• We perform a comprehensive analysis of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC6781 to investigate the physical conditions of each of its ionized, atomic, and molecular gas and dust components and the object's evolution, based on panchromatic observational data ranging from UV to radio. Empirical nebular elemental abundances, compared with theoretical predictions via nucleosynthesis models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, indicate that the progenitor is a solar-metallicity, 2.25-3.0 Msun initial-mass star. We derive the best-fit distance of 0.46 kpc by fitting the stellar luminosity (as a function of the distance and effective temperature of the central star) with the adopted post-AGB evolutionary tracks. Our excitation energy diagram analysis indicate high excitation temperatures in the photodissociation region (PDR) beyond the ionized part of the nebula, suggesting extra heating by shock interactions between the slow AGB wind and the fast PN wind. Through iterative fitting using the Cloudy code with empirically-derived constraints, we find the best-fit dusty photoionization model of the object that would inclusively reproduce all of the adopted panchromatic observational data. The estimated total gas mass (0.41 Msun) corresponds to the mass ejected during the last AGB thermal pulse event predicted for a 2.5 Msun initial-mass star. A significant fraction of the total mass (about 70 percent) is found to exist in the PDR, demonstrating the critical importance of the PDR in PNe that are generally recognized as the hallmark of ionized/H+ regions.
  • We present the results of our search for low- and intermediate mass evolved stars in the outer Galaxy using AllWISE catalogue photometry. We show that the [3.4]-[12] versus [4.6]-[22] colour-colour diagram is most suitable for separating C-rich/O-rich AGB and post- AGB star candidates. We are able to select 2,510 AGB and 24,821 post-AGB star candidates. However, the latter are severely mixed with the known young stellar objects in this diagram.
  • We investigate the distribution of different classes of spectroscopically identified sources and theoretical models in the color-color diagrams (CCDs) combining the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) data to develop a method to classify Outer Galaxy sources detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope (hereafter Spitzer) SMOG survey in the IRAC 3.6 and 8.0 micrometer and MIPS 24 micrometer bands. We supplement the Spitzer data with the data from other satellite and ground-based surveys. The main goal of our study is to discover and characterize the population of intermediate- and low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Outer Galaxy and use it to study star formation in a significantly different environment than the Galaxy inside the solar circle. Since the YSOs can be confused with evolved stars in the MIR, these classes of objects need to be carefully separated. Here we present the initial results of our analysis using the Ks-[8.0] vs. Ks-[24] CCD as an example. The evolved stars separated from YSOs in the YSO selection process will be investigated in detail in the follow-up study.
  • We have investigated the light variability in a sample of 22 carbon-rich post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based primarily on photometric data from the OGLE survey. All are found to vary. Dominant periods are found in eight of them; these periods range from 49 to 157 days, and most of these stars have F spectral types. These eight are found to be similar to the Milky Way Galaxy (MWG) carbon-rich proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs) in several ways: (a) they are in the same period range of ~38 to ~160 days, (b) they have similar spectral types, (c) they are (all but one) redder when fainter, (d) they have multiple periods, closely spaced in time, with a average ratio of secondary to primary period of ~1.0, and as an ensemble, (e) they show a trend of decreasing period with increasing temperature, and (f) they show a trend of decreasing amplitude with decreasing period. However, they possibly differ in that the decreasing trend of period with temperature may be slightly offset from that of the MWG. These eight are classified as PPNs. The other 14 all show evidence of variability on shorter timescales. They are likely hotter PPNs or young planetary nebulae. However, in the MWG the numbers of PPNs peak in the F-G spectral types, while it appears that in the LMC they peak at a hotter B spectral type. One of the periodic ones shows a small, R Coronae Borealis-type light curve drop.
  • We present the results of observations of blazar PKS 1510-089 with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, together with multiwavelength data from Fermi/LAT, Swift, SMARTS and SMA. The source was found in a quiet state, and its far-infrared spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a spectral index of alpha ~ 0.7. Our Herschel observations were preceded by two 'orphan' gamma-ray flares. The near-infrared data reveal the high-energy cut-off in the main synchrotron component, which cannot be associated with the main gamma-ray component in a one-zone leptonic model. This is because in such a model the luminosity ratio of the External-Compton and synchrotron components is tightly related to the frequency ratio of these components, and in this particular case an unrealistically high energy density of the external radiation would be implied. Therefore, we consider a well-constrained two-zone blazar model to interpret the entire dataset. In this framework, the observed infrared emission is associated with the synchrotron component produced in the hot-dust region at the supra-pc scale, while the gamma-ray emission is associated with the External-Compton component produced in the broad-line region at the sub-pc scale. In addition, the optical/UV emission is associated with the accretion disk thermal emission, with the accretion disk corona likely contributing to the X-ray emission.
  • We construct a detailed model for the IR dust emission from the PN IC 418. We succeed to reproduce the emission from 2 to 200$\mu$m. We can determine the amount of emitting dust as well as its composition, and compare to the depletion of elements determined for the photoionized region.
