• This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.
  • We show that lattice regularization of noncommutative field theories can be used to study non-perturbative vacuum phases. Specifically we provide evidence for the existence of a striped phase in two-dimensional noncommutative scalar field theory
  • We describe a Fourier Accelerated Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm suitable for dynamical fermion simulations of non-gauge models. We test the algorithm in supersymmetric quantum mechanics viewed as a one-dimensional Euclidean lattice field theory. We find dramatic reductions in the autocorrelation time of the algorithm in comparison to standard HMC.
  • Starting from a simple discrete model which exhibits a supersymmetric invariance we construct a local, interacting, two-dimensional Euclidean lattice theory which also admits an exact supersymmetry. This model is shown to correspond to the Wess-Zumino model with extended N=2 supersymmetry in the continuum. We have performed dynamical fermion simulations to check the spectrum and supersymmetric Ward identities and find good agreement with theory.
  • We verify that summing 2D DT geometries correctly reproduces the Polyakov action for the conformal mode, including all ghost contributions, at large volumes. The Gaussian action is reproduced even for central charges greater than one lending strong support to the hypothesis that the space of all possible dyamical triangulations approximates well the space of physically distinct metrics independent of the precise nature of the matter coupling.
  • We verify that summing 2D DT geometries correctly reproduces the Polyakov action for the conformal mode, including all ghost contributions, at large volumes. The Gaussian action is reproduced even for c=10, well into the branched polymer phase, which confirms the expectation that the DT measure is indeed correct in this regime as well.
  • We describe the statistical behavior of anisotropic crystalline membranes. In particular we give the phase diagram and critical exponents for phantom membranes and discuss the generalization to self-avoiding membranes.
  • We review the derivation of the Liouville action in 2DQG via the trace anomaly and emphasize how a similar approach can be used to derive an effective action describing the long wavelength dynamics of the conformal factor in 4D. In 2D we describe how to make an explicit connection between dynamical triangulations and this continuum theory, and present results which confirm the equivalance of the two approaches. By reconstructing a lattice conformal mode from DT simulations it should be possible to test this equivalence in 4D also.
  • We show that the phase transition previously observed in dynamical triangulation models of quantum gravity can be understood as being due to the creation of a singular link. The transition between singular and non-singular geometries as the gravitational coupling is varied appears to be first order.
  • We consider two issues in the DT model of quantum gravity. First, it is shown that the triangulation space for D>3 is dominated by triangulations containing a single singular (D-3)-simplex composed of vertices with divergent dual volumes. Second we study the ergodicity of current simulation algorithms. Results from runs conducted close to the phase transition of the four-dimensional theory are shown. We see no strong indications of ergodicity br eaking in the simulation and our data support recent claims that the transition is most probably first order. Furthermore, we show that the critical properties of the system are determined by the dynamics of remnant singular vertices.
  • The statistical mechanics of flexible two-dimensional surfaces (membranes) appears in a wide variety of physical settings. In this talk we discuss the simplest case of fixed-connectivity surfaces. We first review the current theoretical understanding of the remarkable flat phase of such membranes. We then summarize the results of a recent large scale Monte Carlo simulation of the simplest conceivable discrete realization of this system \cite{BCFTA}. We verify the existence of long-range order, determine the associated critical exponents of the flat phase and compare the results to the predictions of various theoretical models.
  • We present the results of a high-statistics Monte Carlo simulation of a phantom crystalline (fixed-connectivity) membrane with free boundary. We verify the existence of a flat phase by examining lattices of size up to $128^2$. The Hamiltonian of the model is the sum of a simple spring pair potential, with no hard-core repulsion, and bending energy. The only free parameter is the the bending rigidity $\kappa$. In-plane elastic constants are not explicitly introduced. We obtain the remarkable result that this simple model dynamically generates the elastic constants required to stabilise the flat phase. We present measurements of the size (Flory) exponent $\nu$ and the roughness exponent $\zeta$. We also determine the critical exponents $\eta$ and $\eta_u$ describing the scale dependence of the bending rigidity ($\kappa(q) \sim q^{-\eta}$) and the induced elastic constants ($\lambda(q) \sim \mu(q) \sim q^{\eta_u}$). At bending rigidity $\kappa = 1.1$, we find $\nu = 0.95(5)$ (Hausdorff dimension $d_H = 2/\nu = 2.1(1)$), $\zeta = 0.64(2)$ and $\eta_u = 0.50(1)$. These results are consistent with the scaling relation $\zeta = (2+\eta_u)/4$. The additional scaling relation $\eta = 2(1-\zeta)$ implies $\eta = 0.72(4)$. A direct measurement of $\eta$ from the power-law decay of the normal-normal correlation function yields $\eta \approx 0.6$ on the $128^2$ lattice.
  • By a sequence of numerical experiments we demonstrate that generic triangulations of the $D-$sphere for $D>3$ contain one {\it singular} $(D-3)-$simplex. The mean number of elementary $D-$simplices sharing this simplex increases with the volume of the triangulation according to a simple power law. The lower dimension subsimplices associated with this $(D-3)-$simplex also show a singular behaviour. Possible consequences for the DT model of four-dimensional quantum gravity are discussed.
  • We review the status of different approaches to lattice quantum gravity indicating the successes and problems of each. Recent developments within the dynamical triangulation formulation are then described. Plenary talk at LATTICE 95 July 11-15, Melbourne, Australia.
  • We propose a new real-space renormalization group transformation for dynamical triangulations. It is shown to preserve geometrical exponents such as the string susceptibility and Hausdorff dimension. We furthermore show evidence for a fixed point structure both in pure gravity and gravity coupled to a critical Ising system. In the latter case we are able to extract estimates for the gravitationally dressed exponents which agree to within 2-3% of the KPZ formula.
  • We examine the scaling of geodesic correlation functions in two-dimensional gravity and in spin systems coupled to gravity. The numerical data support the scaling hypothesis and indicate that the quantum geometry develops a non-perturbative length scale. The existence of this length scale allows us to extract a Hausdorff dimension. In the case of pure gravity we find d_H approx. 3.8, in support of recent theoretical calculations that d_H = 4. We also discuss the back-reaction of matter on the geometry.
  • We present numerical results supporting the existence of an exponential bound in the dynamical triangulation model of three-dimensional quantum gravity.Both the critical coupling and various other quantities show a slow power law approach to the infinite volume limit.
  • Recent models for discrete euclidean quantum gravity incorporate a sum over simplicial triangulations. We describe an algorithm for simulating such models in general dimensions. As illustration we show results from simulations in four dimensions
  • We have studied a model which has been proposed as a regularisation for four dimensional quantum gravity. The partition function is constructed by performing a weighted sum over all triangulations of the four sphere. Using numerical simulation we find that the number of such triangulations containing $V$ simplices grows faster than exponentially with $V$. This property ensures that the model has no thermodynamic limit.
  • We present the results of a high statistics Monte Carlo study of a model for four dimensional euclidean quantum gravity based on summing over triangulations. We show evidence for two phases; in one there is a logarithmic scaling on the mean linear extent with volume, whilst the other exhibits power law behaviour with exponent 1/2. We are able to extract a finite size scaling exponent governing the growth of the susceptibility peak
  • We study the XY model on a lattice with fluctuating connectivity. The expectation is that at an appropriate critical point such a system corresponds to a compactified boson coupled to 2d quantum gravity. Our simulations focus, in particular, on the important topological features of the system. The results lend strong support to the two phase structure predicted on the basis of analytical calculations. A careful finite size scaling analysis yields estimates for the critical exponents in the low temperature phase.