• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • We present deep spectroscopic observations of a Lyman-break galaxy candidate (hereafter MACS1149-JD) at $z\sim9.5$ with the $\textit{Hubble}$ Space Telescope ($\textit{HST}$) WFC3/IR grisms. The grism observations were taken at 4 distinct position angles, totaling 34 orbits with the G141 grism, although only 19 of the orbits are relatively uncontaminated along the trace of MACS1149-JD. We fit a 3-parameter ($z$, F160W mag, and Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width) Lyman-break galaxy template to the three least contaminated grism position angles using an MCMC approach. The grism data alone are best fit with a redshift of $z_{\mathrm{grism}}=9.53^{+0.39}_{-0.60}$ ($68\%$ confidence), in good agreement with our photometric estimate of $z_{\mathrm{phot}}=9.51^{+0.06}_{-0.12}$ ($68\%$ confidence). Our analysis rules out Lyman-alpha emission from MACS1149-JD above a $3\sigma$ equivalent width of 21 \AA{}, consistent with a highly neutral IGM. We explore a scenario where the red $\textit{Spitzer}$/IRAC $[3.6] - [4.5]$ color of the galaxy previously pointed out in the literature is due to strong rest-frame optical emission lines from a very young stellar population rather than a 4000 \AA{} break. We find that while this can provide an explanation for the observed IRAC color, it requires a lower redshift ($z\lesssim9.1$), which is less preferred by the $\textit{HST}$ imaging data. The grism data are consistent with both scenarios, indicating that the red IRAC color can still be explained by a 4000 \AA{} break, characteristic of a relatively evolved stellar population. In this interpretation, the photometry indicate that a $340^{+29}_{-35}$ Myr stellar population is already present in this galaxy only $\sim500~\mathrm{Myr}$ after the Big Bang.
  • We present a study of the trade-off between depth and resolution using a large number of U-band imaging observations in the GOODS-North field (Giavalisco et al. 2004) from the Large Binocular Camera (LBC) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Having acquired over 30 hours of data (315 images with 5-6 mins exposures), we generated multiple image mosaics, starting with the best atmospheric seeing images (FWHM $\lesssim$0.8"), which constitute $\sim$10% of the total data set. For subsequent mosaics, we added in data with larger seeing values until the final, deepest mosaic included all images with FWHM $\lesssim$1.8" ($\sim$94% of the total data set). From the mosaics, we made object catalogs to compare the optimal-resolution, yet shallower image to the lower-resolution but deeper image. We show that the number counts for both images are $\sim$90% complete to $U_{AB}$ $\lesssim26$. Fainter than $U_{AB}$$\sim$ 27, the object counts from the optimal-resolution image start to drop-off dramatically (90% between $U_{AB}$ = 27 and 28 mag), while the deepest image with better surface-brightness sensitivity ($\mu^{AB}_{U}$$\lesssim$ 32 mag arcsec$^{-2}$) show a more gradual drop (10% between $U_{AB}$ $\simeq$ 27 and 28 mag). For the brightest galaxies within the GOODS-N field, structure and clumpy features within the galaxies are more prominent in the optimal-resolution image compared to the deeper mosaics. Finally, we find - for 220 brighter galaxies with $U_{AB}$$\lesssim$ 24 mag - only marginal differences in total flux between the optimal-resolution and lower-resolution light-profiles to $\mu^{AB}_{U}$$\lesssim$ 32 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. In only 10% of the cases are the total-flux differences larger than 0.5 mag. This helps constrain how much flux can be missed from galaxy outskirts, which is important for studies of the Extragalactic Background Light.
  • We present the results of ALMA spectroscopic follow-up of a $z=6.765$ Lyman-$\alpha$ emitting galaxy behind the cluster RXJ1347-1145. We report the detection of [CII]158$\mu$m line fully consistent with the Lyman-$\alpha$ redshift and with the peak of the optical emission. Given the magnification of $\mu=5.0 \pm 0.3$ the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) luminosity of the [CII] line is $L_{[CII]} =1.4^{+0.2}_{-0.3} \times 10^7L_{\odot}$, which is ${\sim}5$ times fainter than other detections of $z\sim 7$ galaxies. The result indicates that low $L_{[CII]}$ in $z\sim 7$ galaxies compared to the local counterparts might be caused by their low metallicities and/or feedback. The small velocity off-set ($\Delta v = 20_{-40}^{+140} \rm km/s$) between the Lyman-$\alpha$ and [CII] line is unusual, and may be indicative of ionizing photons escaping.