  • Post-AGB stars are key objects for the study of the dramatic morphological changes of low- to intermediate-mass stars on their evolution from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) towards the Planetary Nebula stage. There is growing evidences that binary interaction processes may very well have a determining role in the shaping process of many objects, but so far direct evidence is still weak. We aim at a systematic study of the dust distribution around a large sample of Post-AGB stars as a probe of the symmetry breaking in the nebulae around these systems. We used imaging in the mid-infrared to study the inner part of these evolved stars to probe direct emission from dusty structures in the core of Post-AGB stars in order to better understand their shaping mechanisms. We imaged a sample of 93 evolved stars and nebulae in the mid-infrared using VISIR/VLT, T-Recs/Gemini South and Michelle/Gemini North. We found that all the the Proto-Planetary Nebulae we resolved show a clear departure from spherical symmetry. 59 out of the 93 observed targets appear to be non resolved. The resolved targets can be divided in two categories. The nebulae with a dense central core, that are either bipolar and multipolar. The nebulae with no central core have an elliptical morphology.The dense central torus observed likely host binary systems which triggered fast outflows that shaped the nebulae.
  • A sample of 27 sources, catalogued as pre-main sequence stars by the Pico dos Dias Survey (PDS), is analyzed to investigate a possible contamination by post-AGB stars. The far-infrared excess, due to dust present in the circumstellar envelope, is typical for both categories: young stars and objects that have already left the main sequence and are suffering a severe mass-loss. The presence of two known post-AGB stars in our sample inspired us to seek for other very likely or possible post-AGB objects among PDS sources previously suggested to be Herbig Ae/Be stars, by revisiting the observational database of this sample. In a comparative study with well known post-AGBs, several characteristics were evaluated: (i) parameters related to the circumstellar emission; (ii) spatial distribution to verify the background contribution from dark clouds; (iii) spectral features, and (iv) optical and infrared colors. These characteristics suggest that 7 objects of the studied sample are very likely post-AGBs, 5 are possible post-AGBs, 8 are unlikely post-AGBs, and the nature of 7 objects remains unclear.
  • Obscured by their circumstellar dusty envelopes post-AGB stars emit a large fraction of their energy in the infrared and thus, infrared sky surveys like IRAS were essential for discoveries of post-AGBs in the past. Now, with the AKARI infrared sky survey we can extend our knowledge about the late stages of stellar evolution. The long-term goal of our work is to define new photometric criteria to distinguish new post-AGB candidates from the AKARI data.
  • We present the results of our preliminary study of all known Galactic PNe (included in the Kerber 2003 catalog) which are detected by the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey as identified in the AKARI/FIS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) Version Beta-1.
  • The silicate carbon star V778 Cyg is a source of 22 GHz water maser emission which was recently resolved by MERLIN. Observations revealed an elongated S-like structure along which the velocities of the maser features show a linear dependence on the impact parameter. This is consistent with a doubly-warped m=2 disc observed edge-on. Water masers and silicate dust emission (detected by IRAS and ISO) have a common origin in O-rich material and are likely to be co-located in the disc. We propose a detailed self-consistent model of a masing gas-dust disc around a companion to the carbon star in a binary system, which allows us to estimate the companion mass of 1.7 +- 0.1 M_sun, the disc radius of 40 +-3 AU and the distance between companions of about 80 AU. Using a dust-gas coupling model for water masing, we calculate the maser power self-consistently, accounting for both the gas and the dust energy balances. Comparing the simulation results with the observational data, we deduce the main physical parameters of the masing disc, such as the gas and dust temperatures and their densities. We also present an analysis of the stability of the disc.
  • We consider effects of the MHD turbulence on the viscosity during the evolution of the thermal-viscous ionization instability in the standard $\alpha$-accretion disks. We consider the possibility that the accretion onto a supermassive black hole proceeds through an outer standard accretion disk and inner, radiatively inefficient and advection dominated flow. In this scenario we follow the time evolution of the accretion disk in which the viscosity parameter $\alpha$ is constant throughout the whole instability cycle, as implied by the strength of MHD turbulence. We conclude that the hydrogen ionization instability is a promising mechanism to explain the intermittent activity in AGN.
  • We have analyzed the effects of photoelectric heating by dust grains in photoionization models of planetary nebulae. We have shown that this process is particularly important if planetary nebulae contain a population of small grains. The presence of such grains would solve a number of problems that have found no satisfactory solution so far: i) the thermal energy deficit in some objects inferred from tailored photoionization modelling; ii) the large negative temperature gradients inferred directly from spatially resolved observations and indirectly from integrated spectra in some planetary nebulae; iii) the fact that the temperatures derived from the Balmer jump are smaller than those derived from [O III] 4363/5007; iv) the fact that the observed intensities of [O I] 6300 are often larger than predicted by photoionization models. In presence of moderate density inhomogeneities, such as inferred from high resolution images of planetary nebulae, photoelectric heating would boost the temperature of the tenuous component, which would then better confine the clumps. The temperature structure of such dusty and filamentary nebulae would solve the long standing problem of temperature fluctuations posed by Peimbert (1967, ApJ, 150, 825).