• This Workshop brought top experts, researchers, postdocs, and students from high-energy heavy ion interactions, lattice QCD and hadronic physics communities together. YSTAR2016 discussed the impact of "missing" hyperon resonances on QCD thermodynamics, on freeze-out in heavy ion collisions, on the evolution of early universe, and on the spectroscopy of strange particles. Recent studies that compared lattice QCD predictions of thermodynamic properties of quark-gluon plasma at freeze-out with calculations based on statistical hadron resonance gas models as well as experimentally measured ratios between yields of different hadron species in heavy ion collisions provide indirect evidence for the presence of "missing" resonances in all of these contexts. The aim of the YSTAR2016 Workshop was to sharpen these comparisons and advance our understanding of the formation of strange hadrons from quarks and gluons microseconds after the Big Bang and in todays experiments at LHC and RHIC as well as at future facilities like FAIR, J-PARC and KL at JLab. It was concluded that the new initiative to create a secondary beam of neutral kaons at JLab will make a bridge between the hardron spectroscopy, heavy-ion experiments and lattice QCD studies addressing some major issues related to thermodynamics of the early universe and cosmology in general.
  • The Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study is aimed at assessing the physics potential and the technical feasibility of a new collider with centre-of-mass energies, in the hadron-hadron collision mode, seven times larger than the nominal LHC energies. Operating such machine with heavy ions is an option that is being considered in the accelerator design studies. It would provide, for example, Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 39 and 63 TeV, respectively, per nucleon-nucleon collision, with integrated luminosities above 30 nb^-1 per month for Pb-Pb. This is a report by the working group on heavy-ion physics of the FCC Study. First ideas on the physics opportunities with heavy ions at the FCC are presented, covering the physics of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, of gluon saturation, of photon-induced collisions, as well as connections with other fields of high-energy physics.
  • We determine the equation of state of QCD at finite chemical potential, to order $(\mu_B/T)^6$, for a system of 2+1 quark flavors. The simulations are performed at the physical mass for the light and strange quarks on several lattice spacings; the results are continuum extrapolated using lattices of up to $N_t=16$ temporal resolution. The QCD pressure and interaction measure are calculated along the isentropic trajectories in the $(T,~\mu_B)$ plane corresponding to the RHIC Beam Energy Scan collision energies. Their behavior is determined through analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potentials of the baryonic density. We also determine the Taylor expansion coefficients around $\mu_B=0$ from the simulations at imaginary chemical potentials. Strangeness neutrality and charge conservation are imposed, to match the experimental conditions.
  • We calculate the QCD cross-over temperature, the equation of state and fluctuations of conserved charges at finite density by analytical continuation from imaginary to real chemical potentials. Our calculations are based on new continuum extrapolated lattice simulations using the 4stout staggered actions with a lattice resolution up to $N_t=16$. The simulation parameters are tuned such that the strangeness neutrality is maintained, as it is in heavy ion collisions.
  • We present the crossover line between the quark gluon plasma and the hadron gas phases for small real chemical potentials. First we determine the effect of imaginary values of the chemical potential on the transition temperature using lattice QCD simulations. Then we use various formulas to perform an analytic continuation to real values of the baryo-chemical potential. Our data set maintains strangeness neutrality to match the conditions of heavy ion physics. The systematic errors are under control up to $\mu_B\approx 300$ MeV. For the curvature of the transition line we find that there is an approximate agreement between values from three different observables: the chiral susceptibility, chiral condensate and strange quark susceptibility. The continuum extrapolation is based on $N_t=$ 10, 12 and 16 lattices. By combining the analysis for these three observables we find, for the curvature, the value $\kappa = 0.0149 \pm 0.0021$.
  • Axions are one of the most attractive dark matter candidates. The evolution of their number density in the early universe can be determined by calculating the topological susceptibility $\chi(T)$ of QCD as a function of the temperature. Lattice QCD provides an ab initio technique to carry out such a calculation. A full result needs two ingredients: physical quark masses and a controlled continuum extrapolation from non-vanishing to zero lattice spacings. We determine $\chi(T)$ in the quenched framework (infinitely large quark masses) and extrapolate its values to the continuum limit. The results are compared with the prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation (DIGA). A nice agreement is found for the temperature dependence, whereas the overall normalization of the DIGA result still differs from the non-perturbative continuum extrapolated lattice results by a factor of order ten. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the prediction of the amount of axion dark matter.
