• It is well known that massive stars (M > 8 M_sun) evolve up to the collapse of the stellar core, resulting in most cases as a supernova (SN) explosion. Their heterogeneity is related mainly to different configurations of the progenitor star at the moment of the explosion, and to their immediate environments. We present photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2010bt, which was classified as a Type IIn SN from a spectrum obtained soon after discovery and was observed extensively for about two months. After the seasonal interruption owing to its proximity to the Sun, the SN was below the detection threshold, indicative of a rapid luminosity decline. We can identify the likely progenitor with a very luminous star (log L/L_sun ~ 7) through comparison of Hubble Space Telescope images of the host galaxy prior to explosion with those of the SN obtained after maximum light. Such a luminosity is not expected for a quiescent star, but rather for a massive star in an active phase. This progenitor candidate was later confirmed via images taken in 2015 (~ 5 yr post-discovery), in which no bright point source was detected at the SN position. Given these results and the SN behavior, we conclude that SN 2010bt was likely a Type IIn SN and that its progenitor was a massive star that experienced an outburst shortly before the final explosion, leading to a dense H-rich circumstellar environment around the SN progenitor.
  • We present results of the photometric (from 3 to 509 days past explosion) and spectroscopic (up to 230 days past explosion) monitoring campaign of the He-rich Type IIb supernova (SN) 2015as. The {\it (B-V)} colour evolution of SN 2015as closely resemble those of SN 2008ax, suggesting that SN 2015as belongs to the SN IIb subgroup that does not show the early, short-duration photometric peak. The light curve of SN 2015as reaches the $B$-band maximum about 22 days after the explosion, at an absolute magnitude of -16.82 $\pm$ 0.18 mag. At $\sim$ 75 days after the explosion, its spectrum transitions from that of a SN II to a SN Ib. P~Cygni features due to He I lines appear at around 30 days after explosion, indicating that the progenitor of SN 2015as was partially stripped. For SN~2015as, we estimate a $^{56}$Ni mass of $\sim$ 0.08 M$_{\odot}$ and ejecta mass of 1.1--2.2 M$_{\odot}$, which are similar to the values inferred for SN 2008ax. The quasi bolometric analytical light curve modelling suggests that the progenitor of SN 2015as has a modest mass ($\sim$ 0.1 M$_{\odot}$), a nearly-compact ($\sim$ 0.05$\times$10$^{13}$ cm) H envelope on top of a dense, compact ($\sim$ 2$\times$10$^{11}$ cm) and a more massive ($\sim$ 1.2 M$_{\odot}$) He core. The analysis of the nebular phase spectra indicates that $\sim$ 0.44 M$_{\odot}$ of O is ejected in the explosion. The intensity ratio of the [Ca II]/[O I] nebular lines favours either a main sequence progenitor mass of $\sim$ 15 M$_{\odot}$ or a Wolf Rayet star of 20 M$_{\odot}$.
  • We report the results of our follow-up campaign of the peculiar supernova ASASSN-15no, based on optical data covering ~300 days of its evolution. Initially the spectra show a pure blackbody continuum. After few days, the HeI 5876 A transition appears with a P-Cygni profile and an expansion velocity of about 8700 km/s. Fifty days after maximum, the spectrum shows signs typically seen in interacting supernovae. A broad (FWHM~8000 km/s) Halpha becomes more prominent with time until ~150 days after maximum and quickly declines later on. At these phases Halpha starts to show an intermediate component, which together with the blue pseudo-continuum are clues that the ejecta begin to interact with the CSM. The spectra at the latest phases look very similar to the nebular spectra of stripped-envelope SNe. The early part (the first 40 days after maximum) of the bolometric curve, which peaks at a luminosity intermediate between normal and superluminous supernovae, is well reproduced by a model in which the energy budget is essentially coming from ejecta recombination and 56Ni decay. From the model we infer a mass of the ejecta Mej = 2.6 Msun; an initial radius of the photosphere R0 = 2.1 x 10^14 cm; and an explosion energy Eexpl = 0.8 x 10^51 erg. A possible scenario involves a massive and extended H-poor shell lost by the progenitor star a few years before explosion. The shell is hit, heated and accelerated by the supernova ejecta. The accelerated shell+ejecta rapidly dilutes, unveiling the unperturbed supernova spectrum below. The outer ejecta start to interact with a H-poor external CSM lost by the progenitor system about 9 -- 90 years before the explosion.