  • SURFSUP is a joint Spitzer and HST Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z >~ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z >~ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hours of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ~30 hours exposure time in both 3.6$\mu$m and 4.5$\mu$m in the central 4 arcmin x 4 arcmin field and ~15 hours in the flanking fields. This results in 3-$\sigma$ sensitivity limits of ~26.6 and ~26.2AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5$\mu$m bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z >~ 7 sources (using a z=9.5 galaxy behind MACSJ1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical PSF models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.
  • We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from eleven participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broad-band multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter, the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.
  • In the absence of spectra, fitting template model spectra to observed photometric fluxes, known as Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) fitting, has become the workhorse for identifying high-z galaxies. In this paper, we present an analysis of the most recent and possibly most distant galaxies discovered in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using a more robust method of redshift estimation based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting (MCMC), rather than relying on the redshift of "best fit" models obtained using common chi^2 minimization techniques. The advantage of MCMC fitting is the ability to accurately estimate the probability density function of the redshift, as well as any other input model parameters, allowing us to derive accurate credible intervals by properly marginalizing over all other input model parameters. We apply our method to 13 recently identified sources and show that, despite claims based on chi^2 minimization, none of these sources can be securely ruled out as low redshift interlopers given the low signal-to-noise of currently available observations. We estimate that there is an average probability of 21% that these sources are low redshift interlopers.
  • Using about 450,000 galaxies in the Deep Lens Survey, we present a detection of the gravitational magnification of z > 4 Lyman Break Galaxies by massive foreground galaxies with 0.4 < z < 1.0, grouped by redshift. The magnification signal is detected at S/N greater than 20, and rigorous checks confirm that it is not contaminated by any galaxy sample overlap in redshift. The inferred galaxy mass profiles are consistent with earlier lensing analyses at lower redshift. We then explore the tomographic lens magnification signal by splitting our foreground galaxy sample into 7 redshift bins. Combining galaxy-magnification cross-correlations and galaxy angular auto-correlations, we develop a bias-independent estimator of the tomographic signal. As a diagnostic of magnification tomography, the measurement of this estimator rejects a flat dark matter dominated Universe at > 7.5{\sigma} with a fixed \sigma_8 and is found to be consistent with the expected redshift-dependence of the WMAP7 {\Lambda}CDM cosmology.
  • We present a large sample of candidate galaxies at z~7--10, selected in the HUDF using the new observations made by the HST/WFC3. Our sample is composed of 20 z-dropouts, 15 Y-dropouts, and 20 J-dropouts. The surface densities of the z-dropouts are close to what predicted by earlier studies, however, those of the Y- and J-dropouts are quite unexpected. While no Y- or J-dropouts have been found at AB < 28.0 mag, their surface densities seem to increase sharply at fainter levels. While some of these candidates seem to be close to foreground galaxies and thus could possibly be gravitationally lensed, the overall surface densities after excluding such cases are still much higher than what would be expected if the luminosity function does not evolve from z~7 to 10. Motivated by such steep increases, we tentatively propose a set of Schechter function parameters to describe the LFs at z~8 and 10. As compared to their counterpart at z~7, here L* decreases by ~ 6.5x and Phi* increases by 17--90x. Although such parameters are not yet demanded by the existing observations, they are allowed and seem to agree with the data better than other alternatives. If these LFs are still valid beyond our current detection limit, this would imply a sudden emergence of a large number of low-luminosity galaxies when looking back in time to z~10, which, while seemingly exotic, would naturally fit in the picture of the cosmic hydrogen reionization. These early galaxies could easily account for the ionizing photon budget required by the reionization, and they would imply that the global star formation rate density might start from a very high value at z~10, rapidly reach the minimum at z~7, and start to rise again towards z~6. In this scenario, the majority of the stellar mass that the universe assembled through the reionization epoch seems still undetected by current observations at z~6. [Abridged]