• Various aspects of self-motility of chemically active colloids in Newtonian fluids can be captured by simple models for their chemical activity plus a phoretic slip hydrodynamic boundary condition on their surface. For particles of simple shapes (e.g., spheres) -- as employed in many experimental studies -- which move at very low Reynolds numbers in an unbounded fluid, such models of chemically active particles effectively map onto the well studied so-called hydrodynamic squirmers [S. Michelin and E. Lauga, J. Fluid Mech. \textbf{747}, 572 (2014)]. Accordingly, intuitively appealing analogies of "pusher/puller/neutral" squirmers arise naturally. Within the framework of self-diffusiophoresis we illustrate the above mentioned mapping and the corresponding flows in an unbounded fluid for a number of choices of the activity function (i.e., the spatial distribution and the type of chemical reactions across the surface of the particle). We use the central collision of two active particles as a simple, paradigmatic case for demonstrating that in the presence of other particles or boundaries the behavior of chemically active colloids may be \textit{qualitatively} different, even in the far field, from the one exhibited by the corresponding "effective squirmer", obtained from the mapping in an unbounded fluid. This emphasizes that understanding the collective behavior and the dynamics under geometrical confinement of chemically active particles necessarily requires to explicitly account for the dependence of the hydrodynamic interactions on the distribution of chemical species resulting from the activity of the particles.
  • A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • The influence of a chemically or electrically heterogeneous distribution of interaction sites at a planar substrate on the number density of an adjacent fluid is studied by means of classical density functional theory (DFT). In the case of electrolyte solutions the effect of this heterogeneity is particularly long ranged, because the corresponding relevant length scale is set by the Debye length which is large compared to molecular sizes. The DFT used here takes the solvent particles explicitly into account and thus captures phenomena, inter alia, due to ion-solvent coupling. The present approach provides closed analytic expressions describing the influence of chemically and electrically nonuniform walls. The analysis of isolated \delta-like interactions, isolated interaction patches, and hexagonal periodic distributions of interaction sites reveals a sensitive dependence of the fluid density profiles on the type of the interaction, as well as on the size and the lateral distribution of the interaction sites.
  • The influence of a fluid-fluid interface on self-phoresis of chemically active, axially symmetric, spherical colloids is analyzed. Distinct from the studies of self-phoresis for colloids trapped at fluid interfaces or in the vicinity of hard walls, here we focus on the issue of self-phoresis close to a fluid-fluid interface. In order to provide physically intuitive results highlighting the role played by the interface, the analysis is carried out for the case that the symmetry axis of the colloid is normal to the interface; moreover, thermal fluctuations are not taken into account. Similarly to what has been observed near hard walls, we find that such colloids can be set into motion even if their whole surface is homogeneously active. This is due to the anisotropy along the direction normal to the interface owing to the partitioning by diffusion, among the coexisting fluid phases, of the product of the chemical reaction taking place at the colloid surface. Different from results corresponding to hard walls, in the case of a fluid interface the direction of motion, i.e., towards the interface or away from it, can be controlled by tuning the physical properties of one of the two fluid phases. This effect is analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively, both by resorting to a far-field approximation and via an exact, analytical calculation which provides the means for a critical assessment of the approximate analysis.
  • Using mesoscopic numerical simulations and analytical theory we investigate the coarsening of the solvent structure around a colloidal particle emerging after a temperature quench of the colloid surface. Qualitative differences in the coarsening mechanisms are found, depending on the composition of the binary liquid mixture forming the solvent and on the adsorption preferences of the colloid. For an adsorptionwise neutral colloid, as function of time the phase being next to its surface alternates. This behavior sets in on the scale of the relaxation time of the solvent and is absent for colloids with strong adsorption preferences. A Janus colloid, with a small temperature difference between its two hemispheres, reveals an asymmetric structure formation and surface enrichment around it, even if the solvent is within its one-phase region and if the temperature of the colloid is above the critical demixing temperature $T_c$ of the solvent. Our phenomenological model turns out to capture recent experimental findings according to which, upon laser illumination of a Janus colloid and due to the ensuing temperature gradient between its two hemispheres, the surrounding binary liquid mixture develops a concentration gradient.
