• Precision pulsar timing requires optimization against measurement errors and astrophysical variance from the neutron stars themselves and the interstellar medium. We investigate optimization of arrival time precision as a function of radio frequency and bandwidth. We find that increases in bandwidth that reduce the contribution from receiver noise are countered by the strong chromatic dependence of interstellar effects and intrinsic pulse-profile evolution. The resulting optimal frequency range is therefore telescope and pulsar dependent. We demonstrate the results for five pulsars included in current pulsar timing arrays and determine that they are not optimally observed at current center frequencies. For those objects, we find that better choices of total bandwidth as well as center frequency can improve the arrival-time precision. Wideband receivers centered at somewhat higher frequencies with respect to the currently adopted receivers can reduce required overall integration times and provide significant improvements in arrival time uncertainty by a factor of ~sqrt(2) in most cases, assuming a fixed integration time. We also discuss how timing programs can be extended to pulsars with larger dispersion measures through the use of higher-frequency observations.
  • We report the first detections of the repeating fast radio burst source FRB 121102 above 5.2 GHz. Observations were performed using the 4$-$8 GHz receiver of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the Breakthrough Listen digital backend. We present the spectral, temporal and polarization properties of 21 bursts detected within the first 60 minutes of a total 6-hour observations. These observations comprise the highest burst density yet reported in the literature, with 18 bursts being detected in the first 30 minutes. A few bursts clearly show temporal sub-structures with distinct spectral properties. These sub-structures superimpose to provide enhanced peak signal-to-noise ratio at higher trial dispersion measures. Broad features occur in $\sim 1$ GHz wide subbands that typically differ in peak frequency between bursts within the band. Finer-scale structures ($\sim 10-50$ MHz) within these bursts are consistent with that expected from Galactic diffractive interstellar scintillation. The bursts exhibit nearly 100% linear polarization, and a large average rotation measure of 9.359$\pm$0.012 $\times$ 10$^{\rm 4}$ rad m$^{\rm -2}$ (in the observer's frame). No circular polarization was found for any burst. We measure an approximately constant polarization position angle in the 13 brightest bursts. The peak flux densities of the reported bursts have average values (0.2$\pm$0.1 Jy), similar to those seen at lower frequencies ($<3$ GHz), while the average burst widths (0.64$\pm$0.46 ms) are relatively narrower.
  • This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2017 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) theoretical uncertainties and dataset dependence of parton distribution functions, (III) new developments in jet substructure techniques, (IV) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (V) phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run II with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements, and (VI) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators.
  • We report the discovery and initial follow-up of a double neutron star (DNS) system, PSR J1946$+$2052, with the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array pulsar (PALFA) survey. PSR J1946$+$2052 is a 17-ms pulsar in a 1.88-hour, eccentric ($e \, =\, 0.06$) orbit with a $\gtrsim 1.2 \, M_\odot$ companion. We have used the Jansky Very Large Array to localize PSR J1946$+$2052 to a precision of 0.09 arcseconds using a new phase binning mode. We have searched multiwavelength catalogs for coincident sources but did not find any counterparts. The improved position enabled a measurement of the spin period derivative of the pulsar ($\dot{P} \, = \, 9\,\pm \, 2 \,\times 10^{-19}$); the small inferred magnetic field strength at the surface ($B_S \, = \, 4 \, \times \, 10^9 \, \rm G$) indicates that this pulsar has been recycled. This and the orbital eccentricity lead to the conclusion that PSR J1946$+$2052 is in a DNS system. Among all known radio pulsars in DNS systems, PSR J1946$+$2052 has the shortest orbital period and the shortest estimated merger timescale, 46 Myr; at that time it will display the largest spin effects on gravitational wave waveforms of any such system discovered to date. We have measured the advance of periastron passage for this system, $\dot{\omega} \, = \, 25.6 \, \pm \, 0.3\, \deg \rm yr^{-1}$, implying a total system mass of only 2.50 $\pm$ 0.04 $M_\odot$, so it is among the lowest mass DNS systems. This total mass measurement combined with the minimum companion mass constrains the pulsar mass to $\lesssim 1.3 \, M_\odot$.
  • Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration, extragalactic radio flashes of unknown physical origin. FRB 121102, the only known repeating FRB source, has been localized to a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z = 0.193, and is spatially coincident with a compact, persistent radio source. The origin of the bursts, the nature of the persistent source, and the properties of the local environment are still debated. Here we present bursts that show ~100% linearly polarized emission at a very high and variable Faraday rotation measure in the source frame: RM_src = +1.46 x 10^5 rad m^-2 and +1.33 x 10^5 rad m^-2 at epochs separated by 7 months, in addition to narrow (< 30 mus) temporal structure. The large and variable rotation measure demonstrates that FRB 121102 is in an extreme and dynamic magneto-ionic environment, while the short burst durations argue for a neutron star origin. Such large rotation measures have, until now, only been observed in the vicinities of massive black holes (M_BH > 10^4 MSun). Indeed, the properties of the persistent radio source are compatible with those of a low-luminosity, accreting massive black hole. The bursts may thus come from a neutron star in such an environment. However, the observed properties may also be explainable in other models, such as a highly magnetized wind nebula or supernova remnant surrounding a young neutron star.
  • We search for an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) in the newly released $11$-year dataset from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). While we find no significant evidence for a GWB, we place constraints on a GWB from a population of supermassive black-hole binaries, from cosmic strings, and from a primordial GWB. For the first time, we find that the GWB upper limits and detection statistics are sensitive to the Solar System ephemeris (SSE) model used, and that SSE errors can mimic a GWB signal. To mitigate this effect, we developed and implemented a novel approach that bridges systematic SSE differences, producing the first PTA constraints that are robust against SSE uncertainties. We place a $95\%$ upper limit on the GW strain amplitude of $A_\mathrm{GWB}<1.45\times 10^{-15}$ at a frequency of $f=1$ yr$^{-1}$ for a fiducial $f^{-2/3}$ power-law spectrum, and with inter-pulsar correlations modeled. This is a factor of $\sim 2$ improvement over the NANOGrav $9$-year limit, calculated using the same procedure. Previous PTA upper limits on the GWB will need revision in light of SSE systematic uncertainties. We also characterize the combined influence of the mass-density of stars in galactic cores, the eccentricity of binaries at formation, and the relation between the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the galactic bulge (the $M_\mathrm{BH}-M_\mathrm{bulge}$ relation). We constrain cosmic-string tension on the basis of recent simulations, yielding an SSE-marginalized 95\% upper limit on the cosmic string tension of $G\mu < 5.3\times 10^{-11}$---a factor of $\sim 2$ better than the NANOGrav $9$-year constraints. We then use our new Bayesian SSE model to limit the energy density of primordial GWBs, corresponding to $\Omega_\mathrm{GWB}(f)h^2<3.4 \times 10^{-10}$ for a radiation-dominated inflationary era. [ABRIDGED]
  • Gravitational wave (GW) detection with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) requires accurate noise characterization. The noise of our Galactic-scale GW detector has been systematically evaluated by the Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation working groups within the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. Intrinsically, individual radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) used by NANOGrav can have some degree of achromatic red spin noise, as well as white noise due to pulse phase jitter. Along any given line-of-sight, the ionized interstellar medium contributes chromatic noise through dispersion measure (DM) variations, interstellar scintillation, and scattering. These effects contain both red and white components. In the future, with wideband receivers, the effects of frequency-dependent DM will become important. Having anticipated and measured these diverse sources of detector noise, the NANOGrav PTA remains well-poised to detect low-frequency GWs.
  • The Tolman-Bondi-Lema\^itre type of inhomogeneous spacetime with generalised Chaplygin gas equation of state given by $p = -\frac{A}{\rho^{\alpha}}$ is investigated where $ \alpha$ is a constant. We get an inhomogeneous spacetime at early stage but at the late stage of universe the inhomogeneity disappear with suitable radial co-ordinate transformation. For the large scale factor our model behaves like $\Lambda$CDM type which is in accord with the recent WMAP studies. We have calculated $\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial r}$ and it is found to be negative for $\alpha > 0$ which is in agreement with the observational analysis. A striking difference with Chaplygin gas ($ \alpha = 1$) lies in the fact that with any suitable co-ordinate transformation our metric cannot be reduced to the Einstein-de Sitter type of homogeneous spacetime as is possible for the Chaplygin gas. We have also studied the effective deceleration parameter and find that the desired feature of \emph{flip} occurs at the late universe. It is seen that the flip time depends explicitly on $\alpha$. We also find that flip is not synchronous occurring earlier at the outer shells, thus offering a natural path against occurrence of wellknown shell crossing singularity. This is unlike the Tolman-Bondi case with perfect gas where one has to impose stringent external conditions to avoid this type of singularity. We further observe that if we adopt separation of variables method to solve the field equations the inhomogeneity in matter distribution disappears. The whole situation is later discussed with the help of Raychaudhury equation and the results compared with previous cases. This work is the generalisation of our previous article where we have taken $\alpha =1$.