  • SNhunt151 was initially classified as a supernova (SN) impostor (nonterminal outburst of a massive star). It exhibited a slow increase in luminosity, lasting about 450 d, followed by a major brightening that reaches M_V ~ -18 mag. No source is detected to M_V > -13 mag in archival images at the position of SNhunt151 before the slow rise. Low-to-mid-resolution optical spectra obtained during the pronounced brightening show very little evolution, being dominated at all times by multicomponent Balmer emission lines, a signature of interaction between the material ejected in the new outburst and the pre-existing circumstellar medium. We also analyzed mid-infrared images from the Spitzer Space Telescope, detecting a source at the transient position in 2014 and 2015. Overall, SNhunt151 is spectroscopically a Type IIn SN, somewhat similar to SN2009ip. However, there are also some differences, such as a slow pre-discovery rise, a relatively broad light-curve peak showing a longer rise time (~ 50 d) and a slower decline, along with a negligible change in the temperature around the peak (T < 10^4 K). We suggest that SNhunt151 is the result of an outburst, or a SN explosion, within a dense circumstellar nebula, similar to those embedding some luminous blue variables like Eta Carinae and originating from past mass-loss events.
  • We present two hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), namely SN2013hx and PS15br. These objects, together with SN2008es are the only SLSNe showing a distinct, broad Halpha feature during the photospheric phase and also do not show any sign of strong interaction between fast-moving ejecta and circumstellar shells in their early spectra. Despite PS15br peak luminosity is fainter than the other two objects, the spectrophotometric evolution is similar to SN2013hx and different than any other supernova in a similar luminosity space. We group all of them as SLSNe II and hence distinct from the known class of SLSN IIn. Both transients show a strong, multi-component Halpha emission after 200 days past maximum which we interpret as an indication of interaction of the ejecta with an asymmetric, clumpy circumstellar material. The spectra and photometric evolution of the two objects are similar to type II supernovae, although they have much higher luminosity and evolve on slower timescales. This is qualitatively similar to how SLSNe I compare with normal type Ic in that the former are brighter and evolve more slowly. We apply a magnetar and an interaction semi-analytical codes to fit the light curves of our two objects and SN2008es. The overall observational dataset would tend to favour the magnetar, or central engine, model as the source of the peak luminosity although the clear signature of late-time interaction indicates that interaction can play a role in the luminosity evolution of SLSNe II at some phases.
  • We describe the observing strategy, data reduction tools and early results of a supernova (SN) search project, named SUDARE, conducted with the ESO VST telescope aimed at measuring the rate of the different types of SNe in the redshift range 0.2<z<0.8. The search was performed in two of the best-studied extragalactic fields, CDFS and COSMOS, for which a wealth of ancillary data are available in the literature or public archives. (abridged) We obtained a final sample of 117 SNe, most of which are SNIa (57%) and the remaining core collapse events of which 44% type II, 22% type IIn and 34% type Ib/c. In order to link the transients, we built a catalog of ~1.3x10^5 galaxies in the redshift range 0<z<1 with a limiting magnitude K_AB=23.5 mag. We measured the SN rate per unit volume for SN Ia and core collapse SNe in different bin of redshifts. The values are consistent with other measurements from the literature. The dispersion of the rate measurements for SNe Ia is comparable with the scatter of the theoretical tracks for single (SD) and double degenerate (DD) binary systems models, therefore the data do not allow to disentangle among the two different progenitor scenarios. However, we may notice that among the three tested models, SD and two flavours of DD, either with a steep (DDC) or a wide (DDW) delay time distribution, the SD gives a better fit across the whole redshift range whereas the DDC better matches the steep rise up to redshift ~1.2. The DDW appears instead less favoured. The core collapse SN rate is fully consistent, unlike recent claims, with the prediction based on recent estimates of the star formation history, and standard progenitor mass range.
