• The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be conducting a nearly all-sky photometric survey over two years, with a core mission goal to discover small transiting exoplanets orbiting nearby bright stars. It will obtain 30-minute cadence observations of all objects in the TESS fields of view, along with 2-minute cadence observations of 200,000 to 400,000 selected stars. The choice of which stars to observe at the 2-min cadence is driven by the need to detect small transiting planets, which leads to the selection of primarily bright, cool dwarfs. We describe the catalogs assembled and the algorithms used to populate the TESS Input Catalog (TIC). We also describe a ranking system for prioritizing stars according to the smallest transiting planet detectable, and assemble a Candidate Target List (CTL) using that ranking. We discuss additional factors that affect the ability to photometrically detect and dynamically confirm small planets, and we note additional stellar populations of interest that may be added to the final target list. The TIC is available on the STScI MAST server, and an enhanced CTL is available through the Filtergraph data visualization portal system at the URL https://filtergraph.vanderbilt.edu/tess_ctl .
  • We present a catalog of interesting targets recently identified using data from Campaign 16 of the K2 mission. Our catalog includes 32 high-quality planet candidates (showing no signs of being non- planetary in nature), 54 more ambiguous events that may be either planets or false positives, 169 eclipsing binaries, and 217 other regularly periodic variable sources. We have released light curves for all targets in C16, and have also released system parameters and transit vetting plots for all interesting candidates identified in this paper. Of particular interest is a candidate planet orbiting the bright F dwarf HD 73344 (V = 6.9, K = 5.6) with an orbital period of 15 days. If confirmed, this object would correspond to a $\sim2.6 R_{\oplus}$ planet and would likely be a favorable target for radial velocity characterization. Campaign 16 is one of just two K2 campaigns observed so far in "forward-facing" mode, which enables immediate follow-up observations from the ground. This paper is intended as a rapid release of planet candidates, eclipsing binaries and other interesting periodic variables to maximize the scientific yield of this campaign, and as a test run for the upcoming TESS mission, whose frequent data releases call for similarly rapid candidate identification and efficient follow-up.
  • We present a catalog of cool dwarf targets ($V-J>2.7$, $T_{\rm eff} \lesssim 4000 K$) and their stellar properties for the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), for the purpose of determining which cool dwarfs should be observed using two-minute observations. TESS has the opportunity to search tens of thousands of nearby, cool, late K and M-type dwarfs for transiting exoplanets, an order of magnitude more than current or previous transiting exoplanet surveys, such as {\it Kepler}, K2 and ground-based programs. This necessitates a new approach to choosing cool dwarf targets. Cool dwarfs were chosen by collating parallax and proper motion catalogs from the literature and subjecting them to a variety of selection criteria. We calculate stellar parameters and TESS magnitudes using the best possible relations from the literature while maintaining uniformity of methods for the sake of reproducibility. We estimate the expected planet yield from TESS observations using statistical results from the Kepler Mission, and use these results to choose the best targets for two-minute observations, optimizing for small planets for which masses can conceivably be measured using follow up Doppler spectroscopy by current and future Doppler spectrometers. The catalog is incorporated into the TESS Input Catalog and TESS Candidate Target List until a more complete and accurate cool dwarf catalog identified by ESA's Gaia Mission can be incorporated.
  • We present 151 planet candidates orbiting 141 stars from K2 campaigns 5-8 (C5-C8), identified through a systematic search of K2 photometry. In addition, we identify 16 targets as likely eclipsing binaries, based on their light curve morphology. We obtained follow-up optical spectra of 105/141 candidate host stars and 8/16 eclipsing binaries to improve stellar properties and to identify spectroscopic binaries. Importantly, spectroscopy enables measurements of host star radii with $\approx$10% precision, compared to $\approx$40% precision when only broadband photometry is available. The improved stellar radii enable improved planet radii. Our curated catalog of planet candidates provides a starting point for future efforts to confirm and characterize K2 discoveries.
