• We present photometry, spectroscopy, and host-galaxy integral-field spectroscopy of the Type II supernova (SN) 2016esw in CGCG~229-009 from the first day after the explosion up to 120 days. Its light-curve shape is similar to that of a typical SN II; however, SN 2016esw is near the high-luminosity end of the SN II distribution, with a peak of $M^{\rm max}_{V}=-18.36$ mag. The $V$-band light curve exhibits a long recombination phase for a SN II (similar to the long-lived plateau of SN 2004et). Considering the well-known relation between the luminosity and the plateau decline rate, SN 2016esw should have a $V$-band slope of $\sim 2.10$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$; however, SN 2016esw has a substantially flatter plateau with a slope of $1.01\pm 0.26$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$, perhaps indicating that interacting Type II supernovae are not useful for cosmology. At 19.5 days post-explosion, the spectrum presents a boxy H$\alpha$ emission line with flat absorption profiles, suggesting interaction between the ejecta and circumstellar matter. Finally, based on the spectral properties, SN 2016esw shows similarities with the luminous and interacting SN 2007pk at early epochs, particularly in terms of observable line features and their evolution.
  • Double detonations in double white dwarf (WD) binaries undergoing unstable mass transfer have emerged in recent years as one of the most promising Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor scenarios. One potential outcome of this "dynamically driven double-degenerate double-detonation" (D^6) scenario is that the companion WD survives the explosion and is flung away with a velocity equal to its > 1000 km/s pre-SN orbital velocity. We perform a search for these hypervelocity runaway WDs using Gaia's second data release. In this paper, we discuss seven candidates followed up with ground-based instruments. Three sources are likely to be some of the fastest known stars in the Milky Way and are consistent with having previously been companion WDs in pre-SN Ia systems. The combined five-parameter astrometric solutions from Gaia and radial velocities from follow-up spectra yield tentative 6D confirmation of the D^6 scenario. The past position of one of these stars is also coincident with the center of a faint, old SN remnant, further strengthening the interpretation of these candidates as hypervelocity runaways from binary systems that underwent SNe Ia.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope observations and photometric measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2013aa 1500 days after explosion. At this epoch, the luminosity is primarily dictated by the amounts of radioactive ${}^{57}\textrm{Co}$ and ${}^{55}\textrm{Fe}$, while at earlier epochs, the luminosity depends on the amount of radioactive ${}^{56}\textrm{Co}$. The ratio of odd-numbered to even-numbered isotopes depends significantly on the density of the progenitor white dwarf during the SN explosion, which, in turn, depends on the details of the progenitor system at the time of ignition. From a comprehensive analysis of the entire light curve of SN 2013aa, we measure a $M({}^{57}\textrm{Co})/M({}^{56}\textrm{Co})$ ratio of $0.02^{+0.01}_{-0.02}$, which indicates a relatively low central density for the progenitor white dwarf at the time of explosion, consistent with double-degenerate progenitor channels. We estimate $M({}^{56}\textrm{Ni}) = 0.732 \pm 0.151\:\mathrm{M_{\odot}}$, and place an upper limit on the abundance of ${}^{55}\textrm{Fe}$. A recent study reported a possible correlation between $M({}^{57}\textrm{Co})/M({}^{56}\textrm{Co})$ and stretch for four SNe Ia. SN 2013aa, however, does not fit this trend, indicating either SN 2013aa is an extreme outlier or the correlation does not hold up with a larger sample. The $M({}^{57}\textrm{Co})/M({}^{56}\textrm{Co})$ measured for the expanded sample of SNe Ia with photometry at extremely late times has a much larger range than that of explosion models, perhaps limiting conclusions about SN Ia progenitors drawn from extremely late-time photometry.
  • Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • The Foundation Supernova Survey aims to provide a large, high-fidelity, homogeneous, and precisely-calibrated low-redshift Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) sample for cosmology. The calibration of the current low-redshift SN sample is the largest component of systematic uncertainties for SN cosmology, and new data are necessary to make progress. We present the motivation, survey design, observation strategy, implementation, and first results for the Foundation Supernova Survey. We are using the Pan-STARRS telescope to obtain photometry for up to 800 SNe Ia at z < 0.1. This strategy has several unique advantages: (1) the Pan-STARRS system is a superbly calibrated telescopic system, (2) Pan-STARRS has observed 3/4 of the sky in grizy making future template observations unnecessary, (3) we have a well-tested data-reduction pipeline, and (4) we have observed ~3000 high-redshift SNe Ia on this system. Here we present our initial sample of 225 SN Ia griz light curves, of which 180 pass all criteria for inclusion in a cosmological sample. The Foundation Supernova Survey already contains more cosmologically useful SNe Ia than all other published low-redshift SN Ia samples combined. We expect that the systematic uncertainties for the Foundation Supernova Sample will be 2-3 times smaller than other low-redshift samples. We find that our cosmologically useful sample has an intrinsic scatter of 0.111 mag, smaller than other low-redshift samples. We perform detailed simulations showing that simply replacing the current low-redshift SN Ia sample with an equally sized Foundation sample will improve the precision on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter by 35%, and the dark energy figure-of-merit by 72%.
  • 11 hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient SSS17a was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993. While the gravitational wave data indicate GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints of the nature of that system. Here we synthesize all optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration. We find that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We find that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result.
  • The merging neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to $\gamma$-rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available $\gamma$-ray, X-ray and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized $r$-process material. The simplest hypothesis that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short $\gamma$-ray burst (sGRB) seems to agree with the present data. While low luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.
  • We discovered Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) in the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) localization volume of GW170817, the first detected binary neutron star (BNS) merger, only 10.9 hours after the trigger. No object was present at the location of SSS17a only a few days earlier, providing a qualitative spatial and temporal association with GW170817. Here we quantify this association, finding that SSS17a is almost certainly the counterpart of GW170817, with the chance of a coincidence being < 9 x 10^-6 (90% confidence). We arrive at this conclusion by comparing the optical properties of SSS17a to other known astrophysical transients, finding that SSS17a fades and cools faster than any other observed transient. For instance, SSS17a fades >5 mag in g within 7 days of our first data point while all other known transients of similar luminosity fade by <1 mag during the same time period. Its spectra are also unique, being mostly featureless, even as it cools. The rarity of "SSS17a-like" transients combined with the relatively small LVC localization volume and recent non-detection imply the extremely unlikely chance coincidence. We find that the volumetric rate of SSS17a-like transients is < 1.6 x 10^4 Gpc^-3 year^-1 and the Milky Way rate is <0.19 per century. A transient survey designed to discover similar events should be high cadence and observe in red filters. The LVC will likely detect substantially more BNS mergers than current optical surveys will independently discover SSS17a-like transients, however a 1-day cadence survey with LSST could discover an order of magnitude more events.
  • We present multi-epoch, multi-colour pre-outburst photometry and post-outburst light curves and spectra of the luminous blue variable (LBV) outburst Gaia16cfr discovered by the Gaia satellite on 1 December 2016. We detect Gaia16cfr in 13 epochs of Hubble Space Telescope imaging spanning phases of 10 yr to 8 months before the outburst and in Spitzer Space Telescope imaging 13 years before outburst. Pre-outburst optical photometry is consistent with an 18 Msun F8 I star, although the star was likely reddened and closer to 30 Msun. The pre-outburst source exhibited a significant near-infrared excess consistent with a 120 AU shell with 4x10-6 Msun of dust. We infer that the source was enshrouded by an optically-thick and compact shell of circumstellar material from an LBV wind, which formed a pseudo-photosphere consistent with S Dor-like variables in their "maximum" phase. Within a year of outburst, the source was highly variable on 10-30 day timescales. The outburst light curve closely matches that of the 2012 outburst of SN 2009ip, although the observed velocities are significantly slower than in that event. In Halpha, the outburst had an excess of blueshifted emission at late times centred around -1500 km/s, similar to that of double-peaked Type IIn supernovae and the LBV outburst SN 2015bh. From the pre-outburst and post-outburst photometry, we infer that the outburst ejecta are evolving into a dense, highly structured circumstellar environment from precursor outbursts within years of the December 2016 event.