  • We calculate second- and fourth-order cumulants of conserved charges in a temperature range stretching from the QCD transition region towards the realm of (resummed) perturbation theory. We perform lattice simulations with staggered quarks; the continuum extrapolation is based on $N_t=10\dots24$ in the crossover-region and $N_t=8\dots16$ at higher temperatures. We find that the Hadron Resonance Gas model predictions describe the lattice data rather well in the confined phase. At high temperatures (above $\sim$250 MeV) we find agreement with the three-loop Hard Thermal Loop results.
  • Recent results for moments of multiplicity distributions of net-protons and net-electric charge from the STAR collaboration are compared to lattice QCD results for higher order fluctuations of baryon number and electric charge by the Wuppertal-Budapest collaboration, with the purpose of extracting the freeze-out temperature and chemical potential. All lattice simulations are performed for a system of 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, at the physical mass for light and strange quarks; all results are continuum extrapolated. We show that it is possible to extract an upper value for the freeze-out temperature, as well as precise baryo-chemical potential values corresponding to the four highest collision energies of the experimental beam energy scan. Consistency between the freeze-out parameters obtained from baryon number and electric charge fluctuations is found. The freeze-out chemical potentials are now in agreement with the statistical hadronization model.
  • We present continuum extrapolated lattice results for the higher order fluctuations of conserved charges in high temperature Quantum Chromodynamics. Through the matching of the grand canonical ensemble on the lattice to the net charge and net baryon distribution realized in heavy ion experiments the temperature and the chemical potential may be estimated at the time of chemical freeze-out
  • We present our results for ratios of higher order fluctuations of electric charge as functions of the temperature. These results are obtained in a system of 2+1 quark flavors at physical quark masses and continuum extrapolated. We compare them to preliminary data on higher order moments of the net electric charge distribution from the STAR collaboration. This allows us to determine the freeze-out temperature and chemical potential from first principles. We also show continuum-extrapolated results for ratios of higher order fluctuations of baryon number. These will allow to test the consistency of the approach, by comparing them to the corresponding experimental data (once they become available) and thus extracting the freeze-out parameters in an independent way.
  • Scale setting is of central importance in lattice QCD. It is required to predict dimensional quantities in physical units. Moreover, it determines the relative lattice spacings of computations performed at different values of the bare coupling, and this is needed for extrapolating results into the continuum. Thus, we calculate a new quantity, $w_0$, for setting the scale in lattice QCD, which is based on the Wilson flow like the scale $t_0$ (M. Luscher, JHEP 1008 (2010) 071). It is cheap and straightforward to implement and compute. In particular, it does not involve the delicate fitting of correlation functions at asymptotic times. It typically can be determined on the few per-mil level. We compute its continuum extrapolated value in 2+1-flavor QCD for physical and non-physical pion and kaon masses, to allow for mass-independent scale setting even away from the physical mass point. We demonstrate its robustness by computing it with two very different actions (one of them with staggered, the other with Wilson fermions) and by showing that the results agree for physical quark masses in the continuum limit.
  • QCD thermodynamics is considered using Wilson fermions in the fixed scale approach. The temperature dependence of the renormalized chiral condensate, quark number susceptibility and Polyakov loop is measured at four lattice spacings allowing for a controlled continuum limit. The light quark masses are fixed to heavier than physical values in this first study. Finite volume effects are ensured to be negligible by using approriately large box sizes. The final continuum results are compared with staggered fermion simulations performed in the fixed N_t approach. The same continuum renormalization conditions are used in both approaches and the final results agree perfectly.
  • We study QCD thermodynamics using two flavors of dynamical overlap fermions with quark masses corresponding to a pion mass of 350 MeV. We determine several observables on N_t=6 and 8 lattices. All our runs are performed with fixed global topology. Our results are compared with staggered ones and a nice agreement is found.
  • We use the Wilson flow to define the gauge anisotropy at a given physical scale. We demonstrate the use of the anisotropic flow by performing the tuning of the bare gauge anisotropy in the tree-level Symanzik action for several lattice spacings and target anisotropies. We use this method to tune the anisotropy parameters in full QCD, where we also exploit the diminishing effect of a well chosen smearing on the renormalization of the fermion anisotropy.
  • Prethermalization of the equation of state and the kinetic temperature to their equilibrium values occurs on time scales dramatically shorter than the thermal equilibration time. This is a crucial ingredient for the understanding of collisions of heavy nuclei or other nonequilibrium phenomena in complex quantum and classical many body systems. We also compare the chemical equilibration time with other characteristic time scales.