  • The K2 mission is targeting large numbers of nearby (d<100 pc) GKM dwarfs selected from the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey (mu>40 mas yr^-1, V<20). Additionally, the mission is targeting low-mass, high proper motion stars associated with the local (d<500 pc) Galactic halo population also selected from SUPERBLINK. K2 campaigns 0 through 8 monitored a total of 27,382 of these cool main-sequence stars. We used the auto-correlation function to search for fast rotators by identifying short-period photometric modulations in the K2 light curves. We identified 508 candidate fast rotators with rotation periods <4 days that show light curve modulations consistent with star spots. Their kinematics show low average transverse velocities, suggesting they are part of the young disk population. A subset (13) of the fast rotators are found among those targets with colors and kinematics consistent with the local Galactic halo population and may represent stars spun up by tidal interactions in close binary systems. We further demonstrate the M dwarf fast rotators selected from the K2 light curves are significantly more likely to have UV excess, and discuss the potential of the K2 mission to identify new nearby young GKM dwarfs on the basis of their fast rotation rates. Finally, we discuss the possible use of local halo stars as fiducial, non-variable sources in the Kepler fields.
  • We present an activity and kinematic analysis of high proper motion white dwarf-M dwarf binaries (WD+dMs) found in the SUPERBLINK survey, 178 of which are new identifications. To identify WD+dMs, we developed a UV-optical-IR color criterion and conducted a spectroscopic survey to confirm each candidate binary. For the newly identified systems, we fit the two components using model white dwarf spectra and M dwarf template spectra to determine physical parameters. We use H$\alpha$ chromospheric emission to examine the magnetic activity of the M dwarf in each system, and investigate how its activity is affected by the presence of a white dwarf companion. We find that the fraction of WD+dM binaries with active M dwarfs is significantly higher than their single M dwarf counterparts at early and mid spectral types. We corroborate previous studies that find high activity fractions at both close and intermediate separations. At more distant separations the binary fraction appears to approach the activity fraction for single M dwarfs. Using derived radial velocities and the proper motions, we calculate 3D space velocities for the WD+dMs in SUPERBLINK. For the entire SUPERBLINK WD+dMs, we find a large vertical velocity dispersion, indicating a dynamically hotter population compared to high proper motion samples of single M dwarfs. We compare the kinematics for systems with active M dwarfs and those with inactive M dwarfs, and find signatures of asymmetric drift in the inactive sample, indicating that they are drawn from an older population.
  • We present 114 trigonometric parallaxes for 107 nearby white dwarf (WD) systems from both the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation (CTIOPI) and the U. S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) parallax programs. Of these, 76 parallaxes for 69 systems were measured by the CTIOPI program and 38 parallaxes for as many systems were measured by the NOFS program. A total of 50 systems are confirmed to be within the 25 pc horizon of interest. Coupled with a spectroscopic confirmation of a common proper motion companion to a Hipparcos star within 25 pc as well as confirmation parallax determinations for two WD systems included in the recently released Tycho Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalog, we add 53 new systems to the 25 pc WD sample $-$ a 42% increase. Our sample presented here includes four strong candidate halo systems, a new metal-rich DAZ WD, a confirmation of a recently discovered nearby short-period (P = 2.85 hr) double degenerate, a WD with a new astrometric pertubation (long period, unconstrained with our data), and a new triple system where the WD companion main-sequence star has an astrometric perturbation (P $\sim$ 1.6 yr).
