• The nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 is an excellent laboratory for studies of extreme astrophysical environments. For 20 years, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has been used to monitor a population of compact sources thought to be supernovae (SNe), supernova remnants (SNRs) and possibly active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using new and archival VLBI data spanning 20 years, we obtain 23 high-resolution radio images of Arp 220 at wavelengths from 18 cm to 2 cm. From model-fitting to the images we obtain estimates of flux densities and sizes of all detected sources. We detect radio continuum emission from 97 compact sources and present flux densities and sizes for all analysed observation epochs. We find evidence for a LD-relation within Arp 220, with larger sources being less luminous. We find a compact source LF $n(L)\propto L^\beta$ with $\beta=-2.19\pm0.15$, similar to SNRs in normal galaxies. Based on simulations we argue that there are many relatively large and weak sources below our detection threshold. The observations can be explained by a mixed population of SNe and SNRs, where the former expand in a dense circumstellar medium (CSM) and the latter interact with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Nine sources are likely luminous, type IIn SNe. This number of luminous SNe correspond to few percent of the total number of SNe in Arp 220 which is consistent with a total SN-rate of 4 yr$^{-1}$ as inferred from the total radio emission given a normal stellar initial mass function (IMF). Based on the fitted luminosity function, we argue that emission from all compact sources, also below our detection threshold, make up at most 20\% of the total radio emission at GHz frequencies.
  • We present new CO(2-1) observations of 3 low-z (~350 Mpc) ULIRG systems (6 nuclei) observed with ALMA at high-spatial resolution (~500 pc). We detect massive cold molecular gas outflows in 5 out of 6 nuclei (0.3-5)x10^8 Msun. These outflows are spatially resolved with deprojected radii of 0.25-1 kpc although high-velocity molecular gas is detected up to ~0.5-1.8 kpc (1-6 kpc deprojected). The mass outflow rates are 12-400 Msun/yr and the inclination corrected average velocity of the outflowing gas 350-550 km/s (v_max = 500-900 km/s). The origin of these outflows can be explained by the nuclear starbursts although the contribution of an obscured AGN can not be completely ruled out. The position angle (PA) of the outflowing gas along the kinematic minor axis of the nuclear molecular disk suggests that the outflow axis is perpendicular to the disk for three of these outflows. Only in one case, the outflow PA is clearly not along the kinematic minor axis. The outflow depletion times are 15-80 Myr which are slightly shorter than the star-formation (SF) depletion times (30-80 Myr). However, we estimate that only 15-30% of the outflowing gas will escape the gravitational potential of the nucleus. The majority of the outflowing gas will return to the disk after 5-10 Myr and become available to form new stars. Therefore, these outflows will not likely quench the nuclear starbursts. These outflows would be consistent with being driven by radiation pressure (momentum-driven) only if the coupling between radiation and dust increases with increasing SF rates. This can be achieved if the dust optical depth is higher in objects with higher SF. The relatively small sizes (<1 kpc) and dynamical times (<3 Myr) of the cold molecular outflows suggests that molecular gas cannot survive longer in the outflow environment or that it cannot form efficiently beyond these distances or times. (Abridged)
  • Minor mergers are important processes contributing significantly to how galaxies evolve across the age of the Universe. Their impact on supermassive black hole growth and star formation is profound. The detailed study of dense molecular gas in galaxies provides an important test of the validity of the relation between star formation rate and HCN luminosity on different galactic scales. We use observations of HCN, HCO+1-0 and CO3-2 to study the dense gas properties in the Medusa merger. We calculate the brightness temperature ratios and use them in conjunction with a non-LTE radiative line transfer model. The HCN and HCO+1-0, and CO3-2 emission do not occupy the same structures as the less dense gas associated with the lower-J CO emission. The only emission from dense gas is detected in a 200pc region within the "Eye of the Medusa". No HCN or HCO+ is detected for the extended starburst. The CO3-2/2-1 brightness temperature ratio inside "the Eye" is ~2.5 - the highest ratio found so far. The line ratios reveal an extreme, fragmented molecular cloud population inside "the Eye" with large temperatures (>300K) and high gas densities (>10^4 cm^-3). "The Eye" is found at an interface between a large-scale minor axis inflow and the Medusa central region. The extreme conditions inside "the Eye" may be the result of the radiative and mechanical feedback from a deeply embedded, young, massive super star cluster, formed due to the gas pile-up at the intersection. Alternatively, shocks from the inflowing gas may be strong enough to shock and fragment the gas. For both scenarios, however, it appears that the HCN and HCO+ dense gas tracers are not probing star formation, but instead a post-starburst and/or shocked ISM that is too hot and fragmented to form new stars. Thus, caution is advised in linking the detection of emission from dense gas tracers to evidence of ongoing or imminent star formation.
