaxies in our sample (with radio luminosities above 10^{26} W/Hz) may undergo more rapid evolution over the same redshift range. The evolution seen in the low-power radio-galaxy population implies that the total energy input into massive early-type galaxies from AGN heating increases with redshift, and was roughly 50% higher at z~0.55 (the median redshift of the 2SLAQ LRG sample) than in the local universe.
  • Abundance ratios relative to iron for carbon, nitrogen, strontium and barium are presented for a metal-rich main sequence star ([Fe/H]=--0.74) in the globular cluster omega Centauri. This star, designated 2015448, shows depleted carbon and solar nitrogen, but more interestingly, shows an enhanced abundance ratio of strontium [Sr/Fe] ~ 1.6 dex, while the barium abundance ratio is [Ba/Fe]<0.6 dex. At this metallicity one usually sees strontium and barium abundance ratios that are roughly equal. Possible formation scenarios of this peculiar object are considered.
  • Radio continuum surveys can detect galaxies over a very wide range in redshift, making them powerful tools for studying the distant universe. Until recently, though, identifying the optical counterparts of faint radio sources and measuring their redshifts was a slow and laborious process which could only be carried out for relatively small samples of galaxies. Combining data from all-sky radio continuum surveys with optical spectra from the new large-area redshift surveys now makes it possible to measure redshifts for tens of thousands of radio-emitting galaxies, as well as determining unambiguously whether the radio emission in each galaxy arises mainly from an active nucleus (AGN) or from processes related to star formation. Here we present some results from a recent study of radio-source populations in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, including a new derivation of the local star-formation density, and discuss the prospects for future studies of galaxy evolution using both radio and optical data.
  • We have cross-matched the 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) with the first 210 fields observed in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), covering an effective area of 325 square degrees (about 20% of the final 2dFGRS area). This yields a set of optical spectra of 912 candidate NVSS counterparts, of which we identify 757 as genuine radio IDs - the largest and most homogeneous set of radio-source spectra ever obtained. The 2dFGRS radio sources span the redshift range z=0.005 to 0.438, and are a mixture of active galaxies (60%) and star-forming galaxies (40%). About 25% of the 2dFGRS radio sources are spatially resolved by NVSS, and the sample includes three giant radio galaxies with projected linear size greater than 1 Mpc. The high quality of the 2dF spectra means we can usually distinguish unambiguously between AGN and star-forming galaxies. We have made a new determination of the local radio luminosity function at 1.4 GHz for both active and star-forming galaxies, and derive a local star-formation density of 0.022+/-0.004 solar masses per year per cubic Mpc. (Ho=50 km/s/Mpc).