  • We present the results of an extensive observational campaign on the nearby Type Ibn SN 2015G, including data from radio through ultraviolet wavelengths. SN 2015G was asymmetric, showing late-time nebular lines redshifted by ~1000 km/s. It shared many features with the prototypical SN In 2006jc, including extremely strong He I emssion lines and a late-time blue pseudocontinuum. The young SN 2015G showed narrow P-Cygni profiles of He I, but never in its evolution did it show any signature of hydrogen - arguing for a dense, ionized, and hydrogen-free circumstellar medium moving outward with a velocity of ~1000 km/s and created by relatively recent mass loss from the progenitor star. Ultraviolet through infrared observations show that the fading SN 2015G (which was probably discovered some 20 days post-peak) had a spectral energy distribution that was well described by a simple, single-component blackbody. Archival HST images provide upper limits on the luminosity of SN 2015G's progenitor, while nondetections of any luminous radio afterglow and optical nondetections of outbursts over the past two decades provide constraints upon its mass-loss history.
  • We study the properties of tidal disruption event (TDE) host galaxies in the context of a catalog of ~500,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We explore whether selection effects can account for the overrepresentation of TDEs in E+A/post-starburst galaxies by creating matched galaxy samples. Accounting for possible selection effects due to black hole (BH) mass, redshift completeness, strong AGN presence, bulge colors, and surface brightness can reduce the apparent overrepresentation of TDEs in E+A host galaxies by a factor of ~4 (from ~100-190 to ~25-48), but cannot fully explain the preference. We find that TDE host galaxies have atypical photometric properties compared to similar, "typical" galaxies. In particular, TDE host galaxies tend to live in or near the "green valley" between star-forming and passive galaxies, and have bluer bulge colors ($\Delta (g-r)$ ~ 0.3 mag), lower half-light surface brightnesses (by ~1 mag/sq."), higher Sersic indices ($\Delta n_g$ ~ 3), and higher bulge-to-total-light ratios ($\Delta B/T$ ~ 0.5) than galaxies with matched BH masses. We find that TDE host galaxies appear more centrally concentrated, and that all have high galaxy Sersic indices and B/T fractions---on average in the top 10% of galaxies of the same BH mass---, suggesting a higher nuclear stellar density. We identify a region in Sersic index and BH mass parameter space that contains ~2% of our reference catalog galaxies but >60% of TDE host galaxies. In summary, TDE host galaxies appear to reside in or near the green valley, and to be more centrally concentrated, with brighter and bluer cores, than typical galaxies of the same BH mass. These photometric properties may be particularly useful for selecting candidate TDEs for spectroscopic follow-up observations in large transient surveys. [abbreviated]
  • Conventional Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology analyses currently use a simplistic linear regression of magnitude versus color and light curve shape, which does not model intrinsic SN Ia variations and host galaxy dust as physically distinct effects, resulting in low color-magnitude slopes. We construct a probabilistic generative model for the dusty distribution of extinguished absolute magnitudes and apparent colors as the convolution of a intrinsic SN Ia color-magnitude distribution and a host galaxy dust reddening-extinction distribution. If the intrinsic color-magnitude ($M_B$ vs. $B-V$) slope $\beta_{int}$ differs from the host galaxy dust law $R_B$, this convolution results in a specific curve of mean extinguished absolute magnitude vs. apparent color. The derivative of this curve smoothly transitions from $\beta_{int}$ in the blue tail to $R_B$ in the red tail of the apparent color distribution. The conventional linear fit approximates this effective curve near the average apparent color, resulting in an apparent slope $\beta_{app}$ between $\beta_{int}$ and $R_B$. We incorporate these effects into a hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for SN Ia light curve measurements, and analyze a dataset of SALT2 optical light curve fits of 248 nearby SN Ia at z < 0.10. The conventional linear fit obtains $\beta_{app} \approx 3$. Our model finds a $\beta_{int} = 2.3 \pm 0.3$ and a distinct dust law of $R_B = 3.8 \pm 0.3$, consistent with the average for Milky Way dust, while correcting a systematic distance bias of $\sim 0.10$ mag in the tails of the apparent color distribution. Finally, we extend our model to examine the SN Ia luminosity-host mass dependence in terms of intrinsic and dust components.