  • We report precise mass and density measurements of two extremely hot sub-Neptune-size planets from the K2 mission using radial velocities, K2 photometry, and adaptive optics imaging. K2-66 harbors a close-in sub-Neptune-sized (2.49$^{+0.34}_{-0.24} R_\oplus$) planet (K2-66b) with a mass of 21.3 $\pm$ 3.6 $M_\oplus$. Because the star is evolving up the sub-giant branch, K2-66b receives a high level of irradiation, roughly twice the main sequence value. K2-66b may reside within the so-called "photoevaporation desert", a domain of planet size and incident flux that is almost completely devoid of planets. Its mass and radius imply that K2-66b has, at most, a meager envelope fraction (< 5%) and perhaps no envelope at all, making it one of the largest planets without a significant envelope. K2-106 hosts an ultra-short-period planet ($P$ = 13.7 hrs) that is one of the hottest sub-Neptune-size planets discovered to date. Its radius (1.82$^{+0.20}_{-0.14} R_\oplus$) and mass (9.0 $\pm$ 1.6 $M_\oplus$) are consistent with a rocky composition, as are all other small ultra-short-period planets with well-measured masses. K2-106 also hosts a larger, longer-period planet (Rp = 2.77$^{+0.37}_{-0.23} R_\oplus$, $P$ = 13.3 days) with a mass less than 24.4 $M_\oplus$ at 99.7% confidence. K2-66b and K2-106b probe planetary physics in extreme radiation environments. Their high densities reflect the challenge of retaining a substantial gas envelope in such extreme environments.
  • The NASA K2 mission uses photometry to find planets transiting stars of various types. M dwarfs are of high interest since they host more short period planets than any other type of main sequence stars and transiting planets around M dwarfs have deeper transits compared to other main sequence stars. In this paper, we present stellar parameters from K and M dwarfs hosting transiting planet candidates discovered by our team. Using the SOFI spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope, we obtained R ~ 1000 J-, H-, and K-band (0.95 - 2.52 microns) spectra of 34 late-type K2 planet and candidate planet host systems and 12 bright K4-M5 dwarfs with interferometrically measured radii and effective temperatures. Out of our 34 late-type K2 targets, we identify 27 of these stars as M dwarfs. We measure equivalent widths of spectral features, derive calibration relations using stars with interferometric measurements, and estimate stellar radii, effective temperatures, masses, and luminosities for the K2 planet hosts. Our calibrations provide radii and temperatures with median uncertainties of 0.059 R_sun (16.09%) and 160 K (4.33%), respectively. We then reassess the radii and equilibrium temperatures of known and candidate planets based on our spectroscopically derived stellar parameters. Since a planet's radius and equilibrium temperature depends on the parameters of its host star, our study provides more precise planetary parameters for planets and candidates orbiting late-type stars observed with K2. We find a median planet radius and an equilibrium temperature of approximately 3R_earth and 500 K, with several systems (K2-18b and K2-72e) receiving near-Earth like levels of incident irradiation.
  • A determination of the initial mass function (IMF) of the current, incomplete census of the 10 Myr-old TW Hya association (TWA) is presented. This census is built from a literature compilation supplemented with new spectra and 17 new radial velocities, as well as a re-analysis of Hipparcos data that confirmed HR 4334 (A2Vn) as a member. Though the dominant uncertainty in the IMF remains census incompleteness, a detailed statistical treatment is carried out to make the IMF determination independent of binning, while accounting for small number statistics. The currently known high-likelihood members are fitted by a log-normal distribution with a central mass of $0.21^{+0.11}_{-0.06}$ $M_{\odot}$ and a characteristic width of $0.8^{+0.2}_{-0.1}$ dex in the 12 $M_{\rm Jup}$-2 $M_{\odot}$ range, whereas a Salpeter power law with $\alpha = 2.2^{+1.1}_{-0.5}$ best describes the IMF slope in the $0.1-2$ $M_{\odot}$ range. This characteristic width is higher than other young associations, which may be due to incompleteness in the current census of low-mass TWA stars. A tentative overpopulation of isolated planetary-mass members similar to 2MASS J11472421-2040204 and 2MASS J11193254-1137466 is identified: this indicates that there might be as many as $10^{+13}_{-5}$ similar members of TWA with hot-start model-dependent masses estimated at $\sim$ 5-7 $M_{\rm Jup}$, most of which would be too faint to be detected in 2MASS. Our new radial velocity measurements corroborate the membership of 2MASS J11472421-2040204, and secure TWA 28 (M8.5$\gamma$), TWA 29 (M9.5$\gamma$) and TWA 33 (M4.5e) as members. The discovery of 2MASS J09553336-0208403, a young L7-type interloper unrelated to TWA, is also presented.