  • The merger of two neutron stars is predicted to give rise to three major detectable phenomena: a short burst of gamma-rays, a gravitational wave signal, and a transient optical/near-infrared source powered by the synthesis of large amounts of very heavy elements via rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Such transients, named "macronovae" or "kilonovae", are believed to be centres of production of rare elements such as gold and platinum. The most compelling evidence so far for a kilonova was a very faint near-infrared rebrightening in the afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst at z = 0.356, although findings indicating bluer events have been reported. Here we report the spectral identification and describe the physical properties of a bright kilonova associated with the gravitational wave source GW 170817 and gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A associated with a galaxy at a distance of 40 Mpc from Earth. Using a series of spectra from ground-based observatories covering the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared, we find that the kilonova is characterized by rapidly expanding ejecta with spectral features similar to those predicted by current models. The ejecta is optically thick early on, with a velocity of about 0.2 times light speed, and reaches a radius of about 50 astronomical units in only 1.5 days. As the ejecta expands, broad absorption-like lines appear on the spectral continuum indicating atomic species produced by nucleosynthesis that occurs in the post-merger fast-moving dynamical ejecta and in two slower (0.05 times light speed) wind regions. Comparison with spectral models suggests that the merger ejected 0.03-0.05 solar masses of material, including high-opacity lanthanides.
  • We report the results of deep optical follow-up surveys of the first two gravitational-wave sources, GW150914 and GW151226, done by the GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm Collaboration (GRAWITA). The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) responded promptly to the gravitational-wave alerts sent by the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations, monitoring a region of $90$ deg$^2$ and $72$ deg$^2$ for GW150914 and GW151226, respectively, and repeated the observations over nearly two months. Both surveys reached an average limiting magnitude of about 21 in the $r-$band. The paper describes the VST observational strategy and two independent procedures developed to search for transient counterpart candidates in multi-epoch VST images. Several transients have been discovered but no candidates are recognized to be related to the gravitational-wave events. Interestingly, among many contaminant supernovae, we find a possible correlation between the supernova VSTJ57.77559-59.13990 and GRB150827A detected by {\it Fermi}-GBM. The detection efficiency of VST observations for different types of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave events are evaluated for the present and future follow-up surveys.
  • We present our study of OGLE-2014-SN-073, one of the brightest Type II SN ever discovered, with an unusually broad lightcurve combined with high ejecta velocities. From our hydrodynamical modelling we infer a remarkable ejecta mass of $60^{+42}_{-16}$~M$_\odot$, and a relatively high explosion energy of $12.4^{+13.0}_{-5.9} \times10^{51}$~erg. We show that this object belongs, with a very small number of other hydrogen-rich SNe, to an energy regime that is not explained by standard core-collapse (CC) neutrino-driven explosions. We compare the quantities inferred by the hydrodynamical modelling with the expectations of various exploding scenarios, trying to explain the high energy and luminosity released. We find some qualitative similarities with pair-instabilities SNe, although a prompt injection of energy by a magnetar seems also a viable alternative to explain such extreme event.
