• We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum observations of the SR 24S transition disk with an angular resolution $\lesssim0.18"$ (12 au radius). We perform a multi-wavelength investigation by combining new data with previous ALMA data at 0.45 mm. The visibilities and images of the continuum emission at the two wavelengths are well characterized by a ring-like emission. Visibility modeling finds that the ring-like emission is narrower at longer wavelengths, in good agreement with models of dust trapping in pressure bumps, although there are complex residuals that suggest potentially asymmetric structures. The 0.45 mm emission has a shallower profile inside the central cavity than the 1.3 mm emission. In addition, we find that the $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (J=2-1) emission peaks at the center of the continuum cavity. We do not detect either continuum or gas emission from the northern companion to this system (SR 24N), which is itself a binary system. The upper limit for the dust disk mass of SR 24N is $\lesssim 0.12\,M_{\bigoplus}$, which gives a disk mass ratio in dust between the two components of $M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24S}}/M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24N}}\gtrsim840$. The current ALMA observations may imply that either planets have already formed in the SR 24N disk or that dust growth to mm-sizes is inhibited there and that only warm gas, as seen by ro-vibrational CO emission inside the truncation radii of the binary, is present.
  • Scattered light images of transition discs in the near-infrared often show non-axisymmetric structures in the form of wide-open spiral arms in addition to their characteristic low-opacity inner gap region. We study self-gravitating discs and investigate the influence of gravitational instability on the shape and contrast of spiral arms induced by planet-disc interactions. Two-dimensional non-isothermal hydrodynamical simulations including viscous heating and a cooling prescription are combined with three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer models for direct comparison to observations. We find that the resulting contrast between the spirals and the surrounding disc in scattered light is by far higher for pressure scale height variations, i.e. thermal perturbations, than for pure surface density variations. Self-gravity effects suppress any vortex modes and tend to reduce the opening angle of planet-induced spirals, making them more tightly wound. If the disc is only marginally gravitationally stable with a Toomre parameter around unity, an embedded massive planet (planet-to-star mass ratio of $10^{-2}$) can trigger gravitational instability in the outer disc. The spirals created by this instability and the density waves launched by the planet can overlap resulting in large-scale, more open spiral arms in the outer disc. The contrast of these spirals is well above the detection limit of current telescopes.
  • Transition disks have dust-depleted inner regions and may represent an intermediate step of an on-going disk dispersal process, where planet formation is probably in progress. Recent millimetre observations of transition disks reveal radially and azimuthally asymmetric structures, where micron- and millimetre-sized dust particles may not spatially coexist. These properties can be the result of particle trapping and grain growth in pressure bumps originating from the disk interaction with a planetary companion. The multiple features observed in some transition disks, such as SR 21, suggest the presence of more than one planet. We study the gas and dust distributions of a disk hosting two massive planets as function of different disk and dust parameters. Observational signatures, such as the spectral energy distribution, sub-millimetre, and polarised images are simulated for the various parameters. We confirm that planets can lead to particle trapping, although for a disk with high viscosity ($\alpha_{\rm{turb}}=10^{-2}$), the planet should be more massive than $5 M_{\rm{Jup}}$ and dust fragmentation should occur with low efficiency ($v_{f}\sim30\rm{m s}^{-1}$). This will lead to a ring-like feature as observed in transition disks in the millimetre. When trapping occurs, we find that a smooth distribution of micron sized grains throughout the disk, sometimes observed in scattered light, can only happen if the combination of planet mass and turbulence is such that small grains are not fully filtered out. A high disk viscosity ($\alpha_{\rm{turb}}=10^{-2}$) ensures a replenishment of the cavity in micron-sized dust, while for lower viscosity ($\alpha_{\rm{turb}}=10^{-3}$), the planet mass is constrained to be less than $5 M_{\rm{Jup}}$. In these cases, the gas distribution is likely to show low-amplitude azimuthal asymmetries caused by disk eccentricity rather than by long-lived vortices.