  • NGC 4945 is one of the nearest (~3.8 Mpc; 1" ~ 19 pc) starburst galaxies. ALMA band 3 (3--4\,mm) observations of HCN, HCO+, CS, C3H2, SiO, HCO, and CH3C2H were carried out with ~2" resolution. The lines reveal a rotating nuclear disk of projected size 10" x 2" with position angle ~45 deg, inclination ~75 deg and an unresolved bright central core of size <2.5". The continuum source (mostly free-free radiation) is more compact than the nuclear disk by a linear factor of two but shows the same position angle and is centered 0.39" +_ 0.14" northeast of the nuclear accretion disk defined by H2O maser emission. Outside the nuclear disk, both HCN and CS delineate molecular arms on opposite sides of the dynamical center. These are connected by a (deprojected) 0.6 kpc sized molecular bridge, likely a dense gaseous bar seen almost ends-on, shifting gas from the front and back side into the nuclear disk. Modeling this nuclear disk located farther inside <100 pc) with tilted rings indicates a coplanar outflow reaching a characteristic deprojectd velocity of ~50 km/s. All our molecular lines, with the notable exception of CH3C2H, show significant absorption near the systemic velocity (~571 km/s), within a range of ~500-660 km/s. Apparently, only molecular transitions with low critical H2-density do not show absorption. The velocity field of the nuclear disk, derived from CH3C2H, provides evidence for rigid rotation in the inner few arcseconds and a dynamical mass of M = (2.1+_0.2) x 10^8 Mo inside a galactocentric radius of 2.45", with a significantly flattened rotation curve farther out. Velocity integrated line intensity maps with most pronounced absorption show molecular peak positions up to 1.5" southwest of the continuum peak, presumably due to absorption, which appears to be most severe slightly northeast of the nuclear maser disk.
  • We present the first data release of high-resolution ($\leq0.2$ arcsec) 1.5-GHz radio images of 103 nearby galaxies from the Palomar sample, observed with the eMERLIN array, as part of the LeMMINGs survey. This sample includes galaxies which are active (LINER and Seyfert) and quiescent (HII galaxies and Absorption line galaxies, ALG), which are reclassified based upon revised emission-line diagrams. We detect radio emission $\gtrsim$ 0.2 mJy for 47/103 galaxies (22/34 for LINERS, 4/4 for Seyferts, 16/51 for HII galaxies and 5/14 for ALGs) with radio sizes typically of $\lesssim$100 pc. We identify the radio core position within the radio structures for 41 sources. Half of the sample shows jetted morphologies. The remaining half shows single radio cores or complex morphologies. LINERs show radio structures more core-brightened than Seyferts. Radio luminosities of the sample range from 10$^{32}$ to 10$^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$: LINERs and HII galaxies show the highest and the lowest radio powers respectively, while ALGs and Seyferts have intermediate luminosities. We find that radio core luminosities correlate with black hole (BH) mass down to $\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\odot}$, but a break emerges at lower masses. Using [O III] line luminosity as a proxy for the accretion luminosity, active nuclei and jetted HII galaxies follow an optical fundamental plane of BH activity, suggesting a common disc-jet relationship. In conclusion, LINER nuclei are the scaled-down version of FR I radio galaxies; Seyferts show less collimated jets; HII galaxies may host weak active BHs and/or nuclear star-forming cores; and recurrent BH activity may account for ALG properties.
  • Feedback in the form of mass outflows driven by star formation or active galactic nuclei is a key component of galaxy evolution. The luminous infrared galaxy Zw 049.057 harbours a compact obscured nucleus with a possible far-IR signature of outflowing molecular gas. Due to the high optical depths at far-IR wavelengths, the interpretation of the outflow signature is uncertain. At mm and radio wavelengths, the radiation is better able to penetrate the large columns of gas and dust. We used high resolution observations from the SMA, ALMA, and the VLA to image the CO 2-1 and 6-5 emission, the 690 GHz continuum, the radio cm continuum, and absorptions by rotationally excited OH. The CO line profiles exhibit wings extending 300 km/s beyond the systemic velocity. At cm wavelengths, we find a compact (40 pc) continuum component in the nucleus, with weaker emission extending several 100 pc approximately along the major and minor axes of the galaxy. In the OH absorption lines toward the compact continuum, wings extending to a similar velocity as for the CO are seen on the blue side of the profile. The weak cm continuum emission along the minor axis is aligned with a highly collimated, jet-like dust feature previously seen in near-IR images of the galaxy. Comparison of the apparent optical depths in the OH lines indicate that the excitation conditions in Zw 049.057 differ from those in other OH megamaser galaxies. We interpret the wings in the spectral lines as signatures of a molecular outflow. A relation between this outflow and the minor axis radio feature is possible, although further studies are required to investigate this possible association and understand the connection between the outflow and the nuclear activity. Finally, we suggest that the differing OH excitation conditions are further evidence that Zw 049.057 is in a transition phase between megamaser and kilomaser activity.
