• A core process in many quantum tasks is the generation of entanglement. It is being actively studied in a variety of physical settings - from simple bipartite systems to complex multipartite systems. In this work we experimentally study the generation of bipartite entanglement in a nanophotonic system. Entanglement is generated via the quantum interference of two surface plasmon polaritons in a beamsplitter structure, i.e. utilising the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect, and its presence is verified using quantum state tomography. The amount of entanglement is quantified by the concurrence and we find values of up to 0.77 +/- 0.04. Verifying entanglement in the output state from HOM interference is a nontrivial task and cannot be inferred from the visibility alone. The techniques we use to verify entanglement could be applied to other types of photonic system and therefore may be useful for the characterisation of a range of different nanophotonic quantum devices.
  • We derive a novel computational scheme for functional Renormalization Group (fRG) calculations for interacting fermions on 2D lattices. The scheme is based on the exchange parametrization fRG for the two-fermion interaction, with additional insertions of truncated partitions of unity. These insertions decouple the fermionic propagators from the exchange propagators and lead to a separation of the underlying equations. We demonstrate that this separation is numerically advantageous and may pave the way for refined, large-scale computational investigations even in the case of complex multiband systems. Furthermore, on the basis of speedup data gained from our implementation, it is shown that this new variant facilitates efficient calculations on a large number of multi-core CPUs. We apply the scheme to the $t$,$t'$ Hubbard model on a square lattice to analyze the convergence of the results with the bond length of the truncation of the partition of unity. In most parameter areas, a fast convergence can be observed. Finally, we compare to previous results in order to relate our approach to other fRG studies.
  • Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • We study a bosonic matter excitation coupled to a single-mode cavity field via electric dipole. Counter-rotating and $A^2$ terms are included in the interaction model, ${\mathbf A}$ being the vector potential of the cavity field. In the ultrastrong coupling regime the vacuum of the bare modes is no longer the ground state of the Hamiltonian and contains a nonzero population of polaritons, the true normal modes of the system. If the parameters of the model satisfy the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, we find that the two polaritons are always equally populated. We show how this prediction could be tested in a quenching experiment, by rapidly switching on the coupling and analyzing the radiation emitted by the cavity. A refinement of the model based on a microscopic minimal coupling Hamiltonian is also provided, and its consequences on our results are characterized analytically.
  • Attosecond streaking of photoelectrons emitted by extreme ultraviolet light has begun to reveal how electrons behave during their transport within simple crystalline solids. Many sample types within nanoplasmonics, thin-film physics, and semiconductor physics, however, do not have a simple single crystal structure. The electron dynamics which underpin the optical response of plasmonic nanostructures and wide-bandgap semiconductors happen on an attosecond timescale. Measuring these dynamics using attosecond streaking will enable such systems to be specially tailored for applications in areas such as ultrafast opto-electronics. We show that streaking can be extended to this very general type of sample by presenting streaking measurements on an amorphous film of the wide-bandgap semiconductor tungsten trioxide, and on polycrystalline gold, a material that forms the basis of many nanoplasmonic devices. Our measurements reveal the near-field temporal structure at the sample surface, and photoelectron wavepacket temporal broadening consistent with a spread of electron transport times to the surface.
  • We investigate the superconducting pairing instabilities of eight-band models for the iron arsenides. Using a functional renormalization group treatment, we determine how the critical energy scale for superconductivity depends on the electronic band structure. Most importantly, if we vary the parameters from values corresponding to LaFeAsO to SmFeAsO, the pairing scale is strongly enhanced, in accordance with the experimental observation. We analyze the reasons for this trend and compare the results of the eight-band approach to those found using five-band models.
  • We report direct evidence of the bosonic nature of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in a scattering-based beamsplitter. A parametric down-conversion source is used to produce two indistinguishable photons, each of which is converted into a SPP on a metal-stripe waveguide and then made to interact through a semi-transparent Bragg mirror. In this plasmonic analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment, we measure a coincidence dip with a visibility of 72%, a key signature that SPPs are bosons and that quantum interference is clearly involved.
  • We consider the integration of quantum emitters into a negative permeability metamaterial design in order to introduce tunability as well as nonlinear behavior. The unit cell of our metamaterial is a ring of metamolecules, each consisting of a metal nanoparticle and a two-level semiconductor quantum dot (QD). Without the QDs, the ring of the unit cell is known to act as an artificial optical magnetic resonator. By adding the QDs we show that a Fano interference profile is introduced into the magnetic field scattered from the ring. This induced interference is shown to cause an appreciable effect in the collective magnetic resonance of the unit cell. We find that the interference provides a means to tune the response of the negative permeability metamaterial. The exploitation of the QD's inherent nonlinearity is proposed to modulate the metamaterial's magnetic response with a separate control field.
  • Quantum plasmonics is a rapidly growing field of research that involves the study of the quantum properties of light and its interaction with matter at the nanoscale. Here, surface plasmons - electromagnetic excitations coupled to electron charge density waves on metal-dielectric interfaces or localized on metallic nanostructures - enable the confinement of light to scales far below that of conventional optics. In this article we review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation of the quantum properties of surface plasmons, their role in controlling light-matter interactions at the quantum level and potential applications. Quantum plasmonics opens up a new frontier in the study of the fundamental physics of surface plasmons and the realization of quantum-controlled devices, including single-photon sources, transistors and ultra-compact circuitry at the nanoscale.
  • Surface plasmons on metals can concentrate light into sub-nanometric volumes and on these near atomic length scales the electronic response at the metal interface is smeared out over a Thomas-Fermi screening length. This nonlocality is a barrier to a good understanding of atomic scale response to light and complicates the practical matter of computing the fields. In this letter, we present a local analogue model and show that spatial nonlocality can be represented by replacing the nonlocal metal with a composite material, comprising a thin dielectric layer on top of a local metal. This method not only makes possible the quantitative analysis of nonlocal effects in complex plasmonic phenomena with unprecedented simplicity and physical insight, but also offers great practical advantages in their numerical treatment.
  • We report near-field scanning optical imaging with an active tip made of a single fluorescent CdSe nanocrystal attached at the apex of an optical tip. Although the images are acquired only partially because of the random blinking of the semiconductor particle, our work validates the use of such tips in ultra-high spatial resolution optical microscopy.
  • Carbon nanofibers (CNF) are used as components of planar photonic crystals. Square and rectangular lattices and random patterns of vertically aligned CNF were fabricated and their properties studied using ellipsometry. We show that detailed information such as symmetry directions and the band structure of these novel materials can be extracted from considerations of the polarization state in the specular beam. The refractive index of the individual nanofibers was found to be n_CNF = 4.1.