• We derive cosmological constraints from the probability distribution function (PDF) of evolved large-scale matter density fluctuations. We do this by splitting lines of sight by density based on their count of tracer galaxies, and by measuring both gravitational shear around and counts-in-cells in overdense and underdense lines of sight, in Dark Energy Survey (DES) First Year and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. Our analysis uses a perturbation theory model (see companion paper Friedrich at al.) and is validated using N-body simulation realizations and log-normal mocks. It allows us to constrain cosmology, bias and stochasticity of galaxies w.r.t. matter density and, in addition, the skewness of the matter density field. From a Bayesian model comparison, we find that the data weakly prefer a connection of galaxies and matter that is stochastic beyond Poisson fluctuations on <=20 arcmin angular smoothing scale. The two stochasticity models we fit yield DES constraints on the matter density $\Omega_m=0.26^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ and $\Omega_m=0.28^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ that are consistent with each other. These values also agree with the DES analysis of galaxy and shear two-point functions (3x2pt) that only uses second moments of the PDF. Constraints on $\sigma_8$ are model dependent ($\sigma_8=0.97^{+0.07}_{-0.06}$ and $0.80^{+0.06}_{-0.07}$ for the two stochasticity models), but consistent with each other and with the 3x2pt results if stochasticity is at the low end of the posterior range. As an additional test of gravity, counts and lensing in cells allow to compare the skewness $S_3$ of the matter density PDF to its LCDM prediction. We find no evidence of excess skewness in any model or data set, with better than 25 per cent relative precision in the skewness estimate from DES alone.
  • We present density split statistics, a framework that studies lensing and counts-in-cells as a function of foreground galaxy density, thereby providing a large-scale measurement of both 2-point and 3-point statistics. Our method extends our earlier work on trough lensing and is summarized as follows: given a foreground (low redshift) population of galaxies, we divide the sky into subareas of equal size but distinct galaxy density. We then measure lensing around uniformly spaced points separately in each of these subareas, as well as counts-in-cells statistics (CiC). The lensing signals trace the matter density contrast around regions of fixed galaxy density. Through the CiC measurements this can be related to the density profile around regions of fixed matter density. Together, these measurements constitute a powerful probe of cosmology, the skewness of the density field and the connection of galaxies and matter. In this paper we show how to model both the density split lensing signal and CiC from basic ingredients: a non-linear power spectrum, clustering hierarchy coefficients from perturbation theory and a parametric model for galaxy bias and shot-noise. Using N-body simulations, we demonstrate that this model is sufficiently accurate for a cosmological analysis on year 1 data from the Dark Energy Survey.
  • We present a weak gravitational lensing measurement of the external convergence along the line of sight to the quadruply lensed quasar HE$\,$0435$-$1223. Using deep r-band images from Subaru-Suprime-Cam we observe galaxies down to a 3$\sigma$ limiting magnitude of $\sim 26$ mags resulting in a source galaxy density of 14 galaxies / arcmin$^2$ after redshift-based cuts. Using an inpainting technique and Multi-Scale Entropy filtering algorithm, we find that the region in close proximity to the lens has an estimated external convergence of $\kappa=-0.012^{+0.020}_{-0.013}$ and is hence marginally under-dense. We also rule out the presence of any halo with a mass greater than $M_{\rm vir}=1.6\times10^{14}h^{-1}M_\odot$ (68$\%$ confidence limit). Our results, consistent with previous studies of this lens, confirm that the intervening mass along the line of sight to HE$\,$0435$-$1223 does not affect significantly the cosmological results inferred from the time delay measurements of that specific object.