  • We study the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity on the chemistry of molecular gas in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing if the abundances of key molecular species like ethynyl (C2H), a classical tracer of PDR, change in the different environments of the disk of the galaxy. We have used ALMA to map the emission of the hyperfine multiplet of C2H(N=1-0) and its underlying continuum emission in the central r~35"(2.5kpc)-region of the disk of NGC1068 with a spatial resolution 1.0"x0.7"(50-70pc). We have developed a set of time-dependent chemical models to determine the origin of the C2H gas. A sizeable fraction of the total C2H line emission is detected from the r~1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. However, the brightest C2H emission originates from a r~200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), where evidence of a molecular outflow has been previously found in other molecular tracers imaged by ALMA. We also detect significant emission that connects the CND with the outer disk. We derived the fractional abundances of C2H (X(C2H)) assuming LTE conditions. Our estimates range from X(C2H)~a few 10^-8 in the SB ring up to X(C2H)~ a few 10^-7 in the outflow region. PDR models that incorporate gas-grain chemistry are able to account for X(C2H) in the SB ring for moderately dense (n(H2)>10^4 cm^-3) and moderately UV-irradiated gas (UV-field<10xDraine field) in a steady-state regime. However, the high fractional abundances estimated for C2H in the outflow region can only be reached at very early times (T< 10^2-10^3 yr) in models of UV/X-ray irradiated dense gas (n(H2)>10^4-10^5) cm^-3). We interpret that the transient conditions required to fit the high values of X(C2H) in the outflow are likely due to UV/X-ray irradiated non-dissociative shocks associated with the highly turbulent interface between the outflow and the molecular gas in NGC1068.
  • We used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to map the CO(3-2) and the underlying continuum emissions around the type 1 low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN; bolometric luminosity $\lesssim 10^{42}$ erg~s$^{-1}$) of NGC 1097 at $\sim 10$ pc resolution. These observations revealed a detailed cold gas distribution within a $\sim 100$ pc of this LLAGN. In contrast to the luminous Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068, where a $\sim 7$ pc cold molecular torus was recently revealed, a distinctively dense and compact torus is missing in our CO(3-2) integrated intensity map of NGC 1097. Based on the CO(3-2) flux, the gas mass of the torus of NGC 1097 would be a factor of $\gtrsim 2-3$ less than that found for NGC 1068 by using the same CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor, which implies less active nuclear star formation and/or inflows in NGC 1097. Our dynamical modeling of the CO(3-2) velocity field implies that the cold molecular gas is concentrated in a thin layer as compared to the hot gas traced by the 2.12 $\mu$m H$_2$ emission in and around the torus. Furthermore, we suggest that NGC 1097 hosts a geometrically thinner torus than NGC 1068. Although the physical origin of the torus thickness remains unclear, our observations support a theoretical prediction that geometrically thick tori with high opacity will become deficient as AGNs evolve from luminous Seyferts to LLAGNs.
  • We present the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the circumnuclear disk (CND, 400 pc x 200 pc) of Centaurus A with resolutions of ~5 pc (0.3 arcsec) and shed light onto the mechanism feeding the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) using CO(3-2), HCO+(4-3), HCN(4-3), and CO(6-5) observations obtained with ALMA. Multiple filaments or streamers of tens to a hundred parsec scale exist within the CND, which form a ring-like structure with an unprojected diameter of 9 x 6 arcsec (162pc x 108pc) and a position angle PA = 155deg. Inside the nuclear ring, there are two leading and straight filamentary structures with lengths of about 30-60pc at PA = 120deg on opposite sides of the AGN, with a rotational symmetry of 180deg and steeper position-velocity diagrams, which are interpreted as nuclear shocks due to non-circular motions. Along the filaments, and unlike other nearby AGNs, several dense molecular clumps present low HCN/HCO+(4-3) ratios (~0.5). The filaments abruptly end in the probed transitions at r = 20pc from the AGN, but previous near-IR H2 (J=1-0) S(1) maps show that they continue in an even ~1000 K), winding up in the form of nuclear spirals, and forming an inner ring structure with another set of symmetric filaments along the N-S direction and within r = 10pc. The molecular gas is governed primarily by non-circular motions, being the successive shock fronts at different scales where loss of angular momentum occurs, a mechanism which may feed efficiently powerful radio galaxies down to parsec scales.
