• This paper describes the observations and the first data release (DR1) of the ESO public spectroscopic survey "VANDELS, a deep VIMOS survey of the CANDELS CDFS and UDS fields". VANDELS' main targets are star-forming galaxies at 2.4<z<5.5 and massive passive galaxies at 1<z<2.5. By adopting a strategy of ultra-long exposure times, from 20 to 80 hours per source, VANDELS is designed to be the deepest ever spectroscopic survey of the high-redshift Universe. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the VIMOS spectrograph, the survey has obtained ultra-deep spectra covering the wavelength 4800-10000 A with sufficient signal-to-noise to investigate the astrophysics of high-redshift galaxy evolution via detailed absorption line studies. The VANDELS-DR1 is the release of all spectra obtained during the first season of observations and includes data for galaxies for which the total (or half of the total) scheduled integration time was completed. The release contains 879 individual objects with a measured redshift and includes fully wavelength and flux-calibrated 1D spectra, the associated error spectra, sky spectra and wavelength-calibrated 2D spectra. We also provide a catalog with the essential galaxy parameters, including spectroscopic redshifts and redshift quality flags. In this paper we present the survey layout and observations, the data reduction and redshift measurement procedure and the general properties of the VANDELS-DR1 sample. We also discuss the spectroscopic redshift distribution, the accuracy of the photometric redshifts and we provide some examples of data products. All VANDELS-DR1 data are publicly available and can be retrieved from the ESO archive. Two further data releases are foreseen in the next 2 years with a final release scheduled for June 2020 which will include improved re-reduction of the entire spectroscopic data set. (abridged)
  • JWST was conceived and built to answer one of the most fundamental questions that humans can address empirically: "How did the Universe make its first stars?". Our First Lights At REionization (FLARE) project transforms the quest for the epoch of reionization from the static to the time domain. It targets the complementary question: "What happened to those first stars?". It will be answered by observations of the most luminous events: supernovae and accretion on to black holes formed by direct collapse from the primordial gas clouds. These transients provide direct constraints on star-formation rates (SFRs) and the truly initial Initial Mass Function (IMF), and they may identify possible stellar seeds of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Furthermore, our knowledge of the physics of these events at ultra-low metallicity will be much expanded. JWST's unique capabilities will detect these most luminous and earliest cosmic messengers easily in fairly shallow observations. However, these events are very rare at the dawn of cosmic structure formation and so require large area coverage. Time domain astronomy can be advanced to an unprecedented depth by means of a shallow field of JWST reaching 27 mag AB in 2 and 4.4 microns over a field as large as 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year. Such a survey may set strong constraints or detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts beyond 10, pinpointing the redshift of the first stars, or at least their death. Based on our current knowledge of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), such a survey will find one or more SLSNe at redshifts above 6 in five years and possibly several direct collapse black holes. Although JWST is not designed as a wide field survey telescope, we show that such a wide field survey is possible with JWST and is critical in addressing several of its key scientific goals.
  • We present a multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the COSMOS field as part of the observations by the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The catalog is based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observations of the COSMOS field (centered at RA: $10^h00^m28^s$, Dec:$+02^{\circ}12^{\prime}21^{\prime\prime}$). The final catalog has 38671 sources with photometric data in forty two bands from UV to the infrared ($\rm \sim 0.3-8\,\mu m$). This includes broad-band photometry from the HST, CFHT, Subaru, VISTA and Spitzer Space Telescope in the visible, near infrared and infrared bands along with intermediate and narrow-band photometry from Subaru and medium band data from Mayall NEWFIRM. Source detection was conducted in the WFC3 F160W band (at $\rm 1.6\,\mu m$) and photometry is generated using the Template FITting algorithm. We further present a catalog of the physical properties of sources as identified in the HST F160W band and measured from the multi-band photometry by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions of sources against templates.
  • The Frontier Fields are a director's discretionary time campaign with HST and the Spitzer Space Telescope to see deeper into the universe than ever before. The Frontier Fields combine the power of HST and Spitzer with the natural gravitational telescopes of massive high-magnification clusters of galaxies to produce the deepest observations of clusters and their lensed galaxies ever obtained. Six clusters - Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403, MACSJ0717.5+3745, MACSJ1149.5+2223, Abell S1063, and Abell 370 - were selected based on their lensing strength, sky darkness, Galactic extinction, parallel field suitability, accessibility to ground-based facilities, HST, Spitzer and JWST observability, and pre-existing ancillary data. These clusters have been targeted by the HST ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR with coordinated parallels of adjacent blank fields for over 840 HST orbits. The Spitzer Space Telescope has dedicated > 1000 hours of director's discretionary time to obtain IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging to ~26.5, 26.0 ABmag 5-sigma point-source depths in the six cluster and six parallel Frontier Fields. The Frontier Field parallel fields are the second-deepest observations thus far by HST with ~29th ABmag 5-sigma point source depths in seven optical - near-infrared bandpasses. Galaxies behind the Frontier Field cluster lenses experience typical magnification factors of a few, with small regions near the critical curves magnified by factors 10-100. Therefore, the Frontier Field cluster HST images achieve intrinsic depths of ~30-33 magnitudes over very small volumes. Early studies of the Frontier Fields have probed galaxies fainter than any seen before during the epoch of reionization 6 < z < 10, mapped out the cluster dark matter to unprecedented resolution, and followed lensed transient events.