  • We present a new measurement of the Hubble Constant H0 and other cosmological parameters based on the joint analysis of three multiply-imaged quasar systems with measured gravitational time delays. First, we measure the time delay of HE0435-1223 from 13-year light curves obtained as part of the COSMOGRAIL project. Companion papers detail the modeling of the main deflectors and line of sight effects, and how these data are combined to determine the time-delay distance of HE 0435-1223. Crucially, the measurements are carried out blindly with respect to cosmological parameters in order to avoid confirmation bias. We then combine the time-delay distance of HE0435-1223 with previous measurements from systems B1608+656 and RXJ1131-1231 to create a Time Delay Strong Lensing probe (TDSL). In flat $\Lambda$CDM with free matter and energy density, we find $H_0$ = 71.9 +2.4 -3.0 km/s/Mpc and $\Omega_{\Lambda}$ = 0.62 +0.24 -0.35 . This measurement is completely independent of, and in agreement with, the local distance ladder measurements of H0. We explore more general cosmological models combining TDSL with other probes, illustrating its power to break degeneracies inherent to other methods. The TDSL and Planck joint constraints are $H_0$ = 69.2 +1.4 -2.2 km/s/Mpc, $\Omega_{\Lambda}$ = 0.70 +0.01 -0.01 and $\Omega_k$ = 0.003 +0.004 -0.006 in open $\Lambda$CDM and $H_0$ = 79.0 +4.4 -4.2 km/s/Mpc, $\Omega_{de}$ = 0.77 +0.02 -0.03 and $w$ = -1.38 +0.14 -0.16 in flat $w$CDM. Combined with Planck and Baryon Acoustic Oscillation data, when relaxing the constraints on the numbers of relativistic species we find $N_{eff}$ = 3.34 +0.21 -0.21 and when relaxing the total mass of neutrinos we find 0.182 eV. In an open $w$CDM in combination with Planck and CMB lensing we find $H_0$ = 77.9 +5.0 -4.2 km/s/Mpc, $\Omega_{de}$ = 0.77 +0.03 -0.03, $\Omega_k$ = -0.003 +0.004 -0.004 and $w$ = -1.37 +0.18 -0.23.
  • Galaxies located in the environment or on the line of sight towards gravitational lenses can significantly affect lensing observables, and can lead to systematic errors on the measurement of $H_0$ from the time-delay technique. We present the results of a systematic spectroscopic identification of the galaxies in the field of view of the lensed quasar HE0435-1223, using the W. M. Keck, Gemini and ESO-Very Large telescopes. Our new catalog triples the number of known galaxy redshifts in the vicinity of the lens, expanding to 102 the number of measured redshifts for galaxies separated by less than 3 arcmin from the lens. We complement our catalog with literature data to gather redshifts up to 15 arcmin from the lens, and search for galaxy groups or clusters projected towards HE0435-1223. We confirm that the lens is a member of a small group that includes at least 12 galaxies, and find 8 other group candidates near the line of sight of the lens. The flexion shift, namely the shift of lensed images produced by high order perturbation of the lens potential, is calculated for each galaxy/group and used to identify which objects produce the largest perturbation of the lens potential. This analysis demonstrates that i) at most three of the five brightest galaxies projected within 12 arcsec of the lens need to be explicitly used in the lens models, and ii) the groups can be treated in the lens model as an external tidal field (shear) contribution.
  • Strong gravitational lens systems with time delays between the multiple images allow measurements of time-delay distances, which are primarily sensitive to the Hubble constant that is key to probing dark energy, neutrino physics, and the spatial curvature of the Universe, as well as discovering new physics. We present H0LiCOW ($H_0$ Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring), a program that aims to measure $H_0$ with $<3.5\%$ uncertainty from five lens systems (B1608+656, RXJ1131-1231, HE0435-1223, WFI2033-4723 and HE1104-1805). We have been acquiring (1) time delays through COSMOGRAIL and Very Large Array monitoring, (2) high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging for the lens mass modeling, (3) wide-field imaging and spectroscopy to characterize the lens environment, and (4) moderate-resolution spectroscopy to obtain the stellar velocity dispersion of the lenses for mass modeling. In cosmological models with one-parameter extension to flat $\Lambda$CDM, we expect to measure $H_0$ to $<3.5\%$ in most models, spatial curvature $\Omega_{\rm k}$ to 0.004, $w$ to 0.14, and the effective number of neutrino species to 0.2 (1$\sigma$ uncertainties) when combined with current CMB experiments. These are, respectively, a factor of $\sim15$, $\sim2$, and $\sim1.5$ tighter than CMB alone. Our data set will further enable us to study the stellar initial mass function of the lens galaxies, and the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. This program will provide a foundation for extracting cosmological distances from the hundreds of time-delay lenses that are expected to be discovered in current and future surveys.
  • We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the mass-concentration relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.
  • This is the fourth in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Here, we use measurements of weak gravitational lensing from the Weighing the Giants project to calibrate Chandra X-ray measurements of total mass that rely on the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. This comparison of X-ray and lensing masses provides a measurement of the combined bias of X-ray hydrostatic masses due to both astrophysical and instrumental sources. Assuming a fixed cosmology, and within a characteristic radius (r_2500) determined from the X-ray data, we measure a lensing to X-ray mass ratio of 0.96 +/- 9% (stat) +/- 9% (sys). We find no significant trends of this ratio with mass, redshift or the morphological indicators used to select the sample. In accordance with predictions from hydro simulations for the most massive, relaxed clusters, our results disfavor strong, tens-of-percent departures from hydrostatic equilibrium at these radii. In addition, we find a mean concentration of the sample measured from lensing data of c_200 = $3.0_{-1.8}^{+4.4}$. Anticipated short-term improvements in lensing systematics, and a modest expansion of the relaxed lensing sample, can easily increase the measurement precision by 30--50%, leading to similar improvements in cosmological constraints that employ X-ray hydrostatic mass estimates, such as on Omega_m from the cluster gas mass fraction.