  • We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit of $3\times10^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ on the 0.5--10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations $<700$ ms, which corresponds to a burst energy of $4\times10^{45}$ erg at the measured distance of FRB 121102. We also place limits on the 0.5--10 keV fluence of $5\times10^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ and $1\times10^{-9}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ for bursts emitted at any time during the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, respectively, assuming a typical X-ray burst duration of 5 ms. We analyze data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the 10--100 keV fluence of $4\times10^{-9}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ ($5\times10^{47}$ erg at the distance of FRB 121102) for gamma-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts. We also present a deep search for a persistent X-ray source using all of the X-ray observations taken to date and place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the 0.5--10 keV flux of $4\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ ($3\times10^{41}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ at the distance of FRB 121102). We discuss these non-detections in the context of the host environment of FRB 121102 and of possible sources of fast radio bursts in general.
  • The volume of data that will be produced by new-generation surveys requires automatic classification methods to select and analyze sources. Indeed, this is the case for the search for strong gravitational lenses, where the population of the detectable lensed sources is only a very small fraction of the full source population. We apply for the first time a morphological classification method based on a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for recognizing strong gravitational lenses in $255$ square degrees of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), one of the current-generation optical wide surveys. The CNN is currently optimized to recognize lenses with Einstein radii $\gtrsim 1.4$ arcsec, about twice the $r$-band seeing in KiDS. In a sample of $21789$ colour-magnitude selected Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG), of which three are known lenses, the CNN retrieves 761 strong-lens candidates and correctly classifies two out of three of the known lenses. The misclassified lens has an Einstein radius below the range on which the algorithm is trained. We down-select the most reliable 56 candidates by a joint visual inspection. This final sample is presented and discussed. A conservative estimate based on our results shows that with our proposed method it should be possible to find $\sim100$ massive LRG-galaxy lenses at $z\lsim 0.4$ in KiDS when completed. In the most optimistic scenario this number can grow considerably (to maximally $\sim$2400 lenses), when widening the colour-magnitude selection and training the CNN to recognize smaller image-separation lens systems.
  • We present results of the coordinated observing campaign that made the first subarcsecond localization of a Fast Radio Burst, FRB 121102. During this campaign, we made the first simultaneous detection of an FRB burst by multiple telescopes: the VLA at 3 GHz and the Arecibo Observatory at 1.4 GHz. Of the nine bursts detected by the Very Large Array at 3 GHz, four had simultaneous observing coverage at other observatories. We use multi-observatory constraints and modeling of bursts seen only at 3 GHz to confirm earlier results showing that burst spectra are not well modeled by a power law. We find that burst spectra are characterized by a ~500 MHz envelope and apparent radio energy as high as $10^{40}$ erg. We measure significant changes in the apparent dispersion between bursts that can be attributed to frequency-dependent profiles or some other intrinsic burst structure that adds a systematic error to the estimate of DM by up to 1%. We use FRB 121102 as a prototype of the FRB class to estimate a volumetric birth rate of FRB sources $R_{FRB} \approx 5x10^{-5}/N_r$ Mpc$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$, where $N_r$ is the number of bursts per source over its lifetime. This rate is broadly consistent with models of FRBs from young pulsars or magnetars born in superluminous supernovae or long gamma-ray bursts, if the typical FRB repeats on the order of thousands of times during its lifetime.
