• In this research note, we present a set of distortion solutions that may be used to correct geometric optical distortion in images taken with the S13 camera of the NACO adaptive optics imager.
  • To investigate the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, we performed near-infrared interferometric observations of the classical TTauri binary system S CrA. We present the first VLTI-GRAVITY high spectral resolution ($R\sim$4000) observations of a classical TTauri binary, S CrA (composed of S CrA N and S CrA S and separated by $\sim$1.4"), combining the four 8-m telescopes in dual-field mode. Our observations in the near-infrared K-band continuum reveal a disk around each binary component, with similar half-flux radii of about 0.1 au at d$\sim$130 pc, inclinations ($i=$28$\pm$3$^o$\ and $i=$22$\pm$6$^o$), and position angles (PA=0$^o\pm$6$^o$ and PA=-2$^o\pm$12$^o$), suggesting that they formed from the fragmentation of a common disk. The S CrA N spectrum shows bright HeI and Br$\gamma$ line emission exhibiting inverse P-Cygni profiles, typically associated with infalling gas. The continuum-compensated Br$\gamma$ line visibilities of S CrA N show the presence of a compact Br$\gamma$ emitting region the radius of which is about $\sim$0.06 au, which is twice as big as the truncation radius. This component is mostly tracing a wind. Moreover, a slight radius change between the blue- and red-shifted Br$\gamma$ line components is marginally detected. The presence of an inverse P-Cygni profile in the HeI and Br$\gamma$ lines, along with the tentative detection of a slightly larger size of the blue-shifted Br$\gamma$ line component, hint at the simultaneous presence of a wind and magnetospheric accretion in S CrA N.
  • We study the young S-stars within a distance of 0.04 pc from the supermassive black hole in the center of our Galaxy. Given how inhospitable the region is for star formation, their presence is more puzzling the younger we estimate their ages. In this study, we analyse the result of 12 years of high resolution spectroscopy within the central arcsecond of the Galactic Center (GC). By co-adding between 55 and 105 hours of spectra we have obtained high signal to noise H- and K-band spectra of eight stars orbiting the central supermassive black hole. Using deep H-band spectra, we show that these stars must be high surface gravity (dwarf) stars. We compare these deep spectra to detailed model atmospheres and stellar evolution models to infer the stellar parameters. Our analysis reveals an effective temperature of 21000-28500 K, a rotational velocity of 60-170 km/s, and a surface gravity of 4.1-4.2. These parameters imply a spectral type of B0-B3V for these stars. The inferred masses lie within 8-14 Msun. We derive an age of 6.6^{+3.4}{-4.7} Myr for the star S2, which is compatible with the age of the clockwise rotating young stellar disk in the GC. We estimate the age of all other studied S-stars to be less than 15 Myr, which are compatible with the age of S2 within the uncertainties. The relatively low ages for these S-stars favor a scenario in which the stars formed in a local disk rather than the field-binary-disruption scenario throughout a longer period of time.
  • The nature of the gaseous and dusty cloud G2 in the Galactic Centre is still under debate. We present three-dimensional hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations of G2, modeled as an outflow from a "compact source" moving on the observed orbit. The construction of mock position-velocity (PV) diagrams enables a direct comparison with observations and allow us to conclude that the observational properties of the gaseous component of G2 could be matched by a massive ($\dot{M}_\mathrm{w}=5\times 10^{-7} \;M_{\odot} \mathrm{yr^{-1}}$) and slow ($50 \;\mathrm{km \;s^{-1}}$) outflow, as observed for T Tauri stars. In order for this to be true, only the material at larger ($>100 \;\mathrm{AU}$) distances from the source must be actually emitting, otherwise G2 would appear too compact compared to the observed PV diagrams. On the other hand, the presence of a central dusty source might be able to explain the compactness of G2's dust component. In the present scenario, 5-10 years after pericentre the compact source should decouple from the previously ejected material, due to the hydrodynamic interaction of the latter with the surrounding hot and dense atmosphere. In this case, a new outflow should form, ahead of the previous one, which would be the smoking gun evidence for an outflow scenario.