  • We present an analysis of ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared observations of the fast-declining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2007on and 2011iv, hosted by the Fornax cluster member NGC 1404. The B-band light curves of SN 2007on and SN 2011iv are characterised by dm_15(B) decline-rate values of 1.96 mag and 1.77 mag, respectively. Although they have similar decline rates, their peak B- and H-band magnitudes differ by ~0.60 mag and ~0.35 mag, respectively. After correcting for the luminosity vs. decline rate and the luminosity vs. colour relations, the peak B-band and H-band light curves provide distances that differ by ~14% and ~9%, respectively. These findings serve as a cautionary tale for the use of transitional SNe Ia located in early-type hosts in the quest to measure cosmological parameters. Interestingly, even though SN 2011iv is brighter and bluer at early times, by three weeks past maximum and extending over several months, its B-V colour is 0.12 mag redder than that of SN 2007on. To reconcile this unusual behaviour, we turn to guidance from a suite of spherical one-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation explosion models. In this context, 56Ni production depends on both the so-called transition density and the central density of the progenitor white dwarf. To first order, the transition density drives the luminosity-width relation, while the central density is an important second-order parameter. Within this context, the differences in the B-V color evolution along the Lira regime suggests the progenitor of SN~2011iv had a higher central density than SN~2007on.
  • We present the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the type Ic supernova LSQ14efd, discovered by the La Silla QUEST survey and followed by PESSTO. LSQ14efd was discovered few days after explosion and the observations cover up to ~100 days. The early photometric points show the signature of the cooling of the shock break-out event experienced by the progenitor at the time of the supernova explosion, one of the first for a type Ic supernova. A comparison with type Ic supernova spectra shows that LSQ14efd is quite similar to the type Ic SN 2004aw. These two supernovae have kinetic energies that are intermediate between standard Ic explosions and those which are the most energetic explosions known (e.g. SN 1998bw). We computed an analytical model for the light-curve peak and estimated the mass of the ejecta 6.3 +/- 0.5 Msun, a synthesized nickel mass of 0.25 Msun and a kinetic energy of Ekin = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10^51 erg. No connection between LSQ14efd and a GRB event could be established. However we point out that the supernova shows some spectroscopic similarities with the peculiar SN-Ia 1999ac and the SN-Iax SN 2008A. A core-collapse origin is most probable considering the spectroscopic, photometric evolution and the detection of the cooling of the shock break-out.
  • Supernova (SN) 2016bdu is an unusual transient resembling SN 2009ip. SN 2009ip-like events are characterized by a long-lasting phase of erratic variability which ends with two luminous outbursts a few weeks apart. The second outburst is significantly more luminous (about 3 mag) than the first. In the case of SN 2016bdu, the first outburst (Event A) reached an absolute magnitude M(r) ~ -15.3 mag, while the second one (Event B) occurred over one month later and reached M(r) ~ -18 mag. By inspecting archival data, a faint source at the position of SN 2016bdu is detectable several times in the past few years. We interpret these detections as signatures of a phase of erratic variability, similar to that experienced by SN 2009ip between 2008 and mid-2012, and resembling the currently observed variability of the luminous blue variable SN 2000ch in NGC 3432. Spectroscopic monitoring of SN 2016bdu during the second peak initially shows features typical of a SN IIn. One month after the Event B maximum, the spectra develop broad Balmer lines with P Cygni profiles and broad metal features. At these late phases, the spectra resemble those of a typical Type II SN. All members of this SN 2009ip-like group are remarkably similar to the Type IIn SN 2005gl. For this object, the claim of a terminal SN explosion is supported by the disappearance of the progenitor star. The similarity with SN 2005gl suggests that all members of this family may finally explode as genuine SNe, although the unequivocal detection of nucleosynthesised elements in their nebular spectra is still missing.
  • With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\Msun\, for SN 2003Z and $\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\Msun\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low-to-intermediate mass, c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars, and d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter "guiding" the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.
  • Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6x10^-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.