  • We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volume-limited sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, however, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volume-limited sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify SN 2005io as SN 1987A-like here for the first time), and peculiar subtypes. The relative fractions of Type Ia SNe, Type II SNe, and stripped-envelope SNe in the local universe are not affected, but those of some subtypes are. Most significantly, after discussing the often unclear boundary between SNe Ib and Ic when only noisy spectra are available, we find a higher SN Ib fraction and a lower SN Ic fraction than calculated by Li et al. (2011b): spectroscopically normal SNe Ib occur in the local universe $1.7 \pm 0.9$ times more often than do normal SNe Ic.
  • Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 < t < 1229 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.016), hydrogen-rich Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP). Our newly constructed sample contains 91 nebular spectra of 38 SNe IIP, which is the largest dataset of its kind ever analysed in one study, and many of the objects have complementary photometric data. We determined the peak and total luminosity, velocity of the peak, HWHM intensity, and profile shape for many emission lines. Temporal evolution of these values and various flux ratios are studied. We also investigate the correlations between these measurements and photometric observables, such as the peak and plateau absolute magnitudes and the late-time light curve decline rates in various optical bands. The strongest and most robust result we find is that the luminosities of all spectral features (except those of helium) tend to be higher in objects with steeper late-time V-band decline rates. A steep late-time V-band slope likely arises from less efficient trapping of gamma-rays and positrons, which could be caused by multidimensional effects such as clumping of the ejecta or asphericity of the explosion itself. Furthermore, if gamma-rays and positrons can escape more easily, then so can photons via the observed emission lines, leading to more luminous spectral features. It is also shown that SNe IIP with larger progenitor stars have ejecta with a more physically extended oxygen layer that is well-mixed with the hydrogen layer. In addition, we find a subset of objects with evidence for asymmetric Ni-56 ejection, likely bipolar in shape. We also compare our observations to theoretical late-time spectral models of SNe IIP from two separate groups and find moderate-to-good agreement with both sets of models. Our SNe IIP spectra are consistent with models of 12-15 M_Sun progenitor stars having relatively low metallicity (Z $\le$ 0.01).
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • We present a detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a point source consistent with being the progenitor star of the Type IIb supernova (SN IIb) 2016gkg. Post-explosion imaging from the Keck Adaptive Optics system was used to perform relative astrometry between the Keck and HST imaging. We identify a single point source in the HST images coincident with the SN position to 0.89-sigma. The HST photometry is consistent with the progenitor star being an A0Ia star with T=9500 K and log (L/Lsun)=5.15. We find that the SN 2016gkg progenitor star appears more consistent with binary than single-star evolutionary models. In addition, early-time light curve data from SN 2016gkg revealed a rapid rise in luminosity within ~0.4 days of non-detection limits, consistent with models of the cooling phase after shock break-out. We use these data to determine an explosion date of 20.15 September 2016 and progenitor star radius of log (R/Rsun)=2.41, which agrees with photometry from the progenitor star. Our findings are also consistent with detections of other SNe IIb progenitor stars, although more luminous and bluer than most other examples.
  • We present results of an optical search for Cepheid variable stars using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 19 hosts of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the maser-host galaxy NGC 4258, conducted as part of the SH0ES project (Supernovae and H0 for the Equation of State of dark energy). The targets include 9 newly imaged SN Ia hosts using a novel strategy based on a long-pass filter that minimizes the number of HST orbits required to detect and accurately determine Cepheid properties. We carried out a homogeneous reduction and analysis of all observations, including new universal variability searches in all SN Ia hosts, that yielded a total of 2200 variables with well-defined selection criteria -- the largest such sample identified outside the Local Group. These objects are used in a companion paper to determine the local value of H0 with a total uncertainty of 2.4%.
