• Large scale surveys have brought about a revolution in astronomy. To analyse the resulting wealth of data, we need automated tools to identify, classify, and quantify the important underlying structures. We present here a method for classifying and quantifying a pixelated structure, based on its principal moments of inertia. The method enables us to automatically detect, and objectively compare, centrally condensed cores, elongated filaments and hollow rings. We illustrate the method by applying it to (i) observations of surface-density from Hi-GAL, and (ii) simulations of filament growth in a turbulent medium. We limit the discussion here to 2D data; in a future paper we will extend the method to 3D data.
  • Hi-GAL is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 $\mu$m. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogs presented in Molinari et al. (2016a), covering the portion of Galactic plane $-71.0^{\circ}< \ell < 67.0^{\circ}$. The band-merged catalogue contains 100922 sources with a regular SED, 24584 of which show a 70 $\mu$m counterpart and are thus considered proto-stellar, while the remainder are considered starless. Thanks to this huge number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterise different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in proto-stellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to proto-stellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between "on-arm" and "inter-arm" positions.
  • Many young star clusters appear to be fractal, i.e. they appear to be concentrated in a nested hierarchy of clusters within clusters. We present a new algorithm for statistically analysing the distribution of stars to quantify the level of sub-structure. We suggest that, even at the simplest level, the internal structure of a fractal cluster requires the specification of three parameters. (i) The 3D fractal dimension, $\mathcal{D}$, measures the extent to which the clusters on one level of the nested hierarchy fill the volume of their parent cluster. (ii) The number of levels, $\mathcal{L}$, reflects the finite ratio between the linear size of the large root-cluster at the top of the hierarchy, and the smallest leaf-clusters at the bottom of the hierarchy. (iii) The volume-density scaling exponent, $\mathcal{C}=-\textrm{d}\ln[\delta n]/\textrm{d}\ln[L]$ measures the factor by which the excess density, $\delta n$, in a structure of scale $L$, exceeds that of the background formed by larger structures; it is similar, but not exactly equivalent, to the exponent in Larson's scaling relation between density and size for molecular clouds. We describe an algorithm which can be used to constrain the values of $({\cal D},{\cal L},{\cal C})$ and apply this method to artificial and observed clusters. We show that this algorithm is able to reliably describe the three dimensional structure of an artificial star cluster from the two dimensional projection, and quantify the varied structures observed in real and simulated clusters.
  • We present the results of SPH simulations in which two clouds, each having mass $M_{_{\rm{o}}}\!=\!500\,{\rm M}_{_\odot}$ and radius $R_{_{\rm{o}}}\!=\!2\,{\rm pc}$, collide head-on at relative velocities of $\Delta v_{_{\rm{o}}} =2.4,\;2.8,\;3.2,\;3.6\;{\rm and}\;4.0\,{\rm km}\,{\rm s}^{-1}$. There is a clear trend with increasing $\Delta v_{_{\rm{o}}}$. At low $\Delta v_{_{\rm{o}}}$, star formation starts later, and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into an array of predominantly radial filaments; stars condense out of these filaments and fall, together with residual gas, towards the centre of the layer, to form a single large-$N$ cluster, which then evolves by competitive accretion, producing one or two very massive protostars and a diaspora of ejected (mainly low-mass) protostars; the pattern of filaments is reminiscent of the hub and spokes systems identified recently by observers. At high $\Delta v_{_{\rm{o}}}$, star formation occurs sooner and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into a network of filaments; the pattern of filaments here is more like a spider's web, with several small-$N$ clusters forming independently of one another, in cores at the intersections of filaments, and since each core only spawns a small number of protostars, there are fewer ejections of protostars. As the relative velocity is increased, the {\it mean} protostellar mass increases, but the {\it maximum} protostellar mass and the width of the mass function both decrease. We use a Minimal Spanning Tree to analyse the spatial distributions of protostars formed at different relative velocities.