  • This is the second paper of a series in which we present measurements of the Supernova (SN) rates from the SUDARE survey. In this paper, we study the trend of the SN rates with the intrinsic colours, the star formation activity and the mass of the parent galaxies. We have considered a sample of about 130000 galaxies and a SN sample of about 50 events. We found that the SN Ia rate per unit mass is higher by a factor of six in the star-forming galaxies with respect to the passive galaxies. The SN Ia rate per unit mass is also higher in the less massive galaxies that are also younger. These results suggest a distribution of the delay times (DTD) less populated at long delay times than at short delays. The CC SN rate per unit mass is proportional to both the sSFR and the galaxy mass. The trends of the Type Ia and CC SN rates as a function of the sSFR and the galaxy mass that we observed from SUDARE data are in agreement with literature results at different redshifts. The expected number of SNe Ia is in agreement with the observed one for all four DTD models considered both in passive and star-forming galaxies so we can not discriminate between different progenitor scenarios. The expected number of CC SNe is higher than the observed one, suggesting a higher limit for the minimum progenitor mass. We also compare the expected and observed trends of the SN Ia rate with the intrinsic U - J colour of the parent galaxy, assumed as a tracer of the age distribution. While the slope of the relation between the SN Ia rate and the U - J color in star-forming galaxies can be reproduced well by all four DTD models considered, only the steepest of them is able to account for the rates and colour in star-forming and passive galaxies with the same value of the SN Ia production efficiency.
  • Supernova (SN) 2015bh (or SNhunt275) was discovered in NGC 2770 on 2015 February with an absolute magnitude of Mr ~ -13.4 mag, and was initially classified as a SN impostor. Here we present the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2015bh from discovery to late phases (~ 1 yr after). In addition, we inspect archival images of the host galaxy up to ~ 21 yr before discovery, finding a burst ~ 1 yr before discovery, and further signatures of stellar instability until late 2014. Later on, the luminosity of the transient slowly increases, and a broad light curve peak is reached after about three months. We propose that the transient discovered in early 2015 could be a core-collapse SN explosion. The pre-SN luminosity variability history, the long-lasting rise and faintness first light curve peak suggests that the progenitor was a very massive, unstable and blue star, which exploded as a faint SN because of severe fallback of material. Later on, the object experiences a sudden brightening of 3 mag, which results from the interaction of the SN ejecta with circumstellar material formed through repeated past mass-loss events. Spectroscopic signatures of interaction are however visible at all epochs. A similar chain of events was previously proposed for the similar interacting SN 2009ip.
  • Context: Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by $\sim2$ mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes $\lesssim-21$ are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the event were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With V_abs at peak ~-20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. It also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. We interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the CSM. If we would assume a $^{56}$Ni-powered ejecta, the bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M_sun of $^{56}$Ni and an ejected mass of ~14 M_sun. This would also imply a high kinetic energy of the explosion, ~5.4$\times10^{51}$ ergs. On the other hand, the unusually broad light curve along with the secondary peak indicate the possibility of interaction with CSM. The third alternative is the presence of a central engine releasing spin energy that eventually powers the light curve over a long time. The host of the SN is a star-forming Sa/Sb/Sbc galaxy. Conclusions: Although the spectral properties and velocity evolution of SN 2012aa are comparable to those of normal SNe Ibc, its broad light curve along with a large peak luminosity distinguish it from canonical CCSNe, suggesting the event to be an intermediate-luminosity transient between CCSNe and SLSNe at least in terms of peak luminosity. We argue that SN 2012aa belongs to a subclass where CSM interaction plays a significant role in powering the SN, at least during the initial stages of evolution.
  • We present multi-band ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionisation species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich CSM probably due to pre-explosion mass loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the $^{56}$Co decay if $\gamma$-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue-side of H$\alpha$ after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H$\alpha$ and the O I doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ~190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the Ca II, we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the O I $\lambda\lambda$6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M$_\odot$.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013ej, in galaxy M74, from 1 to 450 days after the explosion. SN 2013ej is a hydrogen-rich supernova, classified as a Type IIL due to its relatively fast decline following the initial peak. It has a relatively high peak luminosity (absolute magnitude M$_\rm{V}$ = -17.6) but a small $^{56}$Ni production of ~0.023 M$_\odot$. Its photospheric evolution is similar to other Type II SNe, with shallow absorption in the H{\alpha} profile typical for a Type IIL. During transition to the radioactive decay tail at ~100 days, we find the SN to grow bluer in B - V colour, in contrast to some other Type II supernovae. At late times, the bolometric light curve declined faster than expected from $^{56}$Co decay and we observed unusually broad and asymmetric nebular emission lines. Based on comparison of nebular emission lines most sensitive to the progenitor core mass, we find our observations are best matched to synthesized spectral models with a M$_\rm{ZAMS}$ = 12 - 15 M$_\odot$ progenitor. The derived mass range is similar to but not higher than the mass estimated for Type IIP progenitors. This is against the idea that Type IIL are from more massive stars. Observations are consistent with the SN having a progenitor with a relatively low-mass envelope.