  • GRAVITY Collaboration: R. Abuter, M. Accardo, A. Amorim, N. Anugu, G. Ávila, N. Azouaoui, M. Benisty, J.P. Berger, N. Blind, H. Bonnet, P. Bourget, W. Brandner, R. Brast, A. Buron, L. Burtscher, F. Cassaing, F. Chapron, É. Choquet, Y. Clénet, C. Collin, V. Coudé du Foresto, W. de Wit, P.T. de Zeeuw, C. Deen, F. Delplancke-Ströbele, R. Dembet, F. Derie, J. Dexter, G. Duvert, M. Ebert, A. Eckart, F. Eisenhauer, M. Esselborn, P. Fédou, G. Finger, P. Garcia, C.E. Garcia Dabo, R. Garcia Lopez, E. Gendron, R. Genzel, S. Gillessen, F. Gonte, P. Gordo, M. Grould, U. Grözinger, S. Guieu, P. Haguenauer, O. Hans, X. Haubois, M. Haug, F. Haussmann, Th. Henning, S. Hippler, M. Horrobin, A. Huber, Z. Hubert, N. Hubin, C.A. Hummel, G. Jakob, A. Janssen, L. Jochum, L. Jocou, A. Kaufer, S. Kellner, L. Kern, P. Kervella, M. Kiekebusch, R. Klein, Y. Kok, J. Kolb, M. Kulas, S. Lacour, V. Lapeyrère, B. Lazareff, J.-B. Le Bouquin, P. Lèna, R. Lenzen, S. Lévêque, M. Lippa, Y. Magnard, L. Mehrgan, M. Mellein, A. Mérand, J. Moreno-Ventas, T. Moulin, E. Müller, F. Müller, U. Neumann, S. Oberti, T. Ott, L. Pallanca, J. Panduro, L. Pasquini, T. Paumard, I. Percheron, K. Perraut, G. Perrin, A. Pflüger, O. Pfuhl, T. Phan Duc, P.M. Plewa, D. Popovic, S. Rabien, A. Ramírez, J. Ramos, C. Rau, M. Riquelme, R.-R. Rohloff, G. Rousset, J. Sanchez-Bermudez, S. Scheithauer, M. Schöller, N. Schuhler, J. Spyromilio, C. Straubmeier, E. Sturm, M. Suarez, K.R.W. Tristram, N. Ventura, F. Vincent, I. Waisberg, I. Wank, J. Weber, E. Wieprecht, M. Wiest, E. Wiezorrek, M. Wittkowski, J. Woillez, B. Wolff, S. Yazici, D. Ziegler, G. Zins
    May 5, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    GRAVITY is a new instrument to coherently combine the light of the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope Interferometer to form a telescope with an equivalent 130 m diameter angular resolution and a collecting area of 200 m$^2$. The instrument comprises fiber fed integrated optics beam combination, high resolution spectroscopy, built-in beam analysis and control, near-infrared wavefront sensing, phase-tracking, dual beam operation and laser metrology [...]. This article gives an overview of GRAVITY and reports on the performance and the first astronomical observations during commissioning in 2015/16. We demonstrate phase tracking on stars as faint as m$_K$ ~ 10 mag, phase-referenced interferometry of objects fainter than m$_K$ ~ 15 mag with a limiting magnitude of m$_K$ ~ 17 mag, minute long coherent integrations, a visibility accuracy of better than 0.25 %, and spectro-differential phase and closure phase accuracy better than 0.5{\deg}, corresponding to a differential astrometric precision of better than 10 microarcseconds ({\mu}as). The dual-beam astrometry, measuring the phase difference of two objects with laser metrology, is still under commissioning. First observations show residuals as low as 50 {\mu}as when following objects over several months. We illustrate the instrument performance with the observations of archetypical objects for the different instrument modes. Examples include the Galactic Center supermassive black hole and its fast orbiting star S2 for phase referenced dual beam observations and infrared wavefront sensing, the High Mass X-Ray Binary BP Cru and the Active Galactic Nucleus of PDS 456 for few {\mu}as spectro-differential astrometry, the T Tauri star S CrA for a spectro-differential visibility analysis, {\xi} Tel and 24 Cap for high accuracy visibility observations, and {\eta} Car for interferometric imaging with GRAVITY.
