• A wide variety of ring-like dust structures has been detected in protoplanetary disks, but their origin and frequency are still unclear. We characterize the structure of an extended, multi-ringed disk discovered serendipitously in the ALMA Lupus disk survey and put it in the context of the Lupus disk population. ALMA observations in Band 6 at 234 GHz and Band 7 at 328 GHz at 0.3" resolution toward the K6 star V1094 Sco in Lupus III are presented, and its disk structure is analyzed. The spectral index $\alpha_{mm}$ is determined in the inner 150 AU of the disk. The ALMA continuum data show a very extended disk with two gap/ring pairs. The gaps are located at 100 AU and 170 AU, the bright rings at 130 AU and 220 AU. Continuum emission is detected out to a 300 AU distance, similar to IM Lup but a factor of 5 larger than typically found for Lupus disks at this sensitivity and resolution. The bright central region of the disk (within 35 AU) is possibly optically thick at 1 mm wavelengths, and has a brightness temperature of only 13 K. The spectral index increases between the inner disk and the first ring, at the location of the first gap. Due to the low temperature of the disk midplane, snow lines can be excluded as the drivers behind the ring and gap formation in this disk. Disks the size of V1094 Sco are rare, and only 2.1+-1.5% of disks in Lupus show continuum emission beyond 200 AU. Possible connections between the large primordial disk population, transition disks, and exoplanets are discussed.
  • We present ALMA Band 6 observations of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young (1-3 Myr) Lupus star-forming region, covering the 1.33 mm continuum and the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J=2-1 lines. The spatial resolution is 0.25 arcsec with a medium 3-sigma continuum sensitivity of 0.30 mJy, corresponding to M_dust ~ 0.2 M_earth. We apply "Keplerian masking" to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of our 12CO zero-moment maps, enabling measurements of gas disk radii for 22 Lupus disks; we find that gas disks are universally larger than mm dust disks by a factor of two on average, likely due to a combination of the optically thick gas emission as well as the growth and inward drift of the dust. Using the gas disk radii, we calculate the dimensionless viscosity parameter, alpha_visc, finding a broad distribution and no correlations with other disk or stellar parameters, suggesting that viscous processes have not yet established quasi-steady states in Lupus disks. By combining our 1.33 mm continuum fluxes with our previous 890 micron continuum observations, we also calculate the mm spectral index, alpha_mm, for 70 Lupus disks; we find an anti-correlation between alpha_mm and mm flux for low-mass disks (M_dust < 5), followed by a flattening as disks approach alpha_mm = 2, which could indicate faster grain growth in higher-mass disks, but may also reflect their larger optically thick components. In sum, this work demonstrates the continuous stream of new insights into disk evolution and planet formation that can be gleaned from unbiased ALMA disk surveys.
  • Disk warps around classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) can periodically obscure the central star for some viewing geometries. For these so-called AA Tau-like variables, the obscuring material is located in the inner disk and absorption spectroscopy allows one to characterize its dust and gas content. Since the observed emission from CTTS consists of several components (photospheric, accretion, jet, and disk emission), which can all vary with time, it is generally challenging to disentangling disk features from emission variability. Multi-epoch, flux-calibrated, broadband spectra provide us with the necessary information to cleanly separate absorption from emission variability. We applied this method to three epochs of VLT/X-Shooter spectra of the CTTS V354 Mon (CSI Mon-660) located in NGC 2264 and find that: (a) the accretion emission remains virtually unchanged between the three epochs; (b) the broadband flux evolution is best described by disk material obscuring part of the star, and (c) the Na and K gas absorption lines show only a minor increase in equivalent width during phases of high dust extinction. The limits on the absorbing gas column densities indicate a low gas-to-dust ratio in the inner disk, less than a tenth of the ISM value. We speculate that the evolutionary state of V354 Mon, rather old with a low accretion rate, is responsible for the dust excess through an evolution toward a dust dominated disk or through the fragmentation of larger bodies that drifted inward from larger radii in a still gas dominated disk.