  • Plasma lenses in the host galaxies of fast radio bursts (FRBs) can strongly modulate FRB amplitudes for a wide range of distances, including the $\sim $ Gpc distance of the repeater FRB121102. To produce caustics, the lens' dispersion-measure depth (${\rm DM}_{\ell}$), scale size ($a$), and distance from the source ($d_{\rm sl}$) must satisfy ${\rm DM}_{\ell} d_{\rm sl} / a^2 \gtrsim 0.65~ {\rm pc^2 \ AU^{-2} \ cm^{-3}}$. Caustics produce strong magnifications ($\lesssim 10^2$) on short time scales ($\sim$ hours to days and perhaps shorter) along with narrow, epoch dependent spectral peaks (0.1 to 1~GHz). However, strong suppression also occurs in long-duration ($\sim$ months) troughs. For geometries that produce multiple images, the resulting burst components will arrive differentially by $< 1~\mu$s to tens of ms and they will show different apparent dispersion measures, $\delta{\rm DM}_{\rm apparent} \sim 1$ pc cm$^{-3}$. Arrival time perturbations may mask any underlying periodicity with period $\lesssim 1$ s. When arrival times differ by less than the burst width, interference effects in dynamic spectra are expected. Strong lensing requires source sizes smaller than $({\rm Fresnel~scale)^2} / a$, which can be satisfied by compact objects such as neutron star magnetospheres but not by AGNs. Much of the phenomenology of the repeating fast radio burst source FRB121102 is similar to lensing effects. The overall picture can be tested by obtaining wideband spectra of bursts (from $<1$ to 10 GHz and possibly higher), which can also be used to characterize the plasma environment near FRB sources. A rich variety of phenomena is expected from an ensemble of lenses near the FRB source. We discuss constraints on densities, magnetic fields, and locations of plasma lenses related to requirements for lensing to occur.
  • Fast radio bursts are astronomical radio flashes of unknown physical nature with durations of milliseconds. Their dispersive arrival times suggest an extragalactic origin and imply radio luminosities orders of magnitude larger than any other kind of known short-duration radio transient. Thus far, all FRBs have been detected with large single-dish telescopes with arcminute localizations, and attempts to identify their counterparts (source or host galaxy) have relied on contemporaneous variability of field sources or the presence of peculiar field stars or galaxies. These attempts have not resulted in an unambiguous association with a host or multi-wavelength counterpart. Here we report the sub-arcsecond localization of FRB 121102, the only known repeating burst source, using high-time-resolution radio interferometric observations that directly image the bursts themselves. Our precise localization reveals that FRB 121102 originates within 100 mas of a faint 180 uJy persistent radio source with a continuum spectrum that is consistent with non-thermal emission, and a faint (25th magnitude) optical counterpart. The flux density of the persistent radio source varies by tens of percent on day timescales, and very long baseline radio interferometry yields an angular size less than 1.7 mas. Our observations are inconsistent with the fast radio burst having a Galactic origin or its source being located within a prominent star-forming galaxy. Instead, the source appears to be co-located with a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus or a previously unknown type of extragalactic source. [Truncated] If other fast radio bursts have similarly faint radio and optical counterparts, our findings imply that direct sub-arcsecond localizations of FRBs may be the only way to provide reliable associations.
  • Carrier multiplication by singlet exciton fission enhances photovoltaic conversion efficiencies in organic solids. This decay of one singlet exciton into two triplet states promises to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit as up to two electrons may be harvested per absorbed photon. Intermolecular coupling is deemed mandatory for both, singlet exciton fission and a band-like transport. Such a coupling is manifested, $e.g.$, by the Davydov-splitting of the lowest-energy exciton transition in crystalline organic solids. For the model system perfluoropentacene, the corresponding transitions in the experimental, polarisation-resolved absorption spectra are identified by theoretical calculations based on the concept of H- and J- aggregation. Optical injection into the first vibronic progression of the fundamental exciton transitions significantly perturbs the higher-energy transitions that are associated to H-type aggregates of the $S_0 \rightarrow S_3$ transition during and following efficient singlet exciton fission. These findings underline the necessity for efficient carrier extraction as triplet accumulation may be detrimental to both, singlet exciton fission and any potentially band like transport. More generally, our observations indicate that electronic excitations can perturb the electronic band structure in organic crystals and highlight their correlated nature by potentially distorting the lattice.
  • We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5-0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi gamma-ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199-day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 solar masses. Several of the sources exhibit timing noise, and two, PSRs J0611+1436 and J1907+0631, have both suffered large glitches, but with very different post-glitch rotation properties. In particular, the rotational period of PSR J0611+1436 will not recover to its pre-glitch value for about 12 years, a far greater recovery timescale than seen following any other large glitches.