  • Under the assumption of a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, recent data from the Planck satellite point toward a Hubble constant that is in tension with that measured by gravitational lens time delays and by the local distance ladder. Prosaically, this difference could arise from unknown systematic uncertainties in some of the measurements. More interestingly -- if systematics were ruled out -- resolving the tension would require a departure from the flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, introducing for example a modest amount of spatial curvature, or a non-trivial dark energy equation of state. To begin to address these issues, we present here an analysis of the gravitational lens RXJ1131-1231 that is improved in one particular regard: we examine the issue of systematic error introduced by an assumed lens model density profile. We use more flexible gravitational lens models with baryonic and dark matter components, and find that the exquisite Hubble Space Telescope image with thousands of intensity pixels in the Einstein ring and the stellar velocity dispersion of the lens contain sufficient information to constrain these more flexible models. The total uncertainty on the time-delay distance is 6.6% for a single system. We proceed to combine our improved time-delay distance measurements with the WMAP9 and Planck posteriors. In an open Lambda-CDM model, the data for RXJ1131-1231 in combination with Planck favor a flat universe with Omega_k = 0.00+0.01/-0.02 (68% CI). In a flat wCDM model, the combination of RXJ1131-1231 and Planck yields w = -1.52+0.19/-0.20 (68% CI).
  • Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delays between the multiple images and models of the lens mass distribution allow a one-step determination of the time-delay distance, and thus a measure of cosmological parameters. We present a blind analysis of the gravitational lens RXJ1131-1231 incorporating (1) the newly measured time delays from COSMOGRAIL, (2) archival HST imaging of the lens system, (3) a new velocity-dispersion measurement of the lens galaxy of 323+/-20km/s based on Keck spectroscopy, and (4) a characterization of the line-of-sight structures via observations of the lens' environment and ray tracing through the Millennium Simulation. Our blind analysis is designed to prevent experimenter bias. The joint analysis of the data sets allows a time-delay distance measurement to 6% precision that takes into account all known systematic uncertainties. In combination with the WMAP7 data set in flat wCDM cosmology, our unblinded cosmological constraints for RXJ1131-1231 are: H_0=80.0+5.8/-5.7km/s/Mpc, OmegaDE=0.79+/-0.03 and w=-1.25+0.17/-0.21. We find the results to be statistically consistent with those from the analysis of the gravitational lens B1608+656. The joint constraints from the two lenses and WMAP7 are H_0=75.2+4.4/-4.2km/s/Mpc, OmegaDE=0.76+0.02/-0.03 and w=-1.14+0.17/-0.20 in flat wCDM, and H_0=73.1+2.4/-3.6km/s/Mpc, OmegaL=0.75+0.01/-0.02 and OmegaK=0.003+0.005/-0.006 in open LCDM. Time-delay lenses constrain especially tightly the Hubble constant (5.7% and 4.0% respectively in wCDM and open LCDM) and curvature of the universe. They complement well other cosmological probes, and provide an independent check of unknown systematics. Our measurement of the Hubble constant is completely independent of those based on the local distance ladder method, providing an important consistency check of the standard cosmological model and of general relativity.
  • We report the outcome of a 3-day workshop on the Hubble constant (H_0) that took place during February 6-8 2012 at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, on the campus of Stanford University. The participants met to address the following questions. Are there compelling scientific reasons to obtain more precise and more accurate measurements of H_0 than currently available? If there are, how can we achieve this goal? The answers that emerged from the workshop are (1) better measurements of H_0 provide critical independent constraints on dark energy, spatial curvature of the Universe, neutrino physics, and validity of general relativity, (2) a measurement of H_0 to 1% in both precision and accuracy, supported by rigorous error budgets, is within reach for several methods, and (3) multiple paths to independent determinations of H_0 are needed in order to access and control systematics.
  • Centroid positions of peaks identified in weak lensing mass maps often show offsets with respect to other means of identifying halo centres, like position of the brightest cluster galaxy or X-ray emission centroid. Here we study the effect of projected large-scale structure (LSS), smoothing of mass maps, and shape noise on the weak lensing peak positions. