• In this paper, new upper limits on the parameters of the Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) collapse model are extracted. To this end, the X-ray emission data collected by the IGEX collaboration are analyzed and compared with the spectrum of the spontaneous photon emission process predicted by collapse models. This study allows the obtainment of the most stringent limits within a relevant range of the CSL model parameters, with respect to any other method. The collapse rate $\lambda$ and the correlation length $r_C$ are mapped, thus allowing the exclusion of a broad range of the parameter space.
  • By performing X-rays measurements in the "cosmic silence" of the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso, LNGS-INFN, we test a basic principle of quantum mechanics: the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP), for electrons. We present the achieved results of the VIP experiment and the ongoing VIP2 measurement aiming to gain two orders of magnitude improvement in testing PEP. We also use a similar experimental technique to search for radiation (X and gamma) predicted by continuous spontaneous localization models, which aim to solve the "measurement problem".
  • We are experimentally investigating possible violations of standard quantum mechanics predictions in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy. We test with high precision the Pauli Exclusion Principle and the collapse of the wave function (collapse models). We present our method of searching for possible small violations of the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) for electrons, through the search for anomalous X-ray transitions in copper atoms. These transitions are produced by new electrons (brought inside the copper bar by circulating current) which can have the possibility to undergo Pauli-forbidden transition to the 1s level already occupied by two electrons. We describe the VIP2 (VIolation of the Pauli Exclusion Principle) experimental data taking at the Gran Sasso underground laboratories. The goal of VIP2 is to test the PEP for electrons in agreement with the Messiah-Greenberg superselection rule with unprecedented accuracy, down to a limit in the probability that PEP is violated at the level of 10E-31. We show preliminary experimental results and discuss implications of a possible violation.
  • A recent experiment [K. C. Lee et al., Science 334, 1253 (2011)] succeeded in detecting entanglement between two macroscopic specks of diamonds, separated by a macroscopic distance, at room temperature. This impressive results is a further confirmation of the validity of quantum theory in (at least parts of) the mesoscopic and macroscopic domain, and poses a challenge to collapse models, which predict a violation of the quantum superposition principle, which is the bigger the larger the system. We analyze the experiment in the light of such models. We will show that the bounds placed by experimental data are weaker than those coming from matter-wave interferometry and non-interferometric tests of collapse models.
  • We present the idea of searching for X-rays as a signature of the mechanism inducing the spontaneous collapse of the wave function. Such a signal is predicted by the continuous spontaneous localization theories, which are solving the "measurement problem" by modifying the Schrodinger equation. We will show some encouraging preliminary results and discuss future plans and strategy.
  • We show under which conditions a particle scatters coherently on a multi-particles system, working in the non relativistic framework. In a nutshell, in order to have coherent scattering, the incident particle has to not resolve the internal structure of the composite system. We show that the above condition is satisfied when the de Broglie length of the incident particle is much larger than the size of the system.
  • We compute the spectrum of emitted radiation by a generic quantum system interacting with an external classic noise. Our motivation is to understand this phenomenon within the framework of collapse models. However the computation is general and applies practically to any situation where a quantum system interacts with a noise. The computation is carried out at a perturbative level. This poses problems concerning the correct way of performing the analysis, as repeatedly discussed in the literature. We will clarify also this issue.
  • The development of mathematically complete and consistent models solving the so-called "measurement problem", strongly renewed the interest of the scientific community for the foundations of quantum mechanics, among these the Dynamical Reduction Models posses the unique characteristic to be experimentally testable. In the first part of the paper an upper limit on the reduction rate parameter of such models will be obtained, based on the analysis of the X-ray spectrum emitted by an isolated slab of germanium and measured by the IGEX experiment. The second part of the paper is devoted to present the results of the VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment and to describe its recent upgrade. The VIP experiment established a limit on the probability that the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) is violated by electrons, using the very clean method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper.
  • Spontaneous photon emission in the Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) model is studied one more time. In the CSL model each particle interacts with a noise field that induces the collapse of its wave function. As a consequence of this interaction, when the particle is electrically charged, it radiates. As discussed in [1], the formula for the emission rate, to first perturbative order, contains two terms: One is proportional to the Fourier component of the noise field at the same frequency as that of the emitted photon and one is proportional to the zero Fourier component of the noise field. As discussed in previous works, this second term seems unphysical. In [1], it was shown that the unphysical term disappears when the noises is confined to a bounded region and the final particle's state is a wave packet. Here we investigate the origin of the unphysical term and why it vanishes according to the previous prescription. For this purpose, the electrodynamic part of the equation of motion is solved exactly while the part due to the noise is treated perturbatively. We show that the unphysical term is connected to exponentially decaying function of time which dies out in the large time limit, however, approximates to 1 in the first perturbative order in the electromagnetic field.
  • We compute the effect of collapse models on neutrino oscillations. The effect of the collapse is to modify the evolution of the `spatial' part of the wave function, which indirectly amounts to a change on the flavor components. In many respects, this phenomenon is similar to neutrino propagation through matter. For the analysis we use the mass proportional CSL model, and perform the calculation to second order perturbation theory. As we will show, the CSL prediction is very small - mainly due to the very small mass of neutrinos - and practically undetectable.
  • Collapse models provide a theoretical framework for understanding how classical world emerges from quantum mechanics. Their dynamics preserves (practically) quantum linearity for microscopic systems, while it becomes strongly nonlinear when moving towards macroscopic scale. The conventional approach to test collapse models is to create spatial superpositions of mesoscopic systems and then examine the loss of interference, while environmental noises are engineered carefully. Here we investigate a different approach: We study systems that naturally oscillate --creating quantum superpositions-- and thus represent a natural case-study for testing quantum linearity: neutrinos, neutral mesons, and chiral molecules. We will show how spontaneous collapses affect their oscillatory behavior, and will compare them with environmental decoherence effects. We will show that, contrary to what previously predicted, collapse models cannot be tested with neutrinos. The effect is stronger for neutral mesons, but still beyond experimental reach. Instead, chiral molecules can offer promising candidates for testing collapse models.
  • Collapse models predict the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, in order to avoid the emergence of macroscopic superpositions. In their mass-dependent formulation they claim that the collapse of any system's wave function depends on its mass. Neutral K, D, B mesons are oscillating systems that are given by Nature as superposition of different mass eigenstates. Thus they are unique and interesting systems to look at, for analyzing the experimental implications of such models, so far in agreement with all known experiments. In this paper we derive - for the single mesons and bipartite entangled mesons - the effect of the mass-proportional CSL collapse model on the dynamics on neutral mesons, including the relativistic effects. We compare the theoretical prediction with experimental data from different accelerator facilities.