• Centaurus A, with its gas-rich elliptical host galaxy, NGC 5128, is the nearest radio galaxy at a distance of 3.8 Mpc. Its proximity allows us to study the interaction between an active galactic nucleus, radio jets, and molecular gas in great detail. We present ALMA observations of low J transitions of three CO isotopologues, HCN, HCO$^{+}$, HNC, CN, and CCH toward the inner projected 500 pc of NGC 5128. Our observations resolve physical sizes down to 40 pc. By observing multiple chemical probes, we determine the physical and chemical conditions of the nuclear interstellar medium of NGC 5128. This region contains molecular arms associated with the dust lanes and a circumnuclear disk (CND) interior to the molecular arms. The CND is approximately 400 pc by 200 pc and appears to be chemically distinct from the molecular arms. It is dominated by dense gas tracers while the molecular arms are dominated by $^{12}$CO and its rare isotopologues. The CND has a higher temperature, elevated CN/HCN and HCN/HNC intensity ratios, and much weaker $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O emission than the molecular arms. This suggests an influence from the AGN on the CND molecular gas. There is also absorption against the AGN with a low velocity complex near the systemic velocity and a high velocity complex shifted by about 60 km s$^{-1}$. We find similar chemical properties between the CND in emission and both the low and high velocity absorption complexes implying that both likely originate from the CND. If the HV complex does originate in the CND, then that gas would correspond to gas falling toward the supermassive black hole.
  • Multi-hydrogenated species with proper symmetry properties can present different spin configurations, and thus exist under different spin symmetry forms, labeled as para and ortho for two-hydrogen molecules. We investigated here the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of H$_2$Cl$^+$ in the light of new observations performed in the z=0.89 absorber toward the lensed quasar PKS 1830-211 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Two independent lines of sight were observed, to the southwest (SW) and northeast (NE) images of the quasar, with OPR values found to be $3.15 \pm 0.13$ and $3.1 \pm 0.5$ in each region, respectively, in agreement with a spin statistical weight of 3:1. An OPR of 3:1 for a molecule containing two identical hydrogen nuclei can refer to either a statistical result or a high-temperature limit depending on the reaction mechanism leading to its formation. It is thus crucial to identify rigorously how OPRs are produced in order to constrain the information that these probes can provide. To understand the production of the H$_2$Cl$^+$ OPR, we undertook a careful theoretical study of the reaction mechanisms involved with the aid of quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a new global potential energy surface fit to a large number of high-level ab initio data. Our study shows that the major formation reaction for H$_2$Cl$^+$ produces this ion via a hydrogen abstraction rather than a scrambling mechanism. Such a mechanism leads to a 3:1 OPR, which is not changed by destruction and possible thermalization reactions for H$_2$Cl$^+$ and is thus likely to be the cause of observed 3:1 OPR ratios, contrary to the normal assumption of scrambling.
  • We propose a framework for extracting the bone surface from B-mode images employing the eigenspace minimum variance (ESMV) beamformer and a ridge detection method. We show that an ESMV beamformer with a rank-1 signal subspace can preserve the bone anatomy and enhance the edges, despite an image which is less visually appealing due to some speckle pattern distortion. The beamformed images are post-processed using the phase symmetry (PS) technique. We validate this framework by registering the ultrasound images of a vertebra (in a water bath) against the corresponding Computed Tomography (CT) dataset. The results show a bone localization error in the same order of magnitude as the standard delay-and-sum (DAS) technique, but with approximately 20% smaller standard deviation (STD) of the image intensity distribution around the bone surface. This indicates a sharper bone surface detection. Further, the noise level inside the bone shadow is reduced by 60%. In in-vivo experiments, this framework is used for imaging the spinal anatomy. We show that PS images obtained from this beamformer setup have sharper bone boundaries in comparison with the standard DAS ones, and they are reasonably well separated from the surrounding soft tissue.
  • Active galactic nuclei (AGN) host some of the most energetic phenomena in the Universe. AGN are thought to be powered by accretion of matter onto a rotating disk that surrounds a supermassive black hole. Jet streams can be boosted in energy near the event horizon of the black hole and then flow outward along the rotation axis of the disk. The mechanism that forms such a jet and guides it over scales from a few light-days up to millions of light-years remains uncertain, but magnetic fields are thought to play a critical role. Using the Atacama large mm/submm array (ALMA), we have detected a polarization signal (Faraday rotation) related to the strong magnetic field at the jet base of a distant AGN, PKS1830-211. The amount of Faraday rotation (rotation measure) is proportional to the magnetic field strength along the line of sight times the density of electrons. Although it is impossible to precisely infer the magnetic fields in the region of Faraday rotation, the high rotation measures derived suggest magnetic fields of at least tens of Gauss (and possibly considerably higher) on scales of the order of light days (0.01 pc) from the black hole.
  • Argonium has recently been detected as a ubiquitous molecule in our Galaxy. Model calculations indicate that its abundance peaks at molecular fractions in the range of 1E-4 to 1E-3 and that the observed column densities require high values of the cosmic ray ionization rate. Therefore, this molecular cation may serve as an excellent tracer of the very diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), as well as an indicator of the cosmic ray ionization rate. We attempted to detect ArH+ in extragalactic sources to evaluate its diagnostic power as a tracer of the almost purely atomic ISM in distant galaxies. We obtained ALMA observations of a foreground galaxy at z = 0.89 in the direction of the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. Two isotopologs of argonium, 36ArH+ and 38ArH+, were detected in absorption along two different lines of sight toward PKS 1830-211, known as the SW and NE images of the background blazar. The argonium absorption is clearly enhanced on the more diffuse line of sight (NE) compared to other molecular species. The isotopic ratio 36Ar/38Ar is 3.46 +- 0.16 toward the SW image, i.e., significantly lower than the solar value of 5.5. Our results demonstrate the suitability of argonium as a tracer of the almost purely atomic, diffuse ISM in high-redshift sources. The evolution of the isotopic ratio with redshift may help to constrain nucleosynthetic scenarios in the early Universe.
  • We report a Herschel detection of high-J rotational CO lines from a dense knot in the supernova remnant Cas A. Based on a combined analysis of these rotational lines, and previously observed ro-vibrational CO lines, we find the gas to be warm (two components at 400 and 2000 K) and dense (1e6-7 cm-3), with a CO column density of 5e17 cm-2. This, along with the broad line widths (400 kms-1), suggests that the CO emission originates in the post-shock region of the reverse shock. As the passage of the reverse shock dissociates any existing molecules, the CO has most likely reformed in the last few years, in the post-shock gas. The CO cooling time is comparable to the CO formation time, so possible heating sources (UV photons from the shock front, X-rays, electron conduction) to maintain the large column density of warm CO are discussed.
  • An international consortium is presently constructing a beamformer for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile that will be available as a facility instrument. The beamformer will aggregate the entire collecting area of the array into a single, very large aperture. The extraordinary sensitivity of phased ALMA, combined with the extremely fine angular resolution available on baselines to the Northern Hemisphere, will enable transformational new very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations in Bands 6 and 7 (1.3 and 0.8 mm) and provide substantial improvements to existing VLBI arrays in Bands 1 and 3 (7 and 3 mm). The ALMA beamformer will have impact on a variety of scientific topics, including accretion and outflow processes around black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN), tests of general relativity near black holes, jet launch and collimation from AGN and microquasars, pulsar and magnetar emission processes, the chemical history of the universe and the evolution of fundamental constants across cosmic time, maser science, and astrometry.
  • The gravitational magnification provided by massive galaxy clusters makes it possible to probe the physical conditions in distant galaxies that are of lower luminosity than those in blank fields and likely more representative of the bulk of the high-redshift galaxy population. We aim to constrain the basic properties of molecular gas in a strongly magnified submm galaxy located behind the massive Bullet Cluster. This galaxy (SMM J0658) is split into three images, with a total magnification factor of almost 100. We used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to search for {12}CO(1--0) and {12}CO(3--2) line emission from SMM J0658. We also used the SABOCA bolometer camera on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope to measure the continuum emission at 350 micron. CO(1--0) and CO(3--2) are detected at 6.8 sigma and 7.5 sigma significance when the spectra toward the two brightest images of the galaxy are combined. From the CO(1-0) luminosity we derive a mass of cold molecular gas of (1.8 \pm 0.3) * 10^9 Msun, using the CO to H_2 conversion factor commonly used for luminous infrared galaxies. This is 45 \pm 25 % of the stellar mass. From the width of the CO lines we derive a dynamical mass within the CO-emitting region L of (1.3 \pm 0.4) * 10^10 (L/1 kpc) Msun. We refine the redshift determination of SMM J0658 to z=2.7793 \pm 0.0003. Continuum emission at 350 micron from SMM J0658 was detected with SABOCA at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.6. We study the spectral energy distribution of SMM J0658 and derive a dust temperature of 33\pm 5 K and a dust mass of 1.1*10^7 Msun. SMM J0658 is one of the least massive submm galaxies discovered so far. As a likely representative of the bulk of the submm galaxy population, it is a prime target for future observations.