  • High-quality collections of Type II supernova (SN) light curves are scarce because they evolve for hundreds of days, making follow-up observations time consuming and often extending over multiple observing seasons. In light of these difficulties, the diversity of SNe II is not fully understood. Here we present ultraviolet and optical photometry of 12 SNe II monitored by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) during 2013-2014, and compare them with previously studied SNe having well-sampled light curves. We explore SN II diversity by searching for correlations between the slope of the linear light-curve decay after maximum light (historically used to divide SNe II into IIL and IIP) and other measured physical properties. While SNe IIL are found to be on average more luminous than SNe IIP, SNe IIL do not appear to synthesize more 56Ni than SNe IIP. Finally, optical nebular spectra obtained for several SNe in our sample are found to be consistent with models of red supergiant progenitors in the 12-16 Msun range. Consequently, SNe IIL appear not to account for the deficit of massive red supergiants as SN II progenitors.
  • We report the results of our follow-up campaign of the supernova impostor PSN J09132750+7627410, based on optical data covering $\sim250\,\rm{d}$. From the beginning, the transient shows prominent narrow Balmer lines with P-Cygni profiles, with a blue-shifted absorption component becoming more prominent with time. Along the $\sim3\,\rm{months}$ of the spectroscopic monitoring, broad components are never detected in the hydrogen lines, suggesting that these features are produced in slowly expanding material. The transient reaches an absolute magnitude $M_r=-13.60\pm0.19\,\rm{mag}$ at maximum, a typical luminosity for supernova impostors. Amateur astronomers provided $\sim4\,\rm{years}$ of archival observations of the host galaxy, NGC 2748. The detection of the quiescent progenitor star in archival images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope suggests it to be an $18-20$\msun white-yellow supergiant.
  • We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the optical transient LSQ13zm. Historical data reveal the presence of an eruptive episode (that we label as `2013a') followed by a much brighter outburst (`2013b') three weeks later, that we argue to be the genuine supernova explosion. This sequence of events closely resemble those observed for SN2010mc and (in 2012) SN2009ip. The absolute magnitude reached by LSQ13zm during 2013a ($M_R=-14.87\pm0.25\,\rm{mag}$) is comparable with those of supernova impostors, while that of the 2013b event ($M_R=-18.46\pm0.21\,\rm{mag}$) is consistent with those of interacting supernovae. Our spectra reveal the presence of a dense and structured circumstellar medium, probably produced through numerous pre-supernova mass-loss events. In addition, we find evidence for high-velocity ejecta, with a fraction of gas expelled at more than 20000\kms. The spectra of LSQ13zm show remarkable similarity with those of well-studied core-collapse supernovae. From the analysis of the available photometric and spectroscopic data, we conclude that we first observed the last event of an eruptive sequence from a massive star, likely a Luminous Blue Variable, which a short time later exploded as a core-collapse supernova. The detailed analysis of archival images suggest that the host galaxy is a star-forming Blue Dwarf Compact Galaxy.