  • Self-phoretic Janus particles move by inducing -- via non-equilibrium chemical reactions occurring on their surfaces -- changes in the chemical composition of the solution in which they are immersed. This process leads to gradients in chemical composition along the surface of the particle, as well as along any nearby boundaries, including solid walls. Chemical gradients along a wall can give rise to chemi-osmosis, i.e., the gradients drive surface flows which, in turn, drive flow in the volume of the solution. This bulk flow couples back to the particle, and thus contributes to its self-motility. Since chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing molecular species and the wall, the response flow induced and experienced by a particle encodes information about any chemical patterning of the wall. Here, we extend previous studies on self-phoresis of a sphere near a chemically patterned wall to the case of particles with elongated shape. We focus our analysis on the new phenomenology potentially emerging from the coupling -- which is inoperative for a spherical shape -- of the elongated particle to the strain rate tensor of the chemi-osmotic flow. Via numerical calculations, we show that the dynamics of a rod-like particle exhibits a novel "edge-following" steady state: the particle translates along the edge of a chemical step at a steady distance from the step and with a steady orientation. Within a certain range of system parameters, the edge-following state co-exists with a "docking" state (the particle stops at the step, oriented perpendicular to the step edge), i.e., a bistable dynamics occurs. These findings are rationalized as a consequence of the competition between fluid vorticity and the rate of strain by using analytical theory based on the point-particle approximation which captures quasi-quantitatively the dynamics of the system.
  • The effect of imposing a constraint on a fluctuating scalar order parameter field in a system of finite volume is studied within statistical field theory. The canonical ensemble, corresponding to a fixed total integrated order parameter, is obtained as a special case of the theory. A perturbative expansion is developed which allows one to systematically determine the constraint-induced finite-volume corrections to the free energy and to correlation functions. In particular, we focus on the Landau-Ginzburg model in a film geometry (i.e., a rectangular parallelepiped with a small aspect ratio) with periodic, Dirichlet, or Neumann boundary conditions in the transverse direction and periodic boundary conditions in the remaining, lateral directions. Within the expansion in terms of $\epsilon=4-d$, where $d$ is the spatial dimension of the bulk, the finite-size contribution to the free energy and the associated critical Casimir force are calculated to leading order in $\epsilon$ and are compared to the corresponding expressions for an unconstrained (grand canonical) system. The constraint restricts the fluctuations within the system and it accordingly modifies the residual finite-size free energy. The resulting Casimir force is shown to depend on whether it is defined by assuming a fixed transverse area or a fixed total volume. In the former case, the constraint is typically found to significantly enhance the attractive character of the force as compared to the grand canonical case. In contrast to the grand canonical Casimir force, which, for supercritical temperatures, vanishes in the limit of thick films, the canonical Casimir force defined for fixed transverse area attains for thick films a negative value for all boundary conditions studied here. Typically, the dependence of the Casimir force both on the temperature- and on the field-like scaling variables is different in the two ensembles.
  • Within mean field theory, we investigate the bridging transition between a pair of parallel cylindrical colloids immersed in a binary liquid mixture as a solvent which is close to its critical consolute point $T_c$. We determine the universal scaling functions of the effective potential and of the force between the colloids. For a solvent which is at the critical concentration and close to $T_c$, we find that the critical Casimir force is the dominant interaction at close separations. This agrees very well with the corresponding Derjaguin approximation for the effective interaction between the two cylinders, while capillary forces originating from the extension of the liquid bridge turn out to be more important at large separations. In addition, we are able to infer from the wetting characteristics of the individual colloids the first-order transition of the liquid bridge connecting two colloidal particles to the ruptured state. While specific to cylindrical colloids, the results presented here provide also an outline for identifying critical Casimir forces acting on bridged colloidal particles as such, and for analyzing the bridging transition between them.
  • Within the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) approach electrolytes in contact with planar, spherical, and cylindrical electrodes are analyzed systematically. The dependences of their capacitance $C$ on the surface charge density $\sigma$ and the ionic strength $I$ are examined as function of the wall curvature. The surface charge density has a strong effect on the capacitance for small curvatures whereas for large curvatures the behavior becomes independent of $\sigma$. An expansion for small curvatures gives rise to capacitance coefficients which depend only on a single parameter, allowing for a convenient analysis. The universal behavior at large curvatures can be captured by an analytic expression.
  • Density functional theory is used to describe electrolyte solutions in contact with electrodes of planar or spherical shape. For the electrolyte solutions we consider the so-called civilized model, in which all species present are treated on equal footing. This allows us to discuss the features of the electric double layer in terms of the differential capacitance. The model provides insight into the microscopic structure of the electric double layer, which goes beyond the mesoscopic approach studied in the accompanying paper. This enables us to judge the relevance of microscopic details, such as the radii of the particles forming the electrolyte solutions or the dipolar character of the solvent particles, and to compare the predictions of various models. Similar to the preceding paper, a general behavior is observed for small radii of the electrode in that in this limit the results become independent of the surface charge density and of the particle radii. However, for large electrode radii non-trivial behaviors are observed. Especially the particle radii and the surface charge density strongly influence the capacitance. From the comparison with the Poisson-Boltzmann approach it becomes apparent that the shape of the electrode determines whether the microscopic details of the full civilized model have to be taken into account or whether already simpler models yield acceptable predictions.