  • We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z < 3 (JH-red). The 350 arcmin^2 of the GOODS-N and GOODS-S fields with the deepest HST/WFC3 and IRAC data contain 285 HIEROs down to [4.5] < 24 mag. We focus here primarily on JH-blue (z > 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive (M_{*} > 10^{11.2} Msun) compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ~60% of all galaxies with M_{*} > 10^{10.5} Msun identified at z > 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations. While HIEROs make up 15-25% of the total SFR density at z ~ 4-5, they completely dominate the SFR density taking place in M_{*} >10^{10.5} Msun galaxies, and are therefore crucial to understanding the very early phase of massive galaxy formation.
  • We use data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey to study how the spatial variation in the stellar populations of galaxies relate to the formation of galaxies at $1.5 < z < 3.5$. We use the Internal Color Dispersion (ICD), measured between the rest-frame UV and optical bands, which is sensitive to age (and dust attenuation) variations in stellar populations. The ICD shows a relation with the stellar masses and morphologies of the galaxies. Galaxies with the largest variation in their stellar populations as evidenced by high ICD have disk-dominated morphologies (with S\'{e}rsic indexes $< 2$) and stellar masses between $10 < \mathrm{Log~M/ M_\odot}< 11$. There is a marked decrease in the ICD as the stellar mass and/or the S\'ersic index increases. By studying the relations between the ICD and other galaxy properties including sizes, total colors, star-formation rate, and dust attenuation, we conclude that the largest variations in stellar populations occur in galaxies where the light from newly, high star-forming clumps contrasts older stellar disk populations. This phase reaches a peak for galaxies only with a specific stellar mass range, $10 < \mathrm{Log~M/ M_\odot} < 11$, and prior to the formation of a substantial bulge/spheroid. In contrast, galaxies at higher or lower stellar masses, and/or higher S\'{e}rsic index ($n > 2$) show reduced ICD values, implying a greater homogeneity of their stellar populations. This indicates that if a galaxy is to have both a quiescent bulge along with a star forming disk, typical of Hubble Sequence galaxies, this is most common for stellar masses $10 < \mathrm{Log~M/M_\odot} < 11$ and when the bulge component remains relatively small ($n<2$).
  • In order to derive the AGN contribution to the cosmological ionizing emissivity we have selected faint AGN candidates at $z>4$ in the CANDELS GOODS-South field which is one of the deepest fields with extensive multiwavelength coverage from Chandra, HST, Spitzer and various groundbased telescopes. We have adopted a relatively novel criterion. As a first step high redshift galaxies are selected in the NIR $H$ band down to very faint levels ($H\leq27$) using reliable photometric redshifts. This corresponds at $z>4$ to a selection criterion based on the galaxy rest-frame UV flux. AGN candidates are then picked up from this parent sample if they show X-ray fluxes above a threshold of $F_X\sim 1.5\times 10^{-17}$ cgs (0.5-2 keV). We have found 22 AGN candidates at $z>4$ and we have derived the first estimate of the UV luminosity function in the redshift interval $4<z<6.5$ and absolute magnitude interval $-22.5\lesssim M_{1450} \lesssim -18.5$ typical of local Seyfert galaxies. The faint end of the derived luminosity function is about two/four magnitudes fainter at $z\sim 4-6$ than that derived from previous UV surveys. We have then estimated ionizing emissivities and hydrogen photoionization rates in the same redshift interval under reasonable assumptions and after discussion of possible caveats, the most important being the large uncertainties involved in the estimate of photometric redshift for sources with featureless, almost power-law SEDs and/or low average escape fraction of ionizing photons from the AGN host galaxies. We argue that, under reasonable evaluations of possible biases, the probed AGN population can produce at $z=4-6.5$ photoionization rates consistent with that required to keep highly ionized the intergalactic medium observed in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest of high redshift QSO spectra, providing an important contribution to the cosmic reionization.