  • Protoplanetary discs around brown dwarfs and very low mass stars offer some of the best prospects for forming Earth-sized planets in their habitable zones. To this end, we study the nature of the disc around the very low mass star V410 X-ray 1, whose SED is indicative of an optically thick and very truncated dust disc, with our modelling suggesting an outer radius of only 0.6 au. We investigate two scenarios that could lead to such a truncation, and find that the observed SED is compatible with both. The first scenario involves the truncation of both the dust and gas in the disc, perhaps due to a previous dynamical interaction or the presence of an undetected companion. The second scenario involves the fact that a radial location of 0.6 au is close to the expected location of the H$_2$O snowline in the disc. As such, a combination of efficient dust growth, radial migration, and subsequent fragmentation within the snowline leads to an optically thick inner dust disc and larger, optically thin outer dust disc. We find that a firm measurement of the CO $J=2$--1 line flux would enable us to distinguish between these two scenarios, by enabling a measurement of the radial extent of gas in the disc. Many models we consider contain at least several Earth-masses of dust interior to 0.6 au, suggesting that V410 X-ray 1 could be a precursor to a system with tightly-packed inner planets, such as TRAPPIST-1.
  • Bright ring-like structure emission of the CN molecule has been observed in protoplanetary disks. We investigate whether such structures are due to the morphology of the disk itself or if they are instead an intrinsic feature of CN emission. With the intention of using CN as a diagnostic, we also address to which physical and chemical parameters CN is most sensitive. A set of disk models were run for different stellar spectra, masses, and physical structures via the 2D thermochemical code DALI. An updated chemical network that accounts for the most relevant CN reactions was adopted. Ring-shaped emission is found to be a common feature of all adopted models; the highest abundance is found in the upper outer regions of the disk, and the column density peaks at 30-100 AU for T Tauri stars with standard accretion rates. Higher mass disks generally show brighter CN. Higher UV fields, such as those appropriate for T Tauri stars with high accretion rates or for Herbig Ae stars or for higher disk flaring, generally result in brighter and larger rings. These trends are due to the main formation paths of CN, which all start with vibrationally excited H2* molecules, that are produced through far ultraviolet (FUV) pumping of H2. The model results compare well with observed disk-integrated CN fluxes and the observed location of the CN ring for the TW Hya disk. CN rings are produced naturally in protoplanetary disks and do not require a specific underlying disk structure such as a dust cavity or gap. The strong link between FUV flux and CN emission can provide critical information regarding the vertical structure of the disk and the distribution of dust grains which affects the UV penetration, and could help to break some degeneracies in the SED fitting. In contrast with C2H or c-C3H2, the CN flux is not very sensitive to carbon and oxygen depletion.
  • HD$\,$169142 is an excellent target to investigate signs of planet-disk interaction due to the previous evidence of gap structures. We performed J-band (~1.2{\mu}m) polarized intensity imaging of HD169142 with VLT/SPHERE. We observe polarized scattered light down to 0.16" (~19 au) and find an inner gap with a significantly reduced scattered light flux. We confirm the previously detected double ring structure peaking at 0.18" (~21 au) and 0.56" (~66 au), and marginally detect a faint third gap at 0.70"-0.73" (~82-85 au). We explore dust evolution models in a disk perturbed by two giant planets, as well as models with a parameterized dust size distribution. The dust evolution model is able to reproduce the ring locations and gap widths in polarized intensity, but fails to reproduce their depths. It, however, gives a good match with the ALMA dust continuum image at 1.3 mm. Models with a parameterized dust size distribution better reproduce the gap depth in scattered light, suggesting that dust filtration at the outer edges of the gaps is less effective. The pile-up of millimeter grains in a dust trap and the continuous distribution of small grains throughout the gap likely require a more efficient dust fragmentation and dust diffusion in the dust trap. Alternatively, turbulence or charging effects might lead to a reservoir of small grains at the surface layer that is not affected by the dust growth and fragmentation cycle dominating the dense disk midplane. The exploration of models shows that extracting planet properties such as mass from observed gap profiles is highly degenerate.
  • We present multi-wavelength radio observations obtained with the VLA of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young brown dwarf 2MASS J04442713+2512164 (2M0444) in the Taurus star forming region. 2M0444 is the brightest known brown dwarf disk at millimeter wavelengths, making this an ideal target to probe radio emission from a young brown dwarf. Thermal emission from dust in the disk is detected at 6.8 and 9.1 mm, whereas the 1.36 cm measured flux is dominated by ionized gas emission. We combine these data with previous observations at shorter sub-mm and mm wavelengths to test the predictions of dust evolution models in gas-rich disks after adapting their parameters to the case of 2M0444. These models show that the radial drift mechanism affecting solids in a gaseous environment has to be either completely made inefficient, or significantly slowed down by very strong gas pressure bumps in order to explain the presence of mm/cm-sized grains in the outer regions of the 2M0444 disk. We also discuss the possible mechanisms for the origin of the ionized gas emission detected at 1.36 cm. The inferred radio luminosity for this emission is in line with the relation between radio and bolometric luminosity valid for for more massive and luminous young stellar objects, and extrapolated down to the very low luminosity of the 2M0444 brown dwarf.
  • Understanding the diversity of planets requires to study the morphology and the physical conditions in the protoplanetary disks in which they form. We observed and spatially resolved the disk around the ~10 Myr old protoplanetary disk HD 100453 in polarized scattered light with SPHERE/VLT at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, reaching an angular resolution of ~0.02", and an inner working angle of ~0.09". We detect polarized scattered light up to ~0.42" (~48 au) and detect a cavity, a rim with azimuthal brightness variations at an inclination of 38 degrees, two shadows and two symmetric spiral arms. The spiral arms originate near the location of the shadows, close to the semi major axis. We detect a faint spiral-like feature in the SW that can be interpreted as the scattering surface of the bottom side of the disk, if the disk is tidally truncated by the M-dwarf companion currently seen at a projected distance of ~119 au. We construct a radiative transfer model that accounts for the main characteristics of the features with an inner and outer disk misaligned by ~72 degrees. The azimuthal brightness variations along the rim are well reproduced with the scattering phase function of the model. While spirals can be triggered by the tidal interaction with the companion, the close proximity of the spirals to the shadows suggests that the shadows could also play a role. The change in stellar illumination along the rim, induces an azimuthal variation of the scale height that can contribute to the brightness variations. Dark regions in polarized images of transition disks are now detected in a handful of disks and often interpreted as shadows due to a misaligned inner disk. The origin of such a misalignment in HD 100453, and of the spirals, is unclear, and might be due to a yet-undetected massive companion inside the cavity, and on an inclined orbit.
  • RW Aur is a young binary system showing strong signatures of a recent tidal encounter between the circumprimary disk and the secondary star. The primary star has recently undergone two major dimming events ($\Delta$mag $\approx$ 2 in V-band), whose origin is still under debate. To shed light on the mechanism leading to the dimming events, we study the extinction properties, accretion variability, and gas kinematics using absorption lines from the material obscuring star RW Aur A. We compare our moderate resolution X-Shooter spectra of the dim state of RW Aur A with other spectral observations. In particular, we analyse archival high resolution UVES spectra obtained during the bright state of the system, in order to track the evolution of the spectral properties across the second dimming event. The spectrum obtained during the dim state shows narrow absorption lines in the Na and K optical doublets, where the former is saturated. With a velocity of -60 km/s these lines indicate that during the dim state the disk wind is either enhanced, or significantly displaced into the line of sight. The photometric evolution across the dimming event shows a gray extinction, and is correlated with a significant reduction of the EW of all photospheric lines. Emission lines tracing accretion do not vary significantly across the dimming. We conclude that the dimming event is related to a major perturbation on the inner disk. We suggest that the inner disk is occulting (most of) the star, and thus its photosphere, but is not occulting the accretion regions within a few stellar radii. Since observations of the outer disk indicate that the disk is modestly inclined (45 - 60 deg), we propose that the inner disk might be warped by a yet unseen (sub-)stellar companion, which may also explain the 2.77 day periodic variability of the spectral lines.