  • We observe the HMXB BP Cru using interferometry in the near-infrared K band with VLTI/GRAVITY. Continuum visibilities are at most partially resolved, consistent with the predicted size of the hypergiant. Differential visibility amplitude ($\Delta |V| \sim 5\%$) and phase ($\Delta \phi \sim 2 \deg$) signatures are observed across the HeI $2.059 \mu$m and Br$\gamma$ lines, the latter seen strongly in emission, unusual for the donor star's spectral type. For a baseline $B \sim 100$m, the differential phase RMS $\sim 0.2 \deg$ corresponds to an astrometric precision of $\sim 2 \mu$as. A model-independent analysis in the marginally resolved limit of interferometry reveals asymmetric and extended emission with a strong wavelength dependence. We propose geometric models based on an extended and distorted wind and/or a high density gas stream, which has long been predicted to be present in this system. The observations show that optical interferometry is now able to resolve HMXBs at the spatial scale at which accretion takes place, and therefore probe the effects of the gravitational and radiation fields of the compact object on its environment.
  • We present the first optical observation at sub-milliarcsecond (mas) scale of the microquasar SS 433 obtained with the GRAVITY instrument on the VLT interferometer. The 3.5 hour exposure reveals a rich K-band spectrum dominated by hydrogen Br$\gamma\ $ and \ion{He}{i} lines, as well as (red-shifted) emission lines coming from the jets. The K-band continuum emitting region is dominated by a marginally resolved point source ($<$ 1 mas) embedded inside a diffuse background accounting for 10\% of the total flux. The jet line positions agree well with the ones expected from the jet kinematic model, an interpretation also supported by the consistent sign (i.e. negative/positive for the receding/approaching jet component) of the phase shifts observed in the lines. The significant visibility drop across the jet lines, together with the small and nearly identical phases for all baselines, point toward a jet that is offset by less than 0.5 mas from the continuum source and resolved in the direction of propagation, with a typical size of 2 mas. The jet position angle of $\sim$80$^{\circ}$ is consistent with the expected one at the observation date. Jet emission so close to the central binary system would suggest that line locking, if relevant to explain the amplitude and stability of the 0.26c jet velocity, operates on elements heavier than hydrogen. The Br$\gamma\ $ profile is broad and double peaked. It is better resolved than the continuum and the change of the phase signal sign across the line on all baselines suggests an East-West oriented geometry alike the jet direction and supporting a (polar) disk wind origin.
  • In early 2014 the fast-moving near-infrared source G2 reached its closest approach to the supermassive black hole Sgr A* in the Galactic Center. We report on the evolution of the ionized gaseous component and the dusty component of G2 immediately after this event, revealed by new observations obtained in 2015 and 2016 with the SINFONI integral field spectrograph and the NACO imager at the ESO VLT. The spatially resolved dynamics of the Br$\gamma$ line emission can be accounted for by the ballistic motion and tidal shearing of a test-particle cloud that has followed a highly eccentric Keplerian orbit around the black hole for the last 12 years. The non-detection of a drag force or any strong hydrodynamic interaction with the hot gas in the inner accretion zone limits the ambient density to less than a few 10$^3$ cm$^{-3}$ at the distance of closest approach (1500 $R_s$), assuming G2 is a spherical cloud moving through a stationary and homogeneous atmosphere. The dust continuum emission is unresolved in L'-band, but stays consistent with the location of the Br$\gamma$ emission. The total luminosity of the Br$\gamma$ and L' emission has remained constant to within the measurement uncertainty. The nature and origin of G2 are likely related to that of the precursor source G1, since their orbital evolution is similar, though not identical. Both object are also likely related to a trailing tail structure, which is continuously connected to G2 over a large range in position and radial velocity.
  • We present the first fully simultaneous fits to the NIR and X-ray spectral slope (and its evolution) during a very bright flare from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's center. Our study arises from ambitious multi-wavelength monitoring campaigns with XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and SINFONI. The average multi-wavelength spectrum is well reproduced by a broken power-law with $\Gamma_{NIR}=1.7\pm0.1$ and $\Gamma_X=2.27\pm0.12$. The difference in spectral slopes ($\Delta\Gamma=0.57\pm0.09$) strongly supports synchrotron emission with a cooling break. The flare starts first in the NIR with a flat and bright NIR spectrum, while X-ray radiation is detected only after about $10^3$ s, when a very steep X-ray spectrum ($\Delta\Gamma=1.8\pm0.4$) is observed. These measurements are consistent with synchrotron emission with a cooling break and they suggest that the high energy cut-off in the electron distribution ($\gamma_{max}$) induces an initial cut-off in the optical-UV band that evolves slowly into the X-ray band. The temporal and spectral evolution observed in all bright X-ray flares are also in line with a slow evolution of $\gamma_{max}$. We also observe hints for a variation of the cooling break that might be induced by an evolution of the magnetic field (from $B\sim30\pm8$ G to $B\sim4.8\pm1.7$ G at the X-ray peak). Such drop of the magnetic field at the flare peak would be expected if the acceleration mechanism is tapping energy from the magnetic field, such as in magnetic reconnection. We conclude that synchrotron emission with a cooling break is a viable process for Sgr A*'s flaring emission.
  • Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (GR) successfully describes gravity. The most fundamental predictions of GR are black holes (BHs), but in spite of many convincing BH candidates in the Universe, there is no conclusive experimental proof of their existence using astronomical observations in the electromagnetic spectrum. Are BHs real astrophysical objects? Does GR hold in its most extreme limit or are alternatives needed? The prime target to address these fundamental questions is in the center of our own Galaxy, which hosts the closest and best-constrained supermassive BH candidate in the Universe, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Three different types of experiments hold the promise to test GR in a strong-field regime using observations of Sgr A* with new-generation instruments. The first experiment aims to image the relativistic plasma emission which surrounds the event horizon and forms a "shadow" cast against the background, whose predicted size (~50 microarcseconds) can now be resolved by upcoming VLBI experiments at mm-waves such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). The second experiment aims to monitor stars orbiting Sgr A* with the upcoming near-infrared interferometer GRAVITY at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The third experiment aims to time a radio pulsar in tight orbit about Sgr A* using radio telescopes (including the Atacama Large Millimeter Array or ALMA). The BlackHoleCam project exploits the synergy between these three different techniques and aims to measure the main BH parameters with sufficient precision to provide fundamental tests of GR and probe the spacetime around a BH in any metric theory of gravity. Here, we review our current knowledge of the physical properties of Sgr A* as well as the current status of such experimental efforts towards imaging the event horizon, measuring stellar orbits, and timing pulsars around Sgr A*.
  • With the help of 3D AMR hydrodynamical simulations we aim at understanding G2's nature, recent evolution and fate in the coming years. By exploring the possible parameter space of the diffuse cloud scenario, we find that a starting point within the disc of young stars is favoured by the observations, which may hint at G2 being the result of stellar wind interactions.
  • We study the evolution of G2 in a \textit{Compact Source Scenario}, where G2 is the outflow from a low-mass central star moving on the observed orbit. This is done through 3D AMR simulations of the hydrodynamic interaction of G2 with the surrounding hot accretion flow. A comparison with observations is done by means of mock position-velocity (PV) diagrams. We found that a massive ($\dot{M}_\mathrm{w}=5\times 10^{-7} \;M_{\odot} \; \mathrm{yr^{-1}}$) and slow ($v_\mathrm{w}=50 \;\mathrm{km\; s^{-1}}$) outflow can reproduce G2's properties. A faster outflow ($v_\mathrm{w}=400 \;\mathrm{km\; s^{-1}}$) might also be able to explain the material that seems to follow G2 on the same orbit.
  • Observations of the gas component of the cloud G2 in the Galactic Center have revealed its connection to a tail (G2t) lying on the same orbit. More recent studies indicate a connection between G2 and G1, another cloud detected on the blueshifted side of G2's orbit, suggesting a scenario in which G2 is a denser clump in a stream of gas. In this Letter we show that a simulation of an outflow by a central source (possibly a T Tauri star) moving on G2's orbit and interacting with a hot atmosphere surrounding SgrA* can have G2 and G2t as a byproduct. G2 would be the bow-shock formed in the head of the source, while G2t might be the result of the stripping of the rest of the shocked material by the ram pressure of the surrounding hot gas and of its successive accumulation in the trailing region. Mock position-velocity diagrams for the Br$\gamma$ emission for this simulation can indeed reproduce the correct position and velocity of G2t, as well as the more tenuous material in between. Though some tension between the observations and the simulated model remains, we argue that this might be due to issues in the construction of observed position-velocity (PV) diagrams and/or to a poor treatment of some physical processes - like hydrodynamic mixing - in our simulation.
  • The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Centre super-massive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by $\sim 30$ Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. We explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of stellar winds via the non-linear thin shell instability. Following an analytical approach, we study the thermal evolution of slabs formed in the symmetric collision of winds, evaluating whether instabilities occur, and estimating possible clump masses. We find that the collision of relatively slow ($< 750$ km s$^{-1}$) and strong ($\sim 10^{-5}$ Msun yr$^{-1}$) stellar winds from stars at short separations ($<10$ mpc) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their known orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, making this process a possible but unlikely origin for G2. We also discuss clump formation in close binaries such as IRS 16SW and in asymmetric encounters as promising alternatives that deserve further numerical study.
  • Near-infrared observations of stellar orbits at the Galactic Center provide conclusive evidence for a massive black hole associated with the compact radio source Sgr A*. The astrometric reference frame for these observations is tied to a set of red giant stars, which are also detectable at radio wavelengths through SiO maser emission in their envelopes. We have improved the precision and long-term stability of this reference frame, in which Sgr A* is localized to within a factor 5 better than previously: ~0.17 mas in position (in 2009) and ~0.07 mas/yr in velocity. This improvement is the result of modeling and correcting optical distortion in the VLT/NACO imager to a sub-mas level and including new infrared and radio measurements, which now both span more than a decade in time. A further improvement will follow future observations and facilitate the detection of relativistic orbital effects.
  • The dusty, ionized gas cloud G2 is currently passing the massive black hole in the Galactic Center at a distance of roughly 2400 Schwarzschild radii. We explore the possibility of a starting point of the cloud within the disks of young stars. We make use of the large amount of new observations in order to put constraints on G2's origin. Interpreting the observations as a diffuse cloud of gas, we employ three-dimensional hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations with the PLUTO code and do a detailed comparison with observational data. The simulations presented in this work update our previously obtained results in multiple ways: (1) high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical AMR simulations are used, (2) the cloud follows the updated orbit based on the Brackett-$\gamma$ data, (3) a detailed comparison to the observed high-quality position-velocity diagrams and the evolution of the total Brackett-$\gamma$ luminosity is done. We concentrate on two unsolved problems of the diffuse cloud scenario: the unphysical formation epoch only shortly before the first detection and the too steep Brackett-$\gamma$ light curve obtained in simulations, whereas the observations indicate a constant Brackett-$\gamma$ luminosity between 2004 and 2013. For a given atmosphere and cloud mass, we find a consistent model that can explain both, the observed Brackett-$\gamma$ light curve and the position-velocity diagrams of all epochs. Assuming initial pressure equilibrium with the atmosphere, this can be reached for a starting date earlier than roughly 1900, which is close to apo-center and well within the disks of young stars.
  • We present a study of the X-ray flaring activity of Sgr A* during all the 150 XMM-Newton and Chandra observations pointed at the Milky Way center over the last 15 years. This includes the latest XMM-Newton and Chandra campaigns devoted to monitoring the closest approach of the very red Br-Gamma emitting object called G2. The entire dataset analysed extends from September 1999 through November 2014. We employed a Bayesian block analysis to investigate any possible variations in the characteristics (frequency, energetics, peak intensity, duration) of the flaring events that Sgr A* has exhibited since their discovery in 2001. We observe that the total bright-or-very bright flare luminosity of Sgr A* increased between 2013-2014 by a factor of 2-3 (~3.5 sigma significance). We also observe an increase (~99.9% significance) from 0.27+-0.04 to 2.5+-1.0 day^-1 of the bright-or-very bright flaring rate of Sgr A*, starting in late summer 2014, which happens to be about six months after G2's peri-center passage. This might indicate that clustering is a general property of bright flares and that it is associated with a stationary noise process producing flares not uniformly distributed in time (similar to what is observed in other quiescent black holes). If so, the variation in flaring properties would be revealed only now because of the increased monitoring frequency. Alternatively, this may be the first sign of an excess accretion activity induced by the close passage of G2. More observations are necessary to distinguish between these two hypotheses.
  • GRAVITY is the second generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer instrument for precision narrow-angle astrometry and interferometric imaging in the Near Infra-Red (NIR). It shall provide precision astrometry of order 10 microarcseconds, and imaging capability at a few milliarcsecond resolution, and hence will revolutionise dynamical measurements of celestial objects. GRAVITY is currently in the last stages of its integration and tests in Garching at MPE, and will be delivered to the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) in 2015. We present here the instrument, with a particular focus on the components making use of fibres: integrated optics beam combiners, polarisation rotators, fibre differential delay lines, and the metrology.
  • The VLTI instrument GRAVITY will provide very powerful astrometry by combining the light from four telescopes for two objects simultaneously. It will measure the angular separation between the two astronomical objects to a precision of 10 microarcseconds. This corresponds to a differential optical path difference (dOPD) between the targets of few nanometers and the paths within the interferometer have to be maintained stable to that level. For this purpose, the novel metrology system of GRAVITY will monitor the internal dOPDs by means of phase-shifting interferometry. We present the four-step phase-shifting concept of the metrology with emphasis on the method used for calibrating the phase shifts. The latter is based on a phase-step insensitive algorithm which unambiguously extracts phases in contrast to other methods that are strongly limited by non-linearities of the phase-shifting device. The main constraint of this algorithm is to introduce a robust ellipse fitting routine. Via this approach we are able to measure phase shifts in the laboratory with a typical accuracy of lambda/2000 or 1 nanometer of the metrology wavelength.
  • We present the installed and fully operational beam stabilization and fiber injection subsystem feeding the 2nd generation VLTI instrument GRAVITY. The interferometer GRAVITY requires an unprecedented stability of the VLTI optical train to achieve micro-arcsecond astrometry. For this purpose, GRAVITY contains four fiber coupler units, one per telescope. Each unit is equipped with actuators to stabilize the telescope beam in terms of tilt and lateral pupil displacement, to rotate the field, to adjust the polarization and to compensate atmospheric piston. A special roof-prism offers the possibility of on-axis as well as off-axis fringe tracking without changing the optical train. We describe the assembly, integration and alignment and the resulting optical quality and performance of the individual units. Finally, we present the closed-loop performance of the tip-tilt and pupil tracking achieved with the final systems in the lab.
  • We present in this paper the design and characterisation of a new sub-system of the VLTI 2nd generation instrument GRAVITY: the Calibration Unit. The Calibration Unit provides all functions to test and calibrate the beam combiner instrument: it creates two artificial stars on four beams, and dispose of four delay lines with an internal metrology. It also includes artificial stars for the tip-tilt and pupil guiding systems, as well as four metrology pick-up diodes, for tests and calibration of the corresponding sub-systems. The calibration unit also hosts the reference targets to align GRAVITY to the VLTI, and the safety shutters to avoid the metrology light to propagate in the VLTI-lab. We present the results of the characterisation and validtion of these differrent sub-units.
  • GRAVITY is the second generation VLT Interferometer (VLTI) instrument for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging. The laser metrology system of GRAVITY is at the heart of its astrometric mode, which must measure the distance of 2 stars with a precision of 10 micro-arcseconds. This means the metrology has to measure the optical path difference between the two beam combiners of GRAVITY to a level of 5 nm. The metrology design presents some non-common paths that have consequently to be stable at a level of 1 nm. Otherwise they would impact the performance of GRAVITY. The various tests we made in the past on the prototype give us hints on the components responsible for this error, and on their respective contribution to the total error. It is however difficult to assess their exact origin from only OPD measurements, and therefore, to propose a solution to this problem. In this paper, we present the results of a semi-empirical modeling of the fibered metrology system, relying on theoretical basis, as well as on characterisations of key components. The modeling of the metrology system regarding various effects, e.g., temperature, waveguide heating or mechanical stress, will help us to understand how the metrology behave. The goals of this modeling are to 1) model the test set-ups and reproduce the measurements (as a validation of the modeling), 2) determine the origin of the non-common path errors, and 3) propose modifications to the current metrology design to reach the required 1nm stability.
  • GRAVITY is a new generation beam combination instrument for the VLTI. Its goal is to achieve microarsecond astrometric accuracy between objects separated by a few arcsec. This $10^6$ accuracy on astrometric measurements is the most important challenge of the instrument, and careful error budget have been paramount during the technical design of the instrument. In this poster, we will focus on baselines induced errors, which is part of a larger error budget.
  • The stellar population in the central parsec of the Galaxy is dominated by an old (several Gyr) population, but young, massive stars dominate the luminosity function. We have studied the most luminous of these stars, GCIRS 7, in order to constrain the age of the recent star formation event in the Galactic Centre and to characterise it as an interferometric reference for observations of the Galactic Centre with the instrument GRAVITY, which will equip the Very Large Telescope Interferometer in the near future. We present the first H-band interferometric observations of GCIRS 7, obtained using the PIONIER visitor instrument on the VLTI using the four 8.2-m unit telescopes. In addition, we present unpublished K-band VLTI/AMBER data, build JHKL light-curves based on data spanning 4 decades, and measured the star's effective temperature using SINFONI spectroscopy. GCIRS 7 is marginally resolved at H-band (in 2013: uniform-disk diameter=1.076+/-0.093mas, R=960+/-92Rsun at 8.33+/-0.35kpc). We detect a significant circumstellar contribution at K-band. The star and its environment are variable in brightness and in size. The photospheric H-band variations are well modelled with two periods: P0~470+/-10 days (amplitude ~0.64mag) and long secondary period LSP~2700-2850 days (~1.1mag). As measured from CO equivalent width, <Teff>=3600+/-195K. The size, periods, luminosity (<Mbol>=-8.44+/-0.22) and effective temperature are consistent with an M1 supergiant with an initial mass of 22.5+/-2.5Msun and an age of 6.5-10Myr (depending on rotation). This age is in remarkable agreement with most estimates for the recent star formation event in the central parsec. Caution should be taken when using this star as an interferometric reference as it is variable in size, is surrounded by a variable circumstellar environment and large convection cells may form on its photosphere.
  • A basic principle of long baseline interferometry is that an optical path difference (OPD) directly translates into an astrometric measurement. In the simplest case, the OPD is equal to the scalar product between the vector linking the two telescopes and the normalized vector pointing toward the star. However, a too simple interpretation of this scalar product leads to seemingly conflicting results, called here "the baseline paradox". For micro-arcsecond accuracy astrometry, we have to model in full the metrology measurement. It involves a complex system subject to many optical effects: from pure baseline errors to static, quasi-static and high order optical aberrations. The goal of this paper is to present the strategy used by the "General Relativity Analysis via VLT InTerferometrY" instrument (GRAVITY) to minimize the biases introduced by these defects. It is possible to give an analytical formula on how the baselines and tip-tilt errors affect the astrometric measurement. This formula depends on the limit-points of three type of baselines: the wide-angle baseline, the narrow-angle baseline, and the imaging baseline. We also, numerically, include non-common path higher-order aberrations, whose amplitude were measured during technical time at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. We end by simulating the influence of high-order common-path aberrations due to atmospheric residuals calculated from a Monte-Carlo simulation tool for Adaptive optics systems. The result of this work is an error budget of the biases caused by the multiple optical imperfections, including optical dispersion. We show that the beam stabilization through both focal and pupil tracking is crucial to the GRAVITY system. Assuming the instrument pupil is stabilized at a 4 cm level on M1, and a field tracking below 0.2$\lambda/D$, we show that GRAVITY will be able to reach its objective of 10$\mu$as accuracy.