  • The galaxy NGC 4418 harbours a compact ($<20$ pc) core with a very high bolometric luminosity ($\sim10^{11}$L$_\odot$). As most of the galaxy's energy output comes from this small region, it is of interest to determine what fuels this intense activity. An interaction with VV 655 has been proposed, where gas aquired by NGC 4418 could trigger intense star formation and/or black hole accretion in the centre. We aim to constrain the interaction hypothesis by studying neutral hydrogen structures around the two galaxies. We present observations at 1.4 GHz with the Very Large Array of radio continuum as well as emission and absorption from atomic hydrogen. Gaussian distributions are fitted to observed HI emission and absorption spectra. An atomic HI bridge is seen in emission, connecting NGC 4418 to VV 655. While NGC 4418 is bright in continuum emission and seen in HI absorption, VV 655 is barely detected in the continuum but show bright HI emission (M$_\mathrm{HI}\sim10^9$ M$_\odot$). We estimate SFRs from 1.4 GHz of 3.2 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ and 0.13 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for NGC 4418 and VV 655 respectively. Systemic HI velocities of 2202$\pm$20 km s$^{-1}$ (emission) and 2105.4$\pm$10 km s$^{-1}$ (absorption) are measured for VV 655 and NGC 4418 respectively. Redshifted HI absorption is seen towards NGC 4418, suggesting gas infall. Blueshifted HI-emission is seen north-west of NGC 4418, which we interpret as a continuation of the outflow previously discussed by Sakamoto et al. (2013). The morphology and velocity structure seen in HI is consistent with an interaction scenario, where gas was transferred from VV 655 to NGC 4418, and may fuel the activity in the centre.
  • Extragalactic observations of water emission can provide valuable insights into the excitation of the interstellar medium. In addition, extragalactic megamasers are powerful probes of kinematics close to active nuclei. Therefore, it is paramount to determine the true origin of the water emission, whether it is excited by processes close to an AGN or in star-forming regions. We use ALMA Band 5 science verification observations to analyse the emission of the 183 GHz water line in Arp 220 on sub-arcsecond scales, in conjunction with new ALMA Band 7 data at 325 GHz. Specifically, the nature of the process leading to the excitation of emission at these water lines is studied in this context. Supplementary 22 GHz VLA observations are used to better constrain the parameter space in the excitation modelling of the water lines. We detect 183 GHz H2O and 325 GHz water emission towards the two compact nuclei at the center of Arp 220, being brighter in Arp 220 West. The emission at these two frequencies is compared to previous single-dish data and does not show evidence of variability. The 183 and 325 GHz lines show similar spectra and kinematics, but the 22 GHz profile is significantly different in both nuclei due to a blend with an NH3 absorption line. Our findings suggest that the most likely scenario to cause the observed water emission in Arp 220 is a large number of independent masers originating from numerous star-forming regions.
  • High resolution submm observations are important in probing the morphology, column density and dynamics of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). With high resolution (0.06 x 0.05) ALMA 690 GHz observations we have found bright (TB >80 K) and compact (FWHM 10x7 pc) CO 6-5 line emission in the nucleus of the extremely radio-quiet galaxy NGC1377. The integrated CO 6-5 intensity is aligned with the previously discovered jet/outflow of NGC1377 and is tracing the dense (n>1e4 cm-3), hot gas at the base of the outflow. The velocity structure is complex and shifts across the jet/outflow are discussed in terms of jet-rotation or separate, overlapping kinematical components. High velocity gas (deltaV +-145 km/s) is detected inside r<2-3 pc and we suggest that it is emerging from an inclined rotating disk or torus of position angle PA=140+-20 deg with a dynamical mass of approx 3e6 Msun. This mass is consistent with that of a supermassive black hole (SMBH), as inferred from the M-sigma relation. The gas mass of the proposed disk/torus constitutes <3% of the nuclear dynamical mass. In contrast to the intense CO 6-5 line emission, we do not detect dust continuum with an upper limit of S(690GHz)<2mJy. The corresponding, 5 pc, H2 column density is estimated to N(H2)<3e23 cm-2, which is inconsistent with a Compton Thick (CT) source. We discuss the possibility that CT obscuration may be occuring on small (subparsec) or larger scales. From SED fitting we suggest that half of the IR emission of NGC1377 is nuclear and the rest (mostly the far-infrared (FIR)) is more extended. The extreme radio quietness, and the lack of emission from other star formation tracers, raise questions on the origin of the FIR emission. We discuss the possibility that it is arising from the dissipation of shocks in the molecular jet/outflow or from irradiation by the nuclear source along the poles.