  • The binary system RW Aur consists of two classical T~Tauri stars (CTTSs). The primary recently underwent its second observed major dimming event ($\Delta V\,\sim2\,$mag). We present new, resolved Chandra X-ray and UKIRT near-IR (NIR) data as well as unresolved optical photometry obtained in the dim state to study the gas and dust content of the absorber causing the dimming. The X-ray data show that the absorbing column density increased from $N_H<0.1\times10^{22}\,$cm$^{-2}$ during the bright state to $\approx2\times10^{22}\,$cm$^{-2}$ in the dim state. The brightness ratio between dim and bright state at optical to NIR wavelengths shows only a moderate wavelength dependence and the NIR color-color diagram suggests no substantial reddening. Taken together, this indicates gray absorption by large grains ($\gtrsim1\,\mu$m) with a dust mass column density of $\gtrsim2\times10^{-4}\,$g$\,$cm$^{-2}$. Comparison with $N_H$ shows that an absorber responsible for the optical/NIR dimming and the X-ray absorption is compatible with the ISM's gas-to-dust ratio, i.e., that grains grow in the disk surface layers without largely altering the gas-to-dust ratio. Lastly, we discuss a scenario in which a common mechanism can explain the long-lasting dimming in RW Aur and recently in AA Tau.
  • A tidal disruption event (TDE) occurs when a star wanders close enough to a black hole to be disrupted by its tidal force. The debris of a tidally disrupted star are expected to form an accretion disc around the supermassive black hole. The light curves of these events sometimes show a quasi-periodic modulation of the flux that can be associated with the precession of the accretion disc due to the Lense-Thirring ("frame-dragging") effect. Since the initial star orbit is in general inclined with respect to the black hole spin, this misalignment combined with the Lense-Thirring effect leads to a warp in the disc. In this paper we provide a simple model of the system composed by a thick and narrow accretion disc surrounding a spinning supermassive black hole, with the aim to: (a) compute the expected precession period as a function of the system parameters, (b) discuss the conditions that have to be satisfied in order to have rigid precession, (c) investigate the alignment process, highlighting how different mechanisms play a role leading the disc and the black hole angular momenta into alignment.
  • We address the problem of learning an unknown unitary transformation from a finite number of examples. The problem consists in finding the learning machine that optimally emulates the examples, thus reproducing the unknown unitary maximum fidelity. Learning a unitary is equivalent to storing it in the state of a quantum memory (the memory of the learning machine), and subsequently retrieving it. We prove that, whenever the unknown unitary is drawn from a group, the optimal strategy consists in a parallel call of the available uses followed by a "measure-and-rotate" retrieving. Differing from the case of quantum cloning, where the incoherent "measure-and-prepare" strategies are typically suboptimal, in the case of learning the "measure-and-rotate" strategy is optimal even when the learning machine is asked to reproduce a single copy of the unknown unitary. We finally address the problem of the optimal inversion of an unknown unitary evolution, showing also in this case the optimality of the "measure-and-rotate" strategies and applying our result to the optimal approximate realignment of reference frames for quantum communication.
  • We present probability-fidelity tradeoffs for a varying quantum operation with fixed input-output states and for a varying inversion of a fixed quantum operation.
  • We present the first complete optimization of quantum tomography, for states, POVMs, and various classes of transformations, for arbitrary prior ensemble and arbitrary representation, giving corresponding feasible experimental schemes.