  • We present a comprehensive set of optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations for SN 2014ck, extending from pre-maximum to six months later. These data indicate that SN 2014ck is photometrically nearly identical to SN 2002cx, which is the prototype of the class of peculiar transients named SNe Iax. Similar to SN 2002cx, SN 2014ck reached a peak brightness $M_B=-17.37 \pm 0.15$ mag, with a post-maximum decline-rate $\Delta m_{15} (B) = 1.76 \pm 0.15$ mag. However, the spectroscopic sequence shows similarities with SN 2008ha, which was three magnitudes fainter and faster declining. In particular, SN 2014ck exhibits extremely low ejecta velocities, $\sim 3000$ km s$^{-1}$ at maximum, which are close to the value measured for SN 2008ha and half the value inferred for SN 2002cx. The bolometric light curve of SN 2014ck is consistent with the production of $0.10^{+0.04}_{-0.03} M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni. The spectral identification of several iron-peak features, in particular Co II lines in the NIR, provides a clear link to SNe Ia. Also, the detection of narrow Si, S and C features in the pre-maximum spectra suggests a thermonuclear explosion mechanism. The late-phase spectra show a complex overlap of both permitted and forbidden Fe, Ca and Co lines. The appearance of strong [Ca~II] $\lambda\lambda$7292, 7324 again mirrors the late-time spectra of SN 2008ha and SN 2002cx. The photometric resemblance to SN 2002cx and the spectral similarities to SN 2008ha highlight the peculiarity of SN 2014ck, and the complexity and heterogeneity of the SNe Iax class.
  • We present the complete set of ultra-violet, optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy for SN 2012ca, covering the period from 6~days prior to maximum light, until 531 days after maximum. The spectroscopic time series for SN 2012ca is essentially unchanged over 1.5 years, and appear to be dominated at all epochs by signatures of interaction with a dense circumstellar medium rather than the underlying supernova (SN). At late phases, we see a near infrared excess in flux which is possibly associated with dust formation, although without any signs of accompanying line shifts. SN 2012ca is a member of the set of type of the ambiguous IIn/Ia-CSM SNe, the nature of which have been debated extensively in the literature. The two leading scenarios are either a type Ia SN exploding within a dense CSM from a non-degenerate, evolved companion, or a core-collapse SN from a massive star. While some members of the population have been unequivocally associated with type Ia SNe, in other cases the association is less certain. While it is possible that SN 2012ca does arise from a thermonuclear SN, this would require a relatively high (between 20 and 70 per cent) efficiency in converting kinetic energy to optical luminosity, and a massive (~2.3-2.6 Msun) circumstellar medium. On the basis of energetics, and the results of simple modelling, we suggest that SN 2012ca is more likely associated with a core-collapse SN. This would imply that the observed set of similar SNe to SN 2012ca is in fact originated by two populations, and while these are drawn from physically distinct channels, they can have observationally similar properties.
  • We assemble a sample of 24 hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). Parameterizing the light curve shape through rise and decline timescales shows that the two are highly correlated. Magnetar-powered models can reproduce the correlation, with the diversity in rise and decline rates driven by the diffusion timescale. Circumstellar interaction models can exhibit a similar rise-decline relation, but only for a narrow range of densities, which may be problematic for these models. We find that SLSNe are approximately 3.5 magnitudes brighter and have light curves 3 times broader than SNe Ibc, but that the intrinsic shapes are similar. There are a number of SLSNe with particularly broad light curves, possibly indicating two progenitor channels, but statistical tests do not cleanly separate two populations. The general spectral evolution is also presented. Velocities measured from Fe II are similar for SLSNe and SNe Ibc, suggesting that diffusion time differences are dominated by mass or opacity. Flat velocity evolution in most SLSNe suggests a dense shell of ejecta. If opacities in SLSNe are similar to other SNe Ibc, the average ejected mass is higher by a factor 2-3. Assuming $\kappa=0.1\,$cm$^2\,$g$^{-1}$, we estimate a mean (median) SLSN ejecta mass of 10$\,$M$_\odot$ (6$\,$M$_\odot$), with a range of 3-30$\,$M$_\odot$. Doubling the assumed opacity brings the masses closer to normal SNe Ibc, but with a high-mass tail. The most probable mechanism for generating SLSNe seems to be the core-collapse of a very massive hydrogen-poor star, forming a millisecond magnetar.