  • We have targeted two recently discovered Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) to search for dust continuum and [CII] 158 micron line emission. The strongly lensed z~6.8 LBG A1703-zD1 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 1703, and the spectroscopically confirmed z=7.508 LBG z8-GND-5296 in the GOODS-N field have been observed with the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) at 1.2mm. These observations have been combined with those of three z>6.5 Lya emitters (named HCM6A, Himiko, and IOK-1), for which deep measurements were recently obtained with the PdBI and ALMA. [CII] is undetected in both galaxies, providing a deep upper limit for Abell1703-zD1, comparable to recent ALMA non-detections. Dust continuum emission from Abell1703-zD1 and z8-GND-5296 is not detected with an rms of 0.12 and 0.16 mJy/beam. From these non-detections we derive upper limits on their IR luminosity and star formation rate, dust mass, and UV attenuation. Thanks to strong gravitational lensing the limit for Abell1703-zD1 is probing the sub-LIRG regime ($L_{IR} <8.1 \times 10^{10}$ Lsun) and very low dust masses ($M_d<1.6 \times 10^7$ Msun). We find that all five galaxies are compatible with the Calzetti IRX-$\beta$ relation, their UV attenuation is compatible with several indirect estimates from other methods (the UV slope, extrapolation of the attenuation measured from the IR/UV ratio at lower redshift, and SED fits), and the dust-to-stellar mass ratio is not incompatible with that of galaxies from z=0 to 3. For their stellar mass the high-z galaxies studied here have an attenuation below the one expected from the mean relation of low redshift (z<1.5) galaxies. More and deeper (sub)-mm data are clearly needed to directly determine the UV attenuation and dust content of the dominant population of high-z star-forming galaxies and to establish more firmly their dependence on stellar mass, redshift, and other properties.
  • We study the far-infrared properties of 498 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, using 250, 350 and 500 micron data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) and 870 micron data from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). None of the 126, 280 or 92 LAEs at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, respectively, are individually detected in the far-infrared data. We use stacking to probe the average emission to deeper flux limits, reaching $1\sigma$ depths of ~0.1 to 0.4 mJy. The LAEs are also undetected at $\ge3\sigma$ in the stacks, although a $2.5\sigma$ signal is observed at 870 micron for the z=2.8 sources. We consider a wide range of far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), including a M82 and an Sd galaxy template, to determine upper limits on the far-infrared luminosities and far-infrared-derived star-formation rates of the LAEs. These star-formation rates are then combined with those inferred from the Ly$\alpha$ and UV emission to determine lower limits on the LAEs Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction ($f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$)). For the Sd SED template, the inferred LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) are $\gtrsim30%$ ($1\sigma$) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, which are all significantly higher than the global $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) at these redshifts. Thus, if the LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) follows the global evolution then they have warmer far-infrared SEDs than the Sd galaxy template. The average and M82 SEDs produce lower limits on the LAE $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) of ~10 to 20% ($1\sigma$), all of which are slightly higher than the global evolution of $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) but consistent with it at the 2 to 3$\sigma$ level.
  • We present the first set of maps and band-merged catalog from the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS). Observations at 250, 350, and 500 micron were taken with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. HerS covers 79 deg$^2$ along the SDSS Stripe 82 to a depth of 13.0, 12.9, and 14.8 mJy beam$^{-1}$ (including confusion) at 250, 350, and 500 micron, respectively. HerS was designed to measure correlations with external tracers of the dark matter density field --- either point-like (i.e., galaxies selected from radio to X-ray) or extended (i.e., clusters and gravitational lensing) --- in order to measure the bias and redshift distribution of intensities of infrared-emitting dusty star-forming galaxies and AGN. By locating HeRS in Stripe 82, we maximize the overlap with available and upcoming cosmological surveys. The band-merged catalog contains 3.3x10$^4$ sources detected at a significance of >3 $\sigma$ (including confusion noise). The maps and catalog are available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/hers/
  • We have a developed a new method for fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to identify and constrain the physical properties of high-redshift (4 < z < 8) galaxies. Our approach uses an implementation of Bayesian based Markov Chain Monte Carlo (PiMC^2) that allows us to compare observations to arbitrarily complex models and to compute 95% credible intervals that provide robust constraints for the model parameters. The work is presented in 2 sections. In the first, we test PiMC^2 using simulated SEDs to not only confirm the recovery of the known inputs but to assess the limitations of the method and identify potential hazards of SED fitting when applied specifically to high redshift (z>4) galaxies. Our tests reveal five critical results: 1) the ability to confidently constrain metallicity, population ages, and Av all require photometric accuracy better than what is currently achievable (i.e. less than a few percent); 2) the ability to confidently constrain stellar masses (within a factor of two) can be achieved without the need for high-precision photometry; 3) the addition of IRAC photometry does not guarantee that tighter constraints of the stellar masses and ages can be defined; 4) different assumptions about the star formation history can lead to significant biases in mass and age estimates; and 5) we are able to constrain stellar age and Av of objects that are both young and relatively dust free. In the second part of the paper we apply PiMC^2 to 17 4<z<8 objects, including the GRAPES Ly alpha sample (4<z<6), supplemented by HST/WFC3 near-IR observations, and several broad band selected z>6 galaxies. Using PiMC^2, we are able to constrain the stellar mass of these objects and in some cases their stellar age and find no evidence that any of these sources formed at a redshift much larger than z_f=8, a time when the Universe was ~ 0.6 Gyr old.