  • Context: Anticyclonic vortices are considered as a favourable places for trapping dust and forming planetary embryos. On the other hand, they are massive blobs that can interact gravitationally with the planets in the disc. Aims: We aim to study how a vortex interacts gravitationally with a planet which migrates toward it or a planet which is created inside the vortex. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a viscous locally isothermal disc using GFARGO and FARGO-ADSG. We set a stationary Gaussian pressure bump in the disc in a way that RWI is triggered. After a large vortex is established, we implanted a low mass planet in the outer disc or inside the vortex and allowed it to migrate. We also examined the effect of vortex strength on the planet migration and checked the validity of the final result in the presence of self-gravity. Results: We noticed regardless of the planet's initial position, the planet is finally locked to the vortex or its migration is stopped in a farther orbital distance in case of a stronger vortex. For the model with the weaker vortex, we studied the effect of different parameters such as background viscosity, background surface density, mass of the planet and different planet positions. In these models, while the trapping time and locking angle of the planet vary for different parameters, the main result, which is the planet-vortex locking, remains valid. We discovered that even a planet with a mass less than 5 * 10^{-7} M_{\star} comes out from the vortex and is locked to it at the same orbital distance. For a stronger vortex, both in non-self-gravitated and self-gravitating models, the planet migration is stopped far away from the radial position of the vortex. This effect can make the vortices a suitable place for continual planet formation under the condition that they save their shape during the planetary growth.
  • In this paper the migration of a 10 Earth-mass planetary core is investigated at the outer boundary of the dead zone of a protoplanetary disc by means of 2D hydrodynamic simulations done with the graphics processor unit version of the FARGO code. In the dead zone, the effective viscosity is greatly reduced due to the disc self-shielding against stellar UV radiation, X-rays from the stellar magnetosphere and interstellar cosmic rays. As a consequence, mass accumulation occurs near the outer dead zone edge, which is assumed to trap planetary cores enhancing the efficiency of the core-accretion scenario to form giant planets. Contrary to the perfect trapping of planetary cores in 1D models, our 2D numerical simulations show that the trapping effect is greatly dependent on the width of the region where viscosity reduction is taking place. Planet trapping happens exclusively if the viscosity reduction is sharp enough to allow the development of large-scale vortices due to the Rossby wave instability. The trapping is only temporarily, and its duration is inversely proportional to the width of the viscosity transition. However, if the Rossby wave instability is not excited, a ring-like axisymmetric density jump forms, which cannot trap the 10 Earth-mass planetary cores. We revealed that the stellar torque exerted on the planet plays an important role in the migration history as the barycentre of the system significantly shifts away from the star due to highly non-axisymmetric density distribution of the disc. Our results still support the idea of planet formation at density/pressure maximum, since the migration of cores is considerably slowed down enabling them further growth and runaway gas accretion in the vicinity of an overdense region.
  • Context. Transition disks typically appear in resolved millimeter observations as giant dust rings surrounding their young host stars. More accurate observations with ALMA have shown several of these rings to be in fact asymmetric: they have lopsided shapes. It has been speculated that these rings act as dust traps, which would make them important laboratories for studying planet formation. It has been shown that an elongated giant vortex produced in a disk with a strong viscosity jump strikingly resembles the observed asymmetric rings. Aims. We aim to study a similar behavior for a disk in which a giant planet is embedded. However, a giant planet can induce two kinds of asymmetries: (1) a giant vortex, and (2) an eccentric disk. We studied under which conditions each of these can appear, and how one can observationally distinguish between them. This is important because only a vortex can trap particles both radially and azimuthally, while the eccentric ring can only trap particles in radial direction. Methods. We used the FARGO code to conduct the hydro-simulations. We set up a disk with an embedded giant planet and took a radial grid spanning from 0.1 to 7 times the planet semi-major axis. We ran the simulations with various viscosity values and planet masses for 1000 planet orbits to allow a fully developed vortex or disk eccentricity. Afterwards, we compared the dust distribution in a vortex-holding disk with an eccentric disk using dust simulations. Results. We find that vorticity and eccentricity are distinguishable by looking at the azimuthal contrast of the dust density. While vortices, as particle traps, produce very pronounced azimuthal asymmetries, eccentric features are not able to accumulate millimeter dust particles in azimuthal direction, and therefore the asymmetries are expected to be modest.