• The Lyman alpha (lya) line of Hydrogen is a prominent feature in the spectra of star-forming galaxies, usually redshifted by a few hundreds of km/s compared to the systemic redshift. This large offset hampers follow-up surveys, galaxy pair statistics and correlations with quasar absorption lines when only lya is available. We propose diagnostics that can be used to recover the systemic redshift directly from the properties of the lya line profile. We use spectroscopic observations of Lyman-Alpha Emitters (LAEs) for which a precise measurement of the systemic redshift is available. Our sample contains 13 sources detected between z~3 and z~6 as part of various Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) Guaranteed Time Observations (GTO). We also include a compilation of spectroscopic lya data from the literature spanning a wide redshift range (z~0-8). First, restricting our analysis to double-peaked lya spectra, we find a tight correlation between the velocity offset of the red peak with respect to the systemic redshift, Vpeak, and the separation of the peaks. Secondly, we find a correlation between Vpeak and the full width at half maximum of the lya line. Fitting formulas, to estimate systemic redshifts of galaxies with an accuracy of +-100 km/s when only the lya emission line is available, are given for the two methods.
  • We present a clustering analysis of a sample of 238 Ly{$\alpha$}-emitters at redshift 3<z<6 from the MUSE-Wide survey. This survey mosaics extragalactic legacy fields with 1h MUSE pointings to detect statistically relevant samples of emission line galaxies. We analysed the first year observations from MUSE-Wide making use of the clustering signal in the line-of-sight direction. This method relies on comparing pair-counts at close redshifts for a fixed transverse distance and thus exploits the full potential of the redshift range covered by our sample. A clear clustering signal with a correlation length of r0 = 2.9(+1.0/-1.1) Mpc (comoving) is detected. Whilst this result is based on only about a quarter of the full survey size, it already shows the immense potential of MUSE for efficiently observing and studying the clustering of Ly{$\alpha$}-emitters.
  • We present new MUSE observations of a galaxy group probed by a background quasar. The quasar sightline passes between multiple $z=0.28$ galaxies, whilst showing at the same redshift low ionised metal line species, including Ca II, Mg I, Mg II and Fe II. Based on the galaxy redshifts measured from the MUSE data, we estimate the galaxies to be part of a small galaxy group with a halo mass of $\approx6\times10^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$. We use the MUSE data to reveal the two dimensional dynamical properties of the gas and stars in the group galaxies, and relate these to the absorber kinematics. With these data we consider a number of scenarios for the nature of the gas probed by the sightline absorbers: a co-rotating gas halo associated with a single galaxy within the group; outflowing material from a single group member powered by recent star-formation; and cool dense gas associated with an intra-group medium. We find that the dynamics, galaxy impact parameters, star-formation rates, and the absorber strength suggest the cool gas can not be clearly associated with any single galaxy within the group. Instead we find that the observations are consistent with a superposition of cool gas clouds originating with the observed galaxies as they fall into the group potential, and are now likely in the process of forming the intra-group medium.
  • We use a background quasar to detect the presence of circum-galactic gas around a $z=0.91$ low-mass star forming galaxy. Data from the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT show that the host galaxy has a dust-corrected star-formation rate (SFR) of 4.7$\pm$0.2 Msun/yr, with no companion down to 0.22 Msun/yr (5 $\sigma$) within 240 kpc (30"). Using a high-resolution spectrum (UVES) of the background quasar, which is fortuitously aligned with the galaxy major axis (with an azimuth angle $\alpha$ of only $15^\circ$), we find, in the gas kinematics traced by low-ionization lines, distinct signatures consistent with those expected for a "cold flow disk" extending at least 12 kpc ($3\times R_{1/2}$). We estimate the mass accretion rate $\dot M_{\rm in}$ to be at least two to three times larger than the SFR, using the geometric constraints from the IFU data and the HI column density of $\log N_{\rm HI} \simeq 20.4$ obtained from a {\it HST}/COS NUV spectrum. From a detailed analysis of the low-ionization lines (e.g. ZnII, CrII, TiII, MnII, SiII), the accreting material appears to be enriched to about 0.4 $Z_\odot$ (albeit with large uncertainties: $\log Z/Z_\odot=-0.4~\pm~0.4$), which is comparable to the galaxy metallicity ($12+\log \rm O/H=8.7\pm0.2$), implying a large recycling fraction from past outflows. Blue-shifted MgII and FeII absorptions in the galaxy spectrum from the MUSE data reveal the presence of an outflow. The MgII and FeII doublet ratios indicate emission infilling due to scattering processes, but the MUSE data do not show any signs of fluorescent FeII* emission.
  • We present the results obtained with MUSE on the core of the lensing cluster A1689. Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central region, allowing us to conduct a complete census on both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources, identified based on their spectral features without preselection. We investigate the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them based on photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Among them, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission-lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. 17 sources in total are found at z > 3 based on their Lyman-alpha emission, with Lyman-alpha luminosities ranging between 40.5 < log(Ly{\alpha}) < 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the LF toward the faintest-end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of {\alpha} < -1.5, although this result still needs further investigation. These results illustrate the efficiency of MUSE in the characterization of lensing clusters on one hand, and the study of faint and distant populations of galaxies on the other hand. In particular, our current survey of lensing clusters should provide a unique census of sources responsible for the reionization in a representative volume at z ~ 4-7.
  • We report the detection of extended Ly alpha emission around individual star-forming galaxies at redshifts z = 3-6 in an ultradeep exposure of the Hubble Deep Field South obtained with MUSE on the ESO-VLT. The data reach a limiting surface brightness (1sigma) of ~1 x 10^-19 erg s^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 in azimuthally averaged radial profiles, an order of magnitude improvement over previous narrowband imaging. Our sample consists of 26 spectroscopically confirmed Ly alpha-emitting, but mostly continuum-faint (m_AB >~ 27) galaxies. In most objects the Ly alpha emission is considerably more extended than the UV continuum light. While 5 of the faintest galaxies in the sample show no significantly detected Ly alpha haloes, the derived upper limits suggest that this is just due to insufficient S/N. Ly alpha haloes therefore appear to be (nearly) ubiquitous even for low-mass (~10^8-10^9 M_sun) star-forming galaxies at z>3. We decompose the Ly alpha emission of each object into a compact `continuum-like' and an extended halo component, and infer sizes and luminosities of the haloes. The extended Ly alpha emission approximately follows an exponential surface brightness distribution with a scale length of a few kpc. While these haloes are thus quite modest in terms of their absolute sizes, they are larger by a factor of 5-15 than the corresponding rest-frame UV continuum sources as seen by HST. They are also much more extended, by a factor ~5, than Ly alpha haloes around low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Between ~40% and >90% of the observed Ly alpha flux comes from the extended halo component, with no obvious correlation of this fraction with either the absolute or the relative size of the Ly alpha halo. Our observations provide direct insights into the spatial distribution of at least partly neutral gas residing in the circumgalactic medium of low to intermediate mass galaxies at z > 3.
  • We present a first study of the effect of local photoionising radiation on gas cooling in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy formation. We explore the combined effect of ionising radiation from young and old stellar populations. The method computes the effect of multiple radiative sources using the same tree algorithm used for gravity, so it is computationally efficient and well resolved. The method foregoes calculating absorption and scattering in favour of a constant escape fraction for young stars to keep the calculation efficient enough to simulate the entire evolution of a galaxy in a cosmological context to the present day. This allows us to quantify the effect of the local photoionisation feedback through the whole history of a galaxy`s formation. The simulation of a Milky Way like galaxy using the local photoionisation model forms ~ 40 % less stars than a simulation that only includes a standard uniform background UV field. The local photoionisation model decreases star formation by increasing the cooling time of the gas in the halo and increasing the equilibrium temperature of dense gas in the disc. Coupling the local radiation field to gas cooling from the halo provides a preventive feedback mechanism which keeps the central disc light and produces slowly rising rotation curves without resorting to extreme feedback mechanisms. These preliminary results indicate that the effect of local photoionising sources is significant and should not be ignored in models of galaxy formation.