  • We present new ALMA Band 7 ($\sim340$ GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120-5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4-3) emission, relative to HCO$^+$ (4-3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of $\sim1.2$ yr$^{-1}$, the high HCN/HCO$^+$ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high $\Sigma_{IR}$ of $4.7\times10^{12}$ $L_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H$_2$O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of $\sim40$ K. IRAS 13120-5453 has a lower dust temperature and $\Sigma_{IR}$ than is inferred for the systems termed "compact obscured nuclei" (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120-5453 has undergone a compact obscured nucleus phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/AGN core.
  • We present new IRAM 30m spectroscopic observations of the $\sim88$ GHz band, including emission from the CCH (n=1-0) multiplet, HCN (1-0), HCO+ (1-0), and HNC (1-0), for a sample of 58 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). By combining our new IRAM data with literature data and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, we study the correspondence between these putative tracers of dense gas and the relative contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation to the mid-infrared luminosity of each system. We find the HCN (1-0) emission to be enhanced in AGN-dominated systems ($\langle$L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}\rangle=1.84$), compared to composite and starburst-dominated systems ($\langle$L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}\rangle=1.14$, and 0.88, respectively). However, some composite and starburst systems have L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}$ ratios comparable to those of AGN, indicating that enhanced HCN emission is not uniquely associated with energetically dominant AGN. After removing AGN-dominated systems from the sample, we find a linear relationship (within the uncertainties) between $\log_{10}$(L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$) and $\log_{10}$(L$_{IR}$), consistent with most previous findings. L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L$_{IR}$, typically interpreted as the dense gas depletion time, appears to have no systematic trend with L$_{IR}$ for our sample of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and has significant scatter. The galaxy-integrated HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) emission do not appear to have a simple interpretation, in terms of the AGN dominance or the star formation rate, and are likely determined by multiple processes, including density and radiative effects.
  • Aims. We probe the physical conditions in the core of Arp 299A and try to put constraints to the nature of its nuclear power source. Methods. We used Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared and submillimeter observations of H2O and OH rotational lines in Arp 299A to create a multi-component model of the galaxy. In doing this, we employed a spherically symmetric radiative transfer code. Results. Nine H2O lines in absorption and eight in emission as well as four OH doublets in absorption and one in emission, are detected in Arp 299A. No lines of the 18O isotopologues, which have been seen in compact obscured nuclei of other galaxies, are detected. The absorption in the ground state OH doublet at 119 {\mu}m is found redshifted by ~175 km/s compared to other OH and H2O lines, suggesting a low excitation inflow. We find that at least two components are required in order to account for the excited molecular line spectrum. The inner component has a radius of 20-25 pc, a very high infrared surface brightness (> 3e13 Lsun/kpc^2), warm dust (Td > 90 K), and a large H2 column density (NH2 > 1e24 cm^-2). The outer component is larger (50-100 pc) with slightly cooler dust (70-90 K). In addition, a much more extended inflowing component is required to also account for the OH doublet at 119 {\mu}m. Conclusions. The Compton-thick nature of the core makes it difficult to determine the nature of the buried power source, but the high surface brightness indicates that it is either an active galactic nucleus and/or a dense nuclear starburst. The high OH/H2O ratio in the nucleus indicates that ion-neutral chemistry induced by X-rays or cosmic-rays is important. Finally we find a lower limit to the 16O/18O ratio of 400 in the nuclear region, possibly indicating that the nuclear starburst is in an early evolutionary stage, or that it is fed through a molecular inflow of, at most, solar metallicity.
  • We report the detection of OH+ and H2O+ in the z=0.89 absorber toward the lensed quasar PKS1830-211. The abundance ratio of OH+ and H2O+ is used to quantify the molecular hydrogen fraction (fH2) and the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen (zH) along two lines of sight, located at ~2 kpc and ~4 kpc to either side of the absorber's center. The molecular fraction decreases outwards, from ~0.04 to ~0.02, comparable to values measured in the Milky Way at similar galactocentric radii. For zH, we find values of ~2x10^-14 s^-1 and ~3x10^-15 s^-1, respectively, which are slightly higher than in the Milky Way at comparable galactocentric radii, possibly due to a higher average star formation activity in the z=0.89 absorber. The ALMA observations of OH+, H2O+, and other hydrides toward PKS1830-211 reveal the multi-phase composition of the absorbing gas. Taking the column density ratios along the southwest and northeast lines of sight as a proxy of molecular fraction, we classify the species ArH+, OH+, H2Cl+, H2O+, CH, and HF as tracing gases increasingly more molecular. Incidentally, our data allow us to improve the accuracy of H2O+ rest frequencies and thus refine the spectroscopic parameters.
  • Observations of the molecular gas over scales of 0.5 to several kpc provide crucial information on how gas moves through galaxies, especially in mergers and interacting systems, where it ultimately reaches the galaxy center, accumulates, and feeds nuclear activity. Studying the processes involved in the gas transport is an important step forward to understand galaxy evolution. 12CO, 13CO and C18O1-0 high-sensitivity ALMA observations were used to assess properties of the large-scale molecular gas reservoir and its connection to the circumnuclear molecular ring in NGC1614. The role of excitation and abundances were studied in this context. Spatial distributions of the 12CO and 13CO emission show significant differences. 12CO traces the large-scale molecular gas reservoir, associated with a dust lane that harbors infalling gas. 13CO emission is - for the first time - detected in the large-scale dust lane. Its emission peaks between dust lane and circumnuclear molecular ring. A 12CO-to-13CO1-0 intensity ratio map shows high values in the ring region (~30) typical for the centers of luminous galaxy mergers and even more extreme values in the dust lane (>45). This drop in ratio is consistent with molecular gas in the dust lane being in a diffuse, unbound state while being funneled towards the nucleus. We find a high 16O-to-18O abundance ratio in the starburst region (>900), typical of quiescent disk gas - by now, the starburst is expected to have enriched the nuclear ISM in 18O relative to 16O. The massive inflow of gas may be partially responsible for the low 18O/16O abundance since it will dilute the starburst enrichment with unprocessed gas from greater radii. The 12CO-to-13CO abundance is consistent with this scenario. It suggests that the nucleus of NGC1614 is in a transient phase of evolution where starburst and nuclear growth are fuelled by returning gas from the minor merger event.
  • We analyse new observations with the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope, and archival data from the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We model the spatially resolved radio spectrum of Arp 220 from 150 MHz to 33 GHz. We present an image of Arp 220 at 150 MHz with resolution $0.65''\times0.35''$, sensitivity 0.15 mJy beam$^{-1}$, and integrated flux density $394\pm59$ mJy. More than 80% of the detected flux comes from extended ($6''\approx$2.2 kpc) steep spectrum ($\alpha=-0.7$) emission, likely from star formation in the molecular disk surrounding the two nuclei. We find elongated features extending $0.3''$ (110 pc) and $0.9''$ (330 pc) from the eastern and western nucleus respectively, which we interpret as evidence for outflows. The extent of radio emission requires acceleration of cosmic rays far outside the nuclei. We find that a simple three component model can explain most of the observed radio spectrum of the galaxy. When accounting for absorption at 1.4 GHz, Arp 220 follows the FIR/radio correlation with $q=2.36$, and we estimate a star formation rate of 220 M$_\odot\text{yr}^{-1}$. We derive thermal fractions at 1 GHz of less than 1% for the nuclei, which indicates that a major part of the UV-photons are absorbed by dust. International LOFAR observations shows great promise to detect steep spectrum outflows and probe regions of thermal absorption. However, in LIRGs the emission detected at 150 MHz does not necessarily come from the main regions of star formation. This implies that high spatial resolution is crucial for accurate estimates of star formation rates for such galaxies at 150 MHz.
  • We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of the CO(6-5) molecular line and the 432 {\mu}m continuum emission from the 300 pc-sized circumnuclear disk (CND) of the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with a spatial resolution of ~4 pc. These observations spatially resolve the CND and, for the first time, image the dust emission, the molecular gas distribution, and the kinematics from a 7-10 pc-diameter disk that represents the submillimeter counterpart of the putative torus of NGC 1068. We fitted the nuclear spectral energy distribution of the torus using ALMA and near and mid-infrared (NIR/MIR) data with CLUMPY models. The mass and radius of the best-fit solution for the torus are both consistent with the values derived from the ALMA data alone: Mgas_torus=(1+-0.3)x10^5 Msun and Rtorus=3.5+-0.5 pc. The dynamics of the molecular gas in the torus show non-circular motions and enhanced turbulence superposed on the rotating pattern of the disk. The kinematic major axis of the CO torus is tilted relative to its morphological major axis. By contrast with the nearly edge-on orientation of the H2O megamaser disk, we have found evidence suggesting that the molecular torus is less inclined (i=34deg-66deg) at larger radii. The lopsided morphology and complex kinematics of the torus could be the signature of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, long predicted to likely drive the dynamical evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) tori.
