• During pilot observations of the Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Galaxy Evolution (VESTIGE), a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey of the Virgo cluster carried out with MegaCam at the CFHT, we have observed the spiral galaxy NGC 4254 (M99). Deep Halpha+[NII] narrow-band and GALEX UV images revealed the presence of 60 compact (70-500 pc radius) star forming regions up to ~ 20 kpc outside the optical disc of the galaxy. These regions are located along a tail of HI gas stripped from the disc of the galaxy after a rapid gravitational encounter with another Virgo cluster member that simulations indicate occurred 280-750 Myr ago. We have combined the VESTIGE data with multifrequency data from the UV to the far-infrared to characterise the stellar populations of these regions and study the star formation process in an extreme environment such as the tails of stripped gas embedded in the hot intracluster medium. The colour, spectral energy distribution (SED), and linear size consistently indicate that these regions are coeval and have been formed after a single burst of star formation that occurred ~< 100 Myr ago. These regions might become free floating objects within the cluster potential well, and be the local analogues of compact sources produced after the interaction of gas-rich systems that occurred during the early formation of clusters.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band H$\alpha$+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the CFHT. During pilot observations we have observed NGC 4330, an intermediate mass, edge-on star forming spiral currently falling into the core of the Virgo cluster. New deep observations revealed a low surface brightness 10 kpc tail exhibiting a peculiar filamentary structure. The filaments are remarkably parallel one another and clearly indicate the direction of motion of the galaxy in the Virgo potential. Motivated by the detection of these features, indicating ongoing gas stripping, we collected literature photometry in 15 bands from the far-UV to the far-IR and deep optical long slit spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Using a newly developed Monte Carlo code that jointly fits spectroscopy and photometry, we reconstructed the star formation histories in apertures along the major axis of the galaxy. Our results have been validated against the output of CIGALE, a fitting code which has been previously used for similar studies. We found a clear outside-in gradient with radius of the time when the quenching event started: the outermost radii have been stripped 500 Myr ago, while the stripping has reached the inner 5 kpc from the center in the last 100 Myr. Regions at even smaller radii are currently still forming stars fueled by the presence of HI and H2 gas. When compared to statistical studies of the quenching timescales in the local Universe we find that ram pressure stripping of the cold gas is an effective mechanism to reduce the transformation times for galaxies falling into massive clusters. Future systematic studies of all the active galaxies observed by VESTIGE in the Virgo cluster will extend these results to a robust statistical framework.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • Gemini's Fast Turnaround program is intended to greatly decrease the time from having an idea to acquiring the supporting data. The scheme will offer monthly proposal submission opportunities, and proposals will be reviewed by the principal investigators or co-investigators of other proposals submitted during the same round. Here, we set out the design of the system and outline the plan for its implementation, leading to the launch of a pilot program at Gemini North in January 2015.
  • The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS) comprises an HI-selected sample of 155 galaxies spanning all morphological types with distances less than 25 Mpc. We describe the scientific goals of the survey, the sample selection, and the observing strategy. We also present an atlas and analysis of the CO J=3-2 maps for the 47 galaxies in the NGLS which are also part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We find a wide range of molecular gas mass fractions in the galaxies in this sample and explore the correlation of the far-infrared luminosity, which traces star formation, with the CO luminosity, which traces the molecular gas mass. By comparing the NGLS data with merging galaxies at low and high redshift which have also been observed in the CO J=3-2 line, we show that the correlation of far-infrared and CO luminosity shows a significant trend with luminosity. This trend is consistent with a molecular gas depletion time which is more than an order of magnitude faster in the merger galaxies than in nearby normal galaxies. We also find a strong correlation of the L(FIR)/L(CO3-2) ratio with the atomic to molecular gas mass ratio. This correlation suggests that some of the far-infrared emission originates from dust associated with atomic gas and that its contribution is particularly important in galaxies where most of the gas is in the atomic phase.
  • Millimeter and mid-infrared observations have been made of the dense clumps of dust and gas and of young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with the bright, compact submillimeter source G79.3+0.3 P1 in the relatively nearby MSX infrared-dark cloud G79.3+0.3. The Gemini mid-infrared observations reported here indicate the presence of three YSOs within the cloud. BIMA 3 mm continuum observations show that the brightest of the YSOs is likely to be a Herbig Ae/Be star. High-angular-resolution molecular-line observations suggest that a wind from this star may be triggering collapse in the adjacent molecular cloud. The submillimeter source G79.3+0.3 P1 itself does not contain infrared sources and may represent an earlier stage of star formation.
  • The Canadian Large Adaptive Reflector (CLAR) is a proposed prototype of a new concept for large, filled-aperture radio telescopes. The prototype would have a 300-metre aperture, working up to frequencies of at least 1.4 GHz, and would be equipped with a multi-beam phased array providing a field-of-view of 0.8deg at that frequency. The largest fully-steerable radio telescope in the world, and endowed with a large field-of-view, the CLAR will be uniquely suited for deep spectral imaging over large areas of the sky. Conducted over a period of three to four years, a CLAR Northern-Sky Survey would allow us to simultaneously: survey at arcminute scales the distribution and kinematics of the faint HI in the halo of the Milky Way and High Velocity Clouds; chart the large scale distribution of galaxies in HI out to redshift close to 1; reveal the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web responsible for wide-spread Lyman $\alpha$ absorption systems; image the signal of the reionization of the Universe over a large area with resolution of 10's of arcminutes.
  • Some hot, massive, population-I Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars of the carbon subclass are known to be prolific dust-producers. How dust can form in such a hostile environment remains a mystery. Here we report the discovery of a relatively cool, extended, multi-arc dust envelope around the star WR112, most likely formed by wind-wind collision in a long-period binary system. We derive the binary orbital parameters, the dust temperature and the dust mass distributions in the envelope. We find that amorphous carbon is a main constituent of the dust, in agreement with earlier estimates and theoretical predictions. However, the characteristic size of the dust grains is estimated to be ~1 micron, significantly larger than theoretical limits. The dust production rate is 6.1*10^[-7] M_Sun / yr and the total detectable dust mass is found to be about 2.8*10^[-5] M_Sun (for d=4.15 kpc). We also show that, despite the hostile environment, at least ~20% of the initially-formed dust may reach the interstellar medium.