  • We have used the sub-millimeter array to image the molecular envelope around IRC+10420. Our observations reveal a large and clumpy expanding envelope around the star. The molecular envelope shows a clear asymmetry in $^{12}$CO J=2--1 emission in the South-West direction. The elongation of the envelope is found even more pronounced in the emission of $^{13}$CO J=2--1 and SO J$_{\rm K}$=6$_5$--5$_4$. A small positional velocity gradient across velocity channels is seen in these lines, suggesting the presence of a weak bipolar outflow in the envelope of IRC+10420. In the higher resolution $^{12}$CO J=2--1 map, we find that the envelope has two components: (1) an inner shell (shell I) located between radius of about 1"-2"; (2) an outer shell (shell II) located between 3" to 6" in radius. These shells represent two previous mass-loss episodes from IRC+10420. We attempt to derive in self-consistent manner the physical conditions inside the envelope by modelling the dust properties, and the heating and cooling of molecular gas. We estimate a mass loss rate of $\sim$9 10$^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for shell I and 7 10$^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for shell II. The gas temperature is found to be unusually high in IRC+10420 in comparison with other oxygen-rich envelopes. The elevated gas temperature is mainly due to higher heating rate, which results from the large luminosity of the central s tar. We also derive an isotopic ratio $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C = 6.
  • We have investigated the presence of dense gas toward the radio source Cen A by looking at the absorption of the HCO+ and HCN (3-2) lines in front of the bright continuum source with the Submillimeter Array. We detect narrow HCO+ (3-2) absorption, and tentatively HCN (3-2), close to the systemic velocity. For both molecules, the J=3-2 absorption is much weaker than for the J=1-0 line. From simple excitation analysis, we conclude that the gas density is on the order of a few 10^4 cm^-3 for a column density N(HCO+)/dV of 3x10^12 cm^-2 km^-1 s and a kinetic temperature of 10 K. In particular, we find no evidence for molecular gas density higher than a few 10^4 cm^-3 on the line of sight to the continuum source. We discuss the implications of our finding on the nature of the molecular gas responsible for the absorption toward Cen A.
  • We have used the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to make the first interferometric observations (beam size ~1") of the 12CO J=6-5 line and 435 micron (690 GHz) continuum emission toward the central region of the nearby ULIRG Arp 220. These observations resolve the eastern and western nuclei from each other, in both the molecular line and dust continuum emission. At 435 micron, the peak intensity of the western nucleus is stronger than the eastern nucleus, and the difference in peak intensities is less than at longer wavelengths. Fitting a simple model to the dust emission observed between 1.3 mm and 435 micron suggests that dust emissivity power law index in the western nucleus is near unity and steeper in the eastern nucleus, about 2, and that the dust emission is optically thick at the shorter wavelength. Comparison with single dish measurements indicate that the interferometer observations are missing ~60% of the dust emission, most likely from a spatially extended component to which these observations are not sensitive. The 12CO J=6-5 line observations clearly resolve kinematically the two nuclei. The distribution and kinematics of the 12CO J=6-5 line appear to be very similar to lower J CO lies observed at similar resolution. Analysis of multiple 12CO line intensities indicates that the molecular gas in both nuclei have similar excitation conditions, although the western nucleus is warmer and denser. The excitation conditions are similar to those found in other extreme environments, including M82, Mrk 231, and BR 1202-0725. Simultaneous lower resolution observations of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J=2-1 lines show that the 13CO and C18O lines have similar intensities, which suggests that both of these lines are optically thick, or possibly that extreme high mass star formation has produced in an overabundance of C18O.
  • A 12 year-long monitoring of the absorption caused by a z=0.89 spiral galaxy on the line of sight to the radio-loud gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211 reveals spectacular changes in the HCO+ and HCN (2-1) line profiles. The depth of the absorption toward the quasar NE image increased by a factor of ~3 in 1998-1999 and subsequently decreased by a factor >=6 between 2003 and 2006. These changes were echoed by similar variations in the absorption line wings toward the SW image. Most likely, these variations result from a motion of the quasar images with respect to the foreground galaxy, which could be due to a sporadic ejection of bright plasmons by the background quasar. VLBA observations have shown that the separation between the NE and SW images changed in 1997 by as much as 0.2 mas within a few months. Assuming that motions of similar amplitude occurred in 1999 and 2003, we argue that the clouds responsible for the NE absorption and the broad wings of the SW absorption should be sparse and have characteristic sizes of 0.5-1 pc.