  • With high resolution (0."25 x 0."18) ALMA CO 3-2 observations of the nearby (D=21 Mpc, 1"=102 pc), extremely radio-quiet galaxy NGC1377, we have discovered a high-velocity, very collimated nuclear outflow which we interpret as a molecular jet with a projected length of +-150 pc. Along the jet axis we find strong velocity reversals where the projected velocity swings from -150 km/s to +150 km/s. A simple model of a molecular jet precessing around an axis close to the plane of the sky can reproduce the observations. The velocity of the outflowing gas is difficult to constrain due to the velocity reversals but we estimate it to be between 240 and 850 km/s and the jet to precess with a period P=0.3-1.1 Myr. The CO emission is clumpy along the jet and the total molecular mass in the high-velocity (+-(60 to 150 km/s)) gas lies between 2e6 Msun (light jet) and 2e7 Msun (massive jet). There is also CO emission extending along the minor axis of NGC1377. It holds >40% of the flux in NGC1377 and may be a slower, wide-angle molecular outflow which is partially entrained by the molecular jet. We discuss the driving mechanism of the molecular jet and suggest that it is either powered by a very faint radio jet or by an accretion disk-wind similar to those found towards protostars. The nucleus of NGC1377 harbours intense embedded activity and we detect emission from vibrationally excited HCN J=4-3 v_2=1f which is consistent with hot gas and dust. We find large columns of H2 in the centre of NGC1377 which may be a sign of a high rate of recent gas infall. The dynamical age of the molecular jet is short (<1 Myr), which could imply that it is young and consistent with the notion that NGC1377 is caught in a transient phase of its evolution. However, further studies are required to determine the age of the molecular jet, its mass and the role it is playing in the growth of the nucleus of NGC1377.
  • We explore the potential of imaging vibrationally excited molecular emission at high angular resolution to better understand the morphology and physical structure of the dense gas in Arp~220 and to gain insight into the nature of the nuclear powering sources. Vibrationally excited emission of HCN is detected in both nuclei with a very high ratio relative to the total $L_{FIR}$, higher than in any other observed galaxy and well above what is observed in Galactic hot cores. HCN $v_2=1f$ is observed to be marginally resolved in $\sim60\times50$~pc regions inside the dusty $\sim100$~pc sized nuclear cores. Its emission is centered on our derived individual nuclear velocities based on HCO$^+$ emission ($V_{WN}=5342\pm4$ and $V_{EN}=5454\pm8$~\kms, for the western and eastern nucleus, respectively). With virial masses within $r\sim25-30$~pc based on the HCN~$v_2=1f$ line widths, we estimate gas surface densities (gas fraction $f_g=0.1$) of $3\pm0.3\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (WN) and $1.1\pm0.1\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (EN). The $4-3/3-2$ flux density ratio could be consistent with optically thick emission, which would further constrain the size of the emitting region to $>15$~pc (EN) and $>22$~pc (WN). The absorption systems that may hide up to $70\%$ of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission are found at velocities of $-50$~\kms~(EN) and $6$, $-140$, and $-575$~\kms (WN) relative to velocities of the nuclei. Blueshifted absorptions are the evidence of outflowing motions from both nuclei. The bright vibrational emission implies the existence of a hot dust region radiatively pumping these transitions. We find evidence of a strong temperature gradient that would be responsible for both the HCN $v_2$ pumping and the absorbed profiles from the vibrational ground state as a result of both continuum and self-absorption by cooler foreground gas.
  • Aims: Our goal is to study the chemical composition of the outflows of active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies. Methods: We obtained high-resolution interferometric observations of HCN and HCO$^+$ $J=1\rightarrow0$ and $J=2\rightarrow1$ of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Mrk~231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We also use previously published observations of HCN and HCO$^+$ $J=1\rightarrow0$ and $J=3\rightarrow2$, and HNC $J=1\rightarrow0$ in the same source. Results: In the line wings of the HCN, HCO$^+$, and HNC emission, we find that these three molecular species exhibit features at distinct velocities which differ between the species. The features are not consistent with emission lines of other molecular species. Through radiative transfer modelling of the HCN and HCO$^+$ outflow emission we find an average abundance ratio $X(\mathrm{HCN})/X(\mathrm{HCO}^+)\gtrsim1000$. Assuming a clumpy outflow, modelling of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission produces strongly inconsistent outflow masses. Conclusions: Both the anti-correlated outflow features of HCN and HCO$^+$ and the different outflow masses calculated from the radiative transfer models of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission suggest that the outflow is chemically differentiated. The separation between HCN and HCO$^+$ could be an indicator of shock fronts present in the outflow, since the HCN/HCO$^+$ ratio is expected to be elevated in shocked regions. Our result shows that studies of the chemistry in large-scale galactic outflows can be used to better understand the physical properties of these outflows and their effects on the interstellar medium (ISM) in the galaxy.