  • We report precise radial velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-47, a G star that hosts three transiting planets in close proximity (a hot Jupiter, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized planet) and a non-transiting planet at 1.4 AU. Through a joint analysis of previously published RVs and our own Keck-HIRES RVs, we significantly improve the planet mass and bulk density measurements. For the super-Earth WASP-47e ($P$ = 0.79 days), we measure a mass of 9.11 $\pm$ 1.17 $M_\oplus$, and a bulk density of 7.63 $\pm$ 1.90 g cm$^{-3}$, consistent with a rocky composition. For the hot Jupiter WASP-47b ($P$ = 4.2 days), we measure a mass of 356 $\pm$ 12 $M_\oplus$ (1.12 $\pm$ 0.04 $M_\rm{Jup}$) and constrain its eccentricity to $<0.021$ at 3-$\sigma$ confidence. For the Neptune-size planet WASP-47d ($P$ = 9.0 days), we measure a mass of 12.75 $\pm$ 2.70 $M_\oplus$, and a bulk density of 1.36 $\pm$ 0.42 g cm$^{-3}$, suggesting it has a thick H/He envelope. For the outer non-transiting planet, we measure a minimum mass of 411 $\pm$ 18 $M_\oplus$ (1.29 $\pm$ 0.06 $M_\rm{Jup}$), an orbital period of 595.7 $\pm$ 5.0 days, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.27 $\pm$ 0.04. Our new measurements are consistent with but 2$-$4$\times$ more precise than previous mass measurements.
  • Open clusters have been the focus of several exoplanet surveys but only a few planets have so far been discovered. The \emph{Kepler} spacecraft revealed an abundance of small planets around small, cool stars, therefore, such cluster members are prime targets for exoplanet transit searches. Kepler's new mission, K2, is targeting several open clusters and star-forming regions around the ecliptic to search for transiting planets around their low-mass constituents. Here, we report the discovery of the first transiting planet in the intermediate-age (800 Myr) Beehive cluster (Praesepe). K2-95 is a faint ($\mathrm{Kp = 15.5\,mag}$) $\mathrm{M3.0\pm0.5}$ dwarf from K2's Campaign 5 with an effective temperature of $\mathrm{3471 \pm 124\,K}$, approximately solar metallicity and a radius of $\mathrm{0.402 \pm 0.050 \,R_\odot}$. We detected a transiting planet with a radius of $\mathrm{3.47^{+0.78}_{-0.53} \, R_\oplus}$ and an orbital period of 10.134 days. We combined photometry, medium/high-resolution spectroscopy, adaptive optics/speckle imaging and archival survey images to rule out any false positive detection scenarios, validate the planet, and further characterize the system. The planet's radius is very unusual as M-dwarf field stars rarely have Neptune-sized transiting planets. The comparatively large radius of K2-95b is consistent with the other recently discovered cluster planets K2-25b (Hyades) and K2-33b (Upper Scorpius), indicating systematic differences in their evolutionary states or formation. These discoveries from K2 provide a snapshot of planet formation and evolution in cluster environments and thus make excellent laboratories to test differences between field-star and cluster planet populations.
  • We present 197 planet candidates discovered using data from the first year of the NASA K2 mission (Campaigns 0-4), along with the results of an intensive program of photometric analyses, stellar spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and statistical validation. We distill these candidates into sets of 104 validated planets (57 in multi-planet systems), 30 false positives, and 63 remaining candidates. Our validated systems span a range of properties, with median values of R_P = 2.3 R_E, P=8.6 d, Tef = 5300 K, and Kp=12.7 mag. Stellar spectroscopy provides precise stellar and planetary parameters for most of these systems. We show that K2 has increased by 30% the number of small planets known to orbit moderately bright stars (1-4 R_E, Kp=9-13 mag). Of particular interest are 37 planets smaller than 2 R_E, 15 orbiting stars brighter than Kp=11.5, five receiving Earth-like irradiation levels, and several multi-planet systems -- including four planets orbiting the M dwarf K2-72 near mean-motion resonances. By quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is a planet we demonstrate that our candidate sample has an overall false positive rate of 15-30%, with rates substantially lower for small candidates (< 2 R_E) and larger for candidates with radii > 8 R_E and/or with P < 3 d. Extrapolation of the current planetary yield suggests that K2 will discover between 500-1000 planets in its planned four-year mission -- assuming sufficient follow-up resources are available. Efficient observing and analysis, together with an organized and coherent follow-up strategy, is essential to maximize the efficacy of planet-validation efforts for K2, TESS, and future large-scale surveys.
  • The prime Kepler mission revealed that small planets (<4 R_earth) are common, especially around low-mass M dwarfs. K2, the re-purposed Kepler mission, continues this exploration of small planets around small stars. Here we combine K2 photometry with spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging, and archival survey images to analyze two small planets orbiting the nearby, field age, M dwarfs K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) and K2-9. K2-26 is an M1.0 +/- 0.5 dwarf at 93 +/- 7 pc from K2 Campaign 0. We validate its 14.5665 d period planet and estimate a radius of 2.67^+0.46_-0.42 R_earth. K2-9 is an M2.5 +/- 0.5 dwarf at 110 +/- 12 pc from K2 Campaign 1. K2-9b was first identified by Montet et al. 2015; here we present spectra and adaptive optics imaging of the host star and independently validate and characterize the planet. Our analyses indicate K2-9b is a 2.25^+0.53_-0.96 R_earth planet with a 18.4498 d period. K2-26b exhibits a transit duration that is too long to be consistent with a circular orbit given the measured stellar radius. Thus, the long transits are likely due to the photoeccentric effect and our transit fits hint at an eccentric orbit. Both planets receive low incident flux from their host stars and have estimated equilibrium temperatures <500 K. K2-9b may receive approximately Earth-like insolation. However, its host star exhibits strong GALEX UV emission which could affect any atmosphere it harbors. K2-26b and K2-9b are representatives of a poorly studied class of small planets with cool temperatures that have radii intermediate to Earth and Neptune. Future study of these systems can provide key insight into trends in bulk composition and atmospheric properties at the transition from silicate dominated to volatile rich bodies.
  • Discoveries from the prime Kepler mission demonstrated that small planets (< 3 Earth-radii) are common outcomes of planet formation. While Kepler detected many such planets, all but a handful orbit faint, distant stars and are not amenable to precise follow up measurements. Here, we report the discovery of two small planets transiting K2-21, a bright (K = 9.4) M0 dwarf located 65$\pm$6 pc from Earth. We detected the transiting planets in photometry collected during Campaign 3 of NASA's K2 mission. Analysis of transit light curves reveals that the planets have small radii compared to their host star, 2.60 $\pm$ 0.14% and 3.15 $\pm$ 0.20%, respectively. We obtained follow up NIR spectroscopy of K2-21 to constrain host star properties, which imply planet sizes of 1.59 $\pm$ 0.43 Earth-radii and 1.92 $\pm$ 0.53 Earth-radii, respectively, straddling the boundary between high-density, rocky planets and low-density planets with thick gaseous envelopes. The planets have orbital periods of 9.32414 days and 15.50120 days, respectively, and have a period ratio of 1.6624, very near to the 5:3 mean motion resonance, which may be a record of the system's formation history. Transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions between the planets may be detectable using ground-based telescopes. Finally, this system offers a convenient laboratory for studying the bulk composition and atmospheric properties of small planets with low equilibrium temperatures.
  • We develop a template-fit method to automatically identify and classify late-type K and M dwarfs in spectra from the LAMOST. A search of the commissioning data, acquired in 2009-2010, yields the identification of 2612 late-K and M dwarfs. The template fit method also provides spectral classification to half a subtype, classifies the stars along the dwarf-subdwarf metallicity sequence, and provides improved metallicity/gravity information on a finer scale. The automated search and classification is performed using a set of cool star templates assembled from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic database. We show that the stars can be efficiently classified despite shortcomings in the LAMOST commissioning data which include bright sky lines in the red. In particular we find that the absolute and relative strengths of the critical TiO and CaH molecular bands around 7000A are cleanly measured, which provides accurate spectral typing from late-K to mid-M, and makes it possible to estimate metallicities in a way that is more efficient and reliable than with the use of spectral indices or spectral-index based parameters such as zeta. Most of the cool dwarfs observed by LAMOST are found to be metal-rich dwarfs. We use a calibration of spectral type to absolute magnitude and estimate spectroscopic distances for all the stars; we also recover proper motions from the SUPERBLINK and PPMXL catalogs. Our analysis of the estimated transverse motions suggests a mean velocity and standard deviation for the UVW components of velocity to be: U=-9.8 km/s; V=-22.8 km/s; W=-7.9 km/s. The resulting values are general agreement with previous reported results, which yields confidence in our spectral classification and spectroscopic distance estimates, and illustrates the potential for using LAMOST spectra of K and M dwarfs for investigating the chemo-kinematics of the local Galactic disk and halo.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • We perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from the LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates, which show more reliable spectral features. Combining with the M dwarf/subdwarf templates in Zhong et al. (2015), we present an extended M-type templates library which includes not only M dwarfs with well-defined temperature and metallicity grid but also M giants with subtype from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fit algorithm were used to automatically identify and classify M giant stars from the LAMOST DR1. The result of M giant stars catalog is cross-matched with 2MASS JHKs and WISE W1/W2 infrared photometry. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giant stars by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity restframe. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants with uncertainties of about 40%. A catalog of 8639 M giants is provided. As an additional search result, we also present 101690 M dwarfs/subdwarfs catalog which were classified by our classification pipeline.
  • We present a method to estimate distances to stars with spectroscopically derived stellar parameters. The technique is a Bayesian approach with likelihood estimated via comparison of measured parameters to a grid of stellar isochrones, and returns a posterior probability density function for each star's absolute magnitude. This technique is tailored specifically to data from the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey. Because LAMOST obtains roughly 3000 stellar spectra simultaneously within each ~5-degree diameter "plate" that is observed, we can use the stellar parameters of the observed stars to account for the stellar luminosity function and target selection effects. This removes biasing assumptions about the underlying populations, both due to predictions of the luminosity function from stellar evolution modeling, and from Galactic models of stellar populations along each line of sight. Using calibration data of stars with known distances and stellar parameters, we show that our method recovers distances for most stars within ~20%, but with some systematic overestimation of distances to halo giants. We apply our code to the LAMOST database, and show that the current precision of LAMOST stellar parameters permits measurements of distances with ~40% error bars. This precision should improve as the LAMOST data pipelines continue to be refined.
  • Small, cool planets represent the typical end-products of planetary formation. Studying the archi- tectures of these systems, measuring planet masses and radii, and observing these planets' atmospheres during transit directly informs theories of planet assembly, migration, and evolution. Here we report the discovery of three small planets orbiting a bright (Ks = 8.6 mag) M0 dwarf using data collected as part of K2, the new transit survey using the re-purposed Kepler spacecraft. Stellar spectroscopy and K2 photometry indicate that the system hosts three transiting planets with radii 1.5-2.1 R_Earth, straddling the transition region between rocky and increasingly volatile-dominated compositions. With orbital periods of 10-45 days the planets receive just 1.5-10x the flux incident on Earth, making these some of the coolest small planets known orbiting a nearby star; planet d is located near the inner edge of the system's habitable zone. The bright, low-mass star makes this system an excellent laboratory to determine the planets' masses via Doppler spectroscopy and to constrain their atmospheric compositions via transit spectroscopy. This discovery demonstrates the ability of K2 and future space-based transit searches to find many fascinating objects of interest.
  • Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magneto-hydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lepine & Gaidos (2011) catalog of bright M dwarfs with the GALEX catalog of NUV (1771-2831A) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (> 2.5 sigma) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these "false positives" as ~16%. We constructed a NUV luminosity function that accounted for false positives, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.
  • We quantify and correct systematic errors in PPMXL proper motions using extragalactic sources from the first two LAMOST data releases and the Veron-Cetty & Veron Catalog of Quasars. Although the majority of the sources are from the Veron catalog, LAMOST makes important contributions in regions that are not well-sampled by previous catalogs, particularly at low Galactic latitudes and in the south Galactic cap. We show that quasars in PPMXL have measureable and significant proper motions, which reflect the systematic zero-point offsets present in the catalog. We confirm the global proper motion shifts seen by Wu, Ma, & Zhou (2011), and additionally find smaller-scale fluctuations of the QSO-derived corrections to an absolute frame. We average the proper motions of 158,106 extragalactic objects in bins of 3x3 degrees and present a table of proper motion corrections.
  • We have discovered a new high proper motion cataclysmic variable (CV) in the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey, which is sensitive to stars with proper motions greater than 40 mas/yr. This CV was selected for follow-up observations as part of a larger search for CVs selected based on proper motions and their NUV-V and V-K$_{s}$ colors. We present spectroscopic observations from the 2.4m Hiltner Telescope at MDM Observatory. The new CV's orbital period is near 96 minutes, its spectrum shows the double-peaked Balmer emission lines characteristic of quiescent dwarf novae, and its V magnitude is near 18.2. Additionally, we present a full list of known CVs in the SUPERBLINK catalog.
  • We present optical (BVRI) photometric measurements of a sample of 76 common proper motion wide separation main sequence binary pairs. The pairs are composed of a F-, G-, or K-type primary star and an M-type secondary. The sample is selected from the revised NLTT catalog and the LSPM catalog. The photometry is generally precise to 0.03 mag in all bands. We separate our sample into two groups, dwarf candidates and subdwarf candidates, using the reduced proper motion (RPM) diagram constructed with our improved photometry. The M subdwarf candidates in general have larger $V-R$ colors than the M dwarf candidates at a given $V-I$ color. This is consistent with an average metallicity difference between the two groups, as predicted by the PHOENIX/BT-Settl models. The improved photometry will be used as input into a technique to determine the metallicities of the M-type stars.
  • Knowledge of late K and M dwarf metallicities can be used to guide planet searches and constrain planet formation models. However, the determination of metallicities of late-type stars is difficult because visible wavelength spectra of their cool atmospheres contain many overlapping absorption lines, preventing the measurement of equivalent widths. We present new methods, and improved calibrations of existing methods, to determine metallicities of late-K and M dwarfs from moderate resolution (1300 < R < 2000) visible and infrared spectra. We select a sample of 112 wide binary systems that contain a late-type companion to a solar-type primary star. Our sample includes 62 primary stars with previously published metallicities, as well as 50 stars with metallicities determined from our own observations. We use our sample to empirically determine which features in the spectrum of the companion are best correlated with the metallicity of the primary. We derive metallicity calibrations for different wavelength ranges, and show that it is possible to get metallicities reliable to < 0.10 dex using either visible, J, H, or K band spectra. Our calibrations are applicable to dwarfs with metallicities of -1.04 < [Fe/H]< +0.56 and spectral types from K7 to M5. Lastly, we use our sample of wide binaries to test and refine existing calibrations to determine M dwarf metallicities. We find that the zeta parameter, which measures the ratio of TiO can CaH bands, is correlated with [Fe/H] for super-solar metallicities, and zeta does not always correctly identify metal-poor M dwarfs. We also find that existing calibrations in the K and H band are quite reliable for stars with [Fe/H] > -0.5, but are less useful for more metal-poor stars.