  • We report a search for the presence of dust in the intra-cluster medium based on the study of statistical reddening of background galaxies. Armed with the Red Sequence Cluster survey data, from which we extracted (i) a catalog of 458 clusters with z_clust < 0.5 and (ii) a catalog of ~90,000 galaxies with photometric redshift 0.5 < z_ph < 0.8 and photometric redshift uncertainty delta z_ph / (1+z_ph) < 0.06, we have constructed several samples of galaxies according to their projected distances to the cluster centers. No significant color differences [<E(B-R_c)> = 0.005 pm 0.008, and <E(V-z')> = 0.000 pm 0.008] were found for galaxies background to the clusters, compared to the references. Assuming a Galactic extinction law, we derive an average visual extinction of <A_V> = 0.004 pm 0.010 towards the inner 1x R_200 of clusters.
  • Previous molecular gas observations at arcsecond-scale resolution of the Seyfert 2 galaxy M51 suggest the presence of a dense circumnuclear rotating disk, which may be the reservoir for fueling the active nucleus and obscures it from direct view in the optical. However, our recent interferometric CO(3-2) observations show a hint of a velocity gradient perpendicular to the rotating disk, which suggests a more complex structure than previously thought. To image the putative circumnuclear molecular gas disk at sub-arcsecond resolution to better understand both the spatial distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas. We carried out CO(2-1) and CO(1-0) line observations of the nuclear region of M51 with the new A configuration of the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, yielding a spatial resolution lower than 15 pc. The high resolution images show no clear evidence of a disk, aligned nearly east-west and perpendicular to the radio jet axis, as suggested by previous observations, but show two separate features located on the eastern and western sides of the nucleus. The western feature shows an elongated structure along the jet and a good velocity correspondence with optical emission lines associated with the jet, suggesting that this feature is a jet-entrained gas. The eastern feature is elongated nearly east-west ending around the nucleus. A velocity gradient appears in the same direction with increasingly blueshifted velocities near the nucleus. This velocity gradient is in the opposite sense of that previously inferred for the putative circumnuclear disk. Possible explanations for the observed molecular gas distribution and kinematics are that a rotating gas disk disturbed by the jet, gas streaming toward the nucleus, or a ring with another smaller counter- or Keplarian-rotating gas disk inside.
  • With the Plateau de Bure interferometer, we have measured the C, N, O and S isotopic abundance ratios in the arm of a spiral galaxy with a redshift of 0.89. The galaxy is seen face-on according to HST images. Its bulge intercepts the line of sight to the radio-loud quasar PKS 1830-211, giving rise at mm wavelengths to two Einstein images located each behind a spiral arm. The arms appear in absorption in the lines of several molecules, giving the opportunity to study the chemical composition of a galaxy only a few Gyr old. The isotopic ratios in this spiral galaxy differ markedly from those observed in the Milky Way. The $^{17}$O/$^{18}$O and $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratios are low, as one would expect from an object too young to let low mass stars play a major role in the regeneration of the gas.
  • Recently, we have developed and calibrated the Synthetic Field Method (SFM) to derive the total extinction through disk galaxies. The method is based on the number counts and colors of distant background field galaxies that can be seen through the foreground object, and has been successfully applied to NGC 4536 and NGC 3664, two late-type galaxies located, respectively, at 16 and 11 Mpc. Here, we study the applicability of the SFM to HST images of galaxies in the Local Group, and show that background galaxies cannot be easily identified through these nearby objects, even with the best resolution available today. In the case of M 31, each pixel in the HST images contains 50 to 100 stars, and the background galaxies cannot be seen because of the intrinsic granularity due to strong surface brightness fluctuations. In the LMC, on the other hand, there is only about one star every six linear pixels, and the lack of detectable background galaxies results from a ``secondary'' granularity, introduced by structure in the wings of the point spread function. The success of the SFM in NGC 4536 and NGC 3664 is a natural consequence of the reduction of the intensity of surface brightness fluctuations with distance. When the dominant confusion factor is structure in the PSF wings, as is the case of HST images of the LMC, and would happen in M 31 images obtained with a 10-m diffraction- limited optical telescope, it becomes in principle possible to improve the detectability of background galaxies by subtracting the stars in the foreground object. However, a much better characterization of optical PSFs than is currently available would be required for an adequate subtraction of the wings. Given the importance of determining the dust content of Local Group galaxies, efforts should be made in that direction.