  • We present optical spectra of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe at 100, 205, 311, 349, and 578 days post-maximum light, as well as an ultraviolet spectrum obtained with Hubble Space Telescope at 360 days post-maximum light. We compare these observations with synthetic spectra produced with the radiative transfer code PHOENIX. The day +100 spectrum can be well fit with models which neglect collisional and radiative data for forbidden lines. Curiously, including this data and recomputing the fit yields a quite similar spectrum, but with different combinations of lines forming some of the stronger features. At day +205 and later epochs, forbidden lines dominate much of the optical spectrum formation; however, our results indicate that recombination, not collisional excitation, is the most influential physical process driving spectrum formation at these late times. Consequently, our synthetic optical and UV spectra at all epochs presented here are formed almost exclusively through recombination-driven fluorescence. Furthermore, our models suggest that the ultraviolet spectrum even as late as day +360 is optically thick and consists of permitted lines from several iron-peak species. These results indicate that the transition to the "nebular" phase in Type Ia supernovae is complex and highly wavelength-dependent.
  • Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.
  • Supernova (SN) iPTF13bvn in NGC 5806 was the first Type Ib SN to have been tentatively associated with a progenitor candidate in pre-explosion images. We performed deep ultraviolet (UV) and optical Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the SN site 740 days after explosion. We detect an object in the optical bands that is fainter than the pre-explosion object. This dimming is likely not produced by dust absorption in the ejecta; thus, our finding confirms the connection of the progenitor candidate with the SN. The object in our data is likely dominated by the fading SN, which implies that the pre-SN flux is mostly due to the progenitor. We compare our revised pre-SN photometry with previously proposed progenitor models. Although binary progenitors are favored, models need to be refined. In particular, to comply with our deep UV detection limit, any companion star must be less luminous than a late-O star or substantially obscured by newly formed dust. A definitive progenitor characterization will require further observations to disentangle the contribution of a much fainter SN and its environment.
  • We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to reduce the uncertainty in the local value of the Hubble constant (H_0) from 3.3% to 2.4%. Improvements come from new, near-infrared observations of Cepheid variables in 11 new hosts of recent SNe~Ia, more than doubling the sample of SNe~Ia having a Cepheid-calibrated distance for a total of 19; these leverage the magnitude-z relation based on 300 SNe~Ia at z<0.15. All 19 hosts and the megamaser system NGC4258 were observed with WFC3, thus nullifying cross-instrument zeropoint errors. Other improvements include a 33% reduction in the systematic uncertainty in the maser distance to NGC4258, more Cepheids and a more robust distance to the LMC from late-type DEBs, HST observations of Cepheids in M31, and new HST-based trigonometric parallaxes for Milky Way (MW) Cepheids. We consider four geometric distance calibrations of Cepheids: (i) megamasers in NGC4258, (ii) 8 DEBs in the LMC, (iii) 15 MW Cepheids with parallaxes, and (iv) 2 DEBs in M31. H_0 from each is 72.25+/-2.51, 72.04+/-2.67, 76.18+/-2.37, and 74.50+/-3.27 km/sec/Mpc, respectively. Our best estimate of 73.24+/-1.74 km/sec/Mpc combines the anchors NGC4258, MW, and LMC, and includes systematic errors for a final uncertainty of 2.4%. This value is 3.4 sigma higher than 66.93+/-0.62 km/sec/Mpc predicted by LambdaCDM with 3 neutrinos with mass 0.06 eV and the Planck data, but reduces to 2.1 sigma relative to the prediction of 69.3+/-0.7 km/sec/Mpc with the combination of WMAP+ACT+SPT+BAO, suggesting systematic uncertainties in CMB measurements may play a role in the tension. If we take the conflict between Planck and H_0 at face value, one plausible explanation could involve an additional source of dark radiation in the early Universe in the range of Delta N_eff=0.4-1. We anticipate significant improvements in H_0 from upcoming parallax measurements.
  • Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) probe the outermost layers of the explosion, and UV spectra of SNe Ia are expected to be extremely sensitive to differences in progenitor composition and the details of the explosion. Here we present the first study of a sample of high signal-to-noise ratio SN Ia spectra that extend blueward of 2900 A. We focus on spectra taken within 5 days of maximum brightness. Our sample of ten SNe Ia spans the majority of the parameter space of SN Ia optical diversity. We find that SNe Ia have significantly more diversity in the UV than in the optical, with the spectral variance continuing to increase with decreasing wavelengths until at least 1800 A (the limit of our data). The majority of the UV variance correlates with optical light-curve shape, while there are no obvious and unique correlations between spectral shape and either ejecta velocity or host-galaxy morphology. Using light-curve shape as the primary variable, we create a UV spectral model for SNe Ia at peak brightness. With the model, we can examine how individual SNe vary relative to expectations based on only their light-curve shape. Doing this, we confirm an excess of flux for SN 2011fe at short wavelengths, consistent with its progenitor having a subsolar metallicity. While most other SNe Ia do not show large deviations from the model, ASASSN-14lp has a deficit of flux at short wavelengths, suggesting that its progenitor was relatively metal rich.
  • The ESSENCE survey discovered 213 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.81 between 2002 and 2008. We present their R and I-band photometry, measured from images obtained using the MOSAIC II camera at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope, along with rapid-response spectroscopy for each object. We use our spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine an accurate, quantitative classification and a precise redshift. Through an extensive calibration program we have improved the precision of the CTIO Blanco natural photometric system. We use several empirical metrics to measure our internal photometric consistency and our absolute calibration of the survey. We assess the effect of various potential sources of systematic bias on our measured fluxes, and we estimate that the dominant term in the systematic error budget from the photometric calibration on our absolute fluxes is ~1%.
  • We report evidence for excess blue light from the Type Ia supernova SN 2012cg at fifteen and sixteen days before maximum B-band brightness. The emission is consistent with predictions for the impact of the supernova on a non-degenerate binary companion. This is the first evidence for emission from a companion to a SN Ia. Sixteen days before maximum light, the B-V color of SN 2012cg is 0.2 mag bluer than for other normal SN~Ia. At later times, this supernova has a typical SN Ia light curve, with extinction-corrected M_B = -19.62 +/- 0.02 mag and Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.86 +/- 0.02. Our data set is extensive, with photometry in 7 filters from 5 independent sources. Early spectra also show the effects of blue light, and high-velocity features are observed at early times. Near maximum, the spectra are normal with a silicon velocity v_{Si} = -10,500$ km s^{-1}. Comparing the early data with models by Kasen (2010) favors a main-sequence companion of about 6 solar masses. It is possible that many other SN Ia have main-sequence companions that have eluded detection because the emission from the impact is fleeting and faint.
  • We examine the late-time (t > 200 days after peak brightness) spectra of Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax), a low-luminosity, low-energy class of thermonuclear stellar explosions observationally similar to, but distinct from, Type Ia supernovae. We present new spectra of SN 2014dt, resulting in the most complete published late-time spectral sequence of a SN Iax. At late times, SNe Iax have generally similar spectra, all with a similar continuum shape and strong forbidden-line emission. However, there is also significant diversity where some late-time SN Iax spectra display narrow P-Cygni features and a continuum indicative of a photosphere in addition to strong narrow forbidden lines, while others have no obvious P-Cygni features, strong broad forbidden lines, and weak narrow forbidden lines. Finally, some SNe Iax have spectra intermediate to these two varieties with weak P-Cygni features and broad/narrow forbidden lines of similar strength. We find that SNe Iax with strong broad forbidden lines also tend to be more luminous and have higher-velocity ejecta at peak brightness. We estimate blackbody and kinematic radii of the late-time photosphere, finding the latter an order of magnitude larger than the former. We propose a two-component model that solves this discrepancy and explains the diversity of the late-time spectra of SNe Iax. In this model, the broad forbidden lines originate from the SN ejecta, while the photosphere, P-Cygni lines, and narrow forbidden lines originate from a wind launched from the remnant of the progenitor white dwarf and is driven by the radioactive decay of newly synthesized material left in the remnant. The relative strength of the two components accounts for the diversity of late-time SN Iax spectra. This model also solves the puzzle of a long-lived photosphere and slow late-time decline of SNe Iax. (Abridged)