  • We analyze dispersion measure (DM) variations of 37 millisecond pulsars in the 9-year NANOGrav data release and constrain the sources of these variations. Variations are significant for nearly all pulsars, with characteristic timescales comparable to or even shorter than the average spacing between observations. Five pulsars have periodic annual variations, 14 pulsars have monotonically increasing or decreasing trends, and 13 pulsars show both effects. Several pulsars show correlations between DM excesses and lines of sight that pass close to the Sun. Mapping of the DM variations as a function of the pulsar trajectory can identify localized ISM features and, in one case, an upper limit to the size of the dispersing region of 13.2 AU. Finally, five pulsars show very nearly quadratic structure functions, which could be indicative of an underlying Kolmogorov medium. Four pulsars show roughly Kolmogorov structure functions and another four show structure functions less steep than Kolmogorov. One pulsar has too large an uncertainty to allow comparisons. We discuss explanations for apparent departures from a Kolmogorov-like spectrum, and show that the presence of other trends in the data is the most likely cause.
  • We report the discovery of two long-term intermittent radio pulsars in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, extended observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have revealed the details of their rotation and radiation properties. PSRs J1910+0517 and J1929+1357 show long-term extreme bi-modal intermittency, switching between active (ON) and inactive (OFF) emission states and indicating the presence of a large, hitherto unrecognised, underlying population of such objects. For PSR J1929+1357, the initial duty cycle was fON=0.008, but two years later this changed, quite abruptly, to fON=0.16. This is the first time that a significant evolution in the activity of an intermittent pulsar has been seen and we show that the spin-down rate of the pulsar is proportional to the activity. The spin-down rate of PSR J1929+1357 is increased by a factor of 1.8 when it is in active mode, similar to the increase seen in the other three known long-term intermittent pulsars.
  • Gravitational wave astronomy using a pulsar timing array requires high-quality millisecond pulsars, correctable interstellar propagation delays, and high-precision measurements of pulse times of arrival. Here we identify noise in timing residuals that exceeds that predicted for arrival time estimation for millisecond pulsars observed by the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We characterize the excess noise using variance and structure function analyses. We find that 26 out of 37 pulsars show inconsistencies with a white-noise-only model based on the short timescale analysis of each pulsar and we demonstrate that the excess noise has a red power spectrum for 15 pulsars. We also decompose the excess noise into chromatic (radio-frequency-dependent) and achromatic components. Associating the achromatic red-noise component with spin noise and including additional power-spectrum-based estimates from the literature, we estimate a scaling law in terms of spin parameters (frequency and frequency derivative) and data-span length and compare it to the scaling law of Shannon \& Cordes (2010). We briefly discuss our results in terms of detection of gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies.
  • In pulsar timing, timing residuals are the differences between the observed times of arrival and the predictions from the timing model. A comprehensive timing model will produce featureless residuals, which are presumably composed of dominating noise and weak physical effects excluded from the timing model (e.g. gravitational waves). In order to apply the optimal statistical methods for detecting the weak gravitational wave signals, we need to know the statistical properties of the noise components in the residuals. In this paper we utilize a variety of non-parametric statistical tests to analyze the whiteness and Gaussianity of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) 5-year timing data which are obtained from the Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope from 2005 to 2010 (Demorest et al. 2013). We find that most of the data are consistent with white noise; Many data deviate from Gaussianity at different levels, nevertheless, removing outliers in some pulsars will mitigate the deviations.
  • We report here the magneto-transport properties of the newly synthesized Heusler compound Cr2NiGa which crystallizes in a disordered cubic B2 structure belonging to Pm-3m space group. The sample is found to be paramagnetic down to 2 K with metallic character. On application of magnetic field, a significantly large increase in resistivity is observed which corresponds to magnetoresistance as high as 112% at 150 kOe of field at the lowest temperature. Most remarkably, the sample shows negative temperature coefficient of resistivity below about 50 K under the application of field gretare than or equal to 80 kOe, signifying a field-induced metal to `insulating' transition. The observed magnetoresistance follows Kohler's rule below 20 K indicating the validity of the semiclassical model of electronic transport in metal with a single relaxation time. A multi-band model for electronic transport, originally proposed for semimetals, is found to be appropriate to describe the magneto-transport behavior of the sample.
  • We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz at the Arecibo Observatory for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value ($\sim559$ pc cm$^{-3}$) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic value. The 2-GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2-GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5$\sigma$ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined with archival WISE 22-$\mu$m and IPHAS H$\alpha$ surveys, rules out the presence of an intervening Galactic HII region. We update our estimate of the FRB detection rate in the PALFA survey to be 1.1$^{+3.7}_{-1.0} \times 10^4$ FRBs sky$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$ (95% confidence) for peak flux density at 1.4 GHz above 300 mJy. We find that the intrinsic widths of the 12 FRB 121102 bursts from Arecibo are, on average, significantly longer than the intrinsic widths of the 13 single-component FRBs detected with the Parkes telescope.