  • We present high resolution (0."4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS17208-0014, Arp220, IC860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited ($\nu_2$=1) J=3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r<17-70 pc) nuclei that have very high implied mid-infrared surface brightness $>$$5\times 10^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, $\nu_2$=1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 micron mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses, and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H$_2$ column densities exceed $10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, we show strong evidence that the ground vibrational state ($\nu$=0), J=3-2 and 4-3 rotational lines of HCN and HCO$^+$ fail to probe the highly enshrouded, compact nuclear regions owing to strong self- and continuum absorption. The HCN and HCO$^+$ line profiles are double-peaked because of the absorption and show evidence of non-circular motions - possibly in the form of in- or outflows. Detections of vibrationally excited HCN in external galaxies are so far limited to ULIRGs and early-type spiral LIRGs, and we discuss possible causes for this. We tentatively suggest that the peak of vibrationally excited HCN emission is connected to a rapid stage of nuclear growth, before the phase of strong feedback.
  • We obtained an ALMA Cycle 0 spectral scan of the dusty LIRG NGC 4418, spanning a total of 70.7 GHz in bands 3, 6, and 7. We use a combined local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE (NLTE) fit of the spectrum in order to identify the molecular species and derive column densities and excitation temperatures. We derive molecular abundances and compare them with other Galactic and extragalactic sources by means of a principal component analysis. We detect 317 emission lines from a total of 45 molecular species, including 15 isotopic substitutions and six vibrationally excited variants. Our LTE/NLTE fit find kinetic temperatures from 20 to 350 K, and densities between 10$^5$ and 10$^7$ cm$^{-3}$. The spectrum is dominated by vibrationally excited HC$_3$N, HCN, and HNC, with vibrational temperatures from 300 to 450 K. We find high abundances of HC$_3$N, SiO, H$_2$S, and c-HCCCH and a low CH$_3$OH abundance. A principal component analysis shows that NGC 4418 and Arp 220 share very similar molecular abundances and excitation, which clearly set them apart from other Galactic and extragalactic environments. The similar molecular abundances observed towards NCG 4418 and Arp 220 are consistent with a hot gas-phase chemistry, with the relative abundances of SiO and CH$_3$OH being regulated by shocks and X-ray driven dissociation. The bright emission from vibrationally excited species confirms the presence of a compact IR source, with an effective diameter $<$5 pc and brightness temperatures $>$350 K. The molecular abundances and the vibrationally excited spectrum are consistent with a young AGN/starburst system. We suggest that NGC 4418 may be a template for a new kind of chemistry and excitation, typical of compact obscured nuclei (CON). Because of the narrow line widths and bright molecular emission, NGC 4418 is the ideal target for further studies of the chemistry in CONs.
  • Galaxy evolution scenarios predict that the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity (AGN) can drive the transformation of gas-rich spiral mergers into ULIRGs, and, eventually, lead to the build-up of QSO/elliptical hosts. We study the role that star formation and AGN feedback have in launching and maintaining the molecular outflows in two starburst-dominated advanced mergers, NGC1614 and IRAS17208-0014, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of their molecular gas reservoirs. We have used the PdBI array to image with high spatial resolution (0.5"-1.2") the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) line emissions in NGC1614 and IRAS17208-0014, respectively. The velocity fields of the gas are analyzed and modeled to find the evidence of molecular outflows in these sources and characterize the mass, momentum and energy of these components. While most (>95%) of the CO emission stems from spatially-resolved (~2-3kpc-diameter) rotating disks, we also detect in both mergers the emission from high-velocity line wings that extend up to +-500-700km/s, well beyond the estimated virial range associated with rotation and turbulence. The kinematic major axis of the line wing emission is tilted by ~90deg in NGC1614 and by ~180deg in IRAS17208-0014 relative to their respective rotating disk major axes. These results can be explained by the existence of non-coplanar molecular outflows in both systems. In stark contrast with NGC1614, where star formation alone can drive its molecular outflow, the mass, energy and momentum budget requirements of the molecular outflow in IRAS17208-0014 can be best accounted for by the existence of a so far undetected (hidden) AGN of L_AGN~7x10^11 L_sun. The geometry of the molecular outflow in IRAS17208-0014 suggests that the outflow is launched by a non-coplanar disk that may be associated with a buried AGN in the western nucleus.