  • We investigate the effect of quenched surface disorder on effective interactions between two planar surfaces immersed in fluids which are near criticality and belong to the Ising bulk universality class. We consider the case that, in the absence of random surface fields, the surfaces of the film belong to the surface universality class of the so-called ordinary transition. We find analytically that in the linear weak-coupling regime, i.e., upon including the mean-field contribution and Gaussian fluctuations, the presence of random surface fields with zero mean leads to an attractive, disorder-induced contribution to the critical Casimir interactions between the two confining surfaces. Our analytical, field-theoretic results are compared with corresponding Monte Carlo simulation data.
  • We study a mesoscopic model of a chemically active colloidal particle which on certain parts of its surface promotes chemical reactions in the surrounding solution. For reasons of simplicity and conceptual clarity, we focus on the case in which only electrically neutral species are present in the solution and on chemical reactions which are described by first order kinetics. Within a self-consistent approach we explicitly determine the steady state product and reactant number density fields around the colloid as functionals of the interaction potentials of the various molecular species in solution with the colloid. By using Teubner's reciprocal theorem, this allows us to compute and to interpret -- in a transparent way in terms of the classical Smoluchowski theory of chemical kinetics -- the external force needed to keep such a catalytically active colloid at rest (\textit{stall} force) or, equivalently, the corresponding velocity of the colloid \textit{if} it is free to move. We use the particular case of triangular-well interaction potentials as a benchmark example for applying the general theoretical framework developed here. For this latter case, we derive explicit expressions for the dependences of the quantities of interest on the diffusion coefficients of the chemical species, the reaction rate constant, the coverage by catalyst, the size of the colloid, as well as on the parameters of the interaction potentials. These expressions provide a detailed picture of the phenomenology associated with catalytically-active colloids and self-diffusiophoresis.
  • Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.
  • Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g., the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate "point-particle" analysis, we show analytically that -- owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall -- such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial "swimmers" exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change in the environment. We show that the alignment with the surface-chemistry gradient is generic for chemically active colloids as long as they exhibit motility in an unbounded fluid, i.e., this phenomenon does not depend on the exact details of the propulsion mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of simple models of chemical activity, corresponding to Janus particles with "source" chemical reactions on one half of the surface and either "inert" or "sink" reactions over the other half.
  • The effective electrostatic interaction between a pair of colloids, both of them located close to each other at an electrolyte interface, is studied by employing the full, nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory within classical density functional theory. Using a simplified yet appropriate model, all contributions to the effective interaction are obtained exactly, albeit numerically. The comparison between our results and those obtained within linearized PB theory reveals that the latter overestimates these contributions significantly at short inter-particle separations. Whereas the surface contributions to the linear and the nonlinear PB results differ only quantitatively, the line contributions show qualitative differences at short separations. Moreover, a dependence of the line contribution on the solvation properties of the two adjacent fluids is found, which is absent within the linear theory. Our results are expected to enrich the understanding of effective interfacial interactions between colloids.
  • Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the 3D Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a non-integrable divergence of the mean field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not.
  • Chemically active colloids generate changes in the chemical composition of their surrounding solution and thereby induce flows in the ambient fluid which affect their dynamical evolution. Here we study the many-body dynamics of a monolayer of active particles trapped at a fluid-fluid interface. To this end we consider a mean-field model which incorporates the direct pair interaction (including also the capillary interaction which is caused specifically by the interfacial trapping) as well as the effect of hydrodynamic interactions (including the Marangoni flow induced by the response of the interface to the chemical activity). The values of the relevant physical parameters for typical experimental realizations of such systems are estimated and various scenarios, which are predicted by our approach for the dynamics of the monolayer, are discussed. In particular, we show that the chemically-induced Marangoni flow can prevent the clustering instability driven by the capillary attraction.