  • The use of pulsars as astrophysical clocks for gravitational wave experiments demands the highest possible timing precision. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs) are limited by stochastic processes that occur in the pulsar itself, along the line of sight through the interstellar medium, and in the measurement process. On timescales of seconds to hours, the TOA variance exceeds that from template-fitting errors due to additive noise. We assess contributions to the total variance from two additional effects: amplitude and phase jitter intrinsic to single pulses and changes in the interstellar impulse response from scattering. The three effects have different dependencies on time, frequency, and pulse signal-to-noise ratio. We use data on 37 pulsars from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves to assess the individual contributions to the overall intraday noise budget for each pulsar. We detect jitter in 22 pulsars and estimate the average value of RMS jitter in our pulsars to be $\sim 1\%$ of pulse phase. We examine how jitter evolves as a function of frequency and find evidence for evolution. Finally, we compare our measurements with previous noise parameter estimates and discuss methods to improve gravitational wave detection pipelines.
  • While most studies emphasize on certain aspects of Pathogen-Host Interactions (PHI), such as the preferential attachment of bacteria or virus to its human receptor homolog, studies have attempted to methodically classify interactions among pathogenic proteins and their host proteins. Here we have analyzed 182 pathogens from The Pathogen-Host Interaction Search Tool (PHISTO) and could identify the proteins/protein coding genes that act on both virus and bacteria. Importantly there were few proteins viz. P53 (Tumor protein p53), NFKB1 (Nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1), GBLP (Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like-1), TOX4 (TOX high mobility group box family member 4), PDIA1 (Protein disulfide-isomerase precursor), MHY9 (Myosin 9), RAC1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1), CCAR2 (Cell cycle and apoptosis regulator protein 2) and ILF3 (Interleukin enhancer binding factor 3) that were more susceptible to both bacterial and viral pathogens. Identification of such important interacting proteins (IIPs) can elicit significant insights for better understanding the molecular mechanisms of such pathogens that interact with the human host.
  • We report the discovery and timing results for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA survey: PSRs J1906+0055, J1914+0659, J1933+1726, J1938+2516, and J1957+2516. Timing observations of the 5 pulsars were conducted with the Arecibo and Lovell telescopes for time spans ranging from 1.5 to 3.3 yr. All of the MSPs except one (PSR J1914+0659) are in binary systems with low eccentricities. PSR J1957+2516 is likely a redback pulsar, with a ~0.1 $M_\odot$ companion and possible eclipses that last ~10% of the orbit. The position of PSR J1957+2516 is also coincident with a NIR source. All 5 MSPs are distant (>3.1 kpc) as determined from their dispersion measures, and none of them show evidence of $\gamma$-ray pulsations in a search of Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data. These 5 MSPs bring the total number of MSPs discovered by the PALFA survey to 26 and further demonstrate the power of this survey in finding distant, highly dispersed MSPs deep in the Galactic plane.
  • We report here the Einstein@Home discovery of PSR J1913+1102, a 27.3-ms pulsar found in data from the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. The pulsar is in a 4.95-hr double neutron star (DNS) system with an eccentricity of 0.089. From radio timing with the Arecibo 305-m telescope, we measure the rate of advance of periastron to be 5.632(18) deg/yr. Assuming general relativity accurately models the orbital motion, this corresponds to a total system mass of 2.875(14) solar masses, similar to the mass of the most massive DNS known to date, B1913+16, but with a much smaller eccentricity. The small eccentricity indicates that the second-formed neutron star (the companion of PSR J1913+1102) was born in a supernova with a very small associated kick and mass loss. In that case this companion is likely, by analogy with other systems, to be a light (1.2 solar mass) neutron star; the system would then be highly asymmetric. A search for radio pulsations from the companion yielded no plausible detections, so we can't yet confirm this mass asymmetry. By the end of 2016, timing observations should permit the detection of two additional post-Keplerian parameters: the Einstein delay, which will enable precise mass measurements and a verification of the possible mass asymmetry of the system, and the orbital decay due to the emission of gravitational waves, which will allow another test of the radiative properties of gravity. The latter effect will cause the system to coalesce in ~0.5 Gyr.