  • The dynamic and static critical behavior of five binary Lennard-Jones liquid mixtures, close to their continuous demixing points (belonging to the so-called model H' dynamic universality class), are studied computationally by combining semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, accelerated by graphic processing units (GPU). The symmetric binary liquid mixtures considered cover a variety of densities, a wide range of compressibilities, and various interactions between the unlike particles. The static quantities studied here encompass the bulk phase diagram (including both the binodal and the $\lambda$-line), the correlation length, the concentration susceptibility, the compressibility of the finite-sized systems at the bulk critical temperature $T_c$, and the pressure. Concerning the collective transport properties, we focus on the Onsager coefficient and the shear viscosity. The critical power-law singularities of these quantities are analyzed in the mixed phase (above $T_c$) and non-universal critical amplitudes are extracted. Two universal amplitude ratios are calculated. The first one involves static amplitudes only and agrees well with the expectations for the three-dimensional Ising universality class. The second ratio includes also dynamic critical amplitudes and is related to the Einstein--Kawasaki relation for the interdiffusion constant. Precise estimates of this amplitude ratio are difficult to obtain from MD simulations, but within the error bars our results are compatible with theoretical predictions and experimental values for model H'. Evidence is reported for an inverse proportionality of the pressure and the isothermal compressibility at the demixing transition, upon varying either the number density or the repulsion strength between unlike particles.
  • Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory, and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate.
  • At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration ($< 100 \mathrm {\mu s}$), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/$\mathrm{km^2}$/year) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.
  • Recently there is strong experimental and theoretical interest in studying the self-assembly and the phase behavior of patchy and of Janus particles, which form colloidal suspensions. Although in this quest a variety of effective interactions have been proposed and used in order to achieve directed assembly, the critical Casimir effect stands out as being particularly suitable in this respect because it provides both attractive and repulsive interactions as well as the potential of a sensitive temperature control of their strength. Specifically, we have calculated the critical Casimir force between a single Janus particle and a laterally homogeneous substrate as well as a substrate with a chemical step. We have used the Derjaguin approximation and compared it with results from full mean field theory. A modification of the Derjaguin approximation turns out to be generally reliable. Based on this approach we have derived the effective force and the effective potential between two Janus cylinders as well as between two Janus spheres.
  • For active particles the interplay between the self-generated hydrodynamic flow and an external shear flow, especially near bounding surfaces, can result in a rich behavior of the particles not easily foreseen from the consideration of the active and external driving mechanisms in isolation. For instance, under certain conditions, the particles exhibit "rheotaxis," i.e., they align their direction of motion with the plane of shear spanned by the direction of the flow and the normal of the bounding surface and move with or against the flow. To date, studies of rheotaxis have focused on elongated particles (e.g., spermatozoa), for which rheotaxis can be understood intuitively in terms of a "weather vane" mechanism. Here we investigate the possibility that spherical active particles, for which the "weather vane" mechanism is excluded due to the symmetry of the shape, may nevertheless exhibit rheotaxis. Combining analytical and numerical calculations, we show that, for a broad class of spherical active particles, rheotactic behavior may emerge via a mechanism which involves "self-trapping" near a hard wall owing to the active propulsion of the particles, combined with their rotation, alignment, and "locking" of the direction of motion into the shear plane. In this state, the particles move solely up- or downstream at a steady height and orientation.
  • Micron-sized particles moving through solution in response to self-generated chemical gradients serve as model systems for studying active matter. Their far-reaching potential applications will require the particles to sense and respond to their local environment in a robust manner. The self-generated hydrodynamic and chemical fields, which induce particle motion, probe and are modified by that very environment, including confining boundaries. Focusing on a catalytically active Janus particle as a paradigmatic example, we predict that near a hard planar wall such a particle exhibits several scenarios of motion: reflection from the wall, motion at a steady-state orientation and height above the wall, or motionless, steady "hovering." Concerning the steady states, the height and the orientation are determined both by the proportion of catalyst coverage and the interactions of the solutes with the different "faces" of the particle. Accordingly, we propose that a desired behavior can be selected by tuning these parameters via a judicious design of the particle surface chemistry.
  • If an active Janus particle is trapped at the interface between a liquid and a fluid, its self-propelled motion along the interface is affected by a net torque on the particle due to the viscosity contrast between the two adjacent fluid phases. For a simple model of an active, spherical Janus colloid we analyze the conditions under which translation occurs along the interface and we provide estimates of the corresponding persistence length. We show that under certain conditions the persistence length of such a particle is significantly larger than the corresponding one in the bulk liquid, which is in line with the trends observed in recent experimental studies.
  • The three-phase contact line formed by the intersection of a liquid-vapor interface of an electrolyte solution with a charged planar substrate is studied in terms of classical density functional theory applied to a lattice model. The influence of the substrate charge density and of the ionic strength of the solution on the intrinsic structure of the three-phase contact line and on the corresponding line tension is analyzed. We find a negative line tension for all values of the surface charge density and of the ionic strength considered. The strength of the line tension decreases upon decreasing the contact angle via varying either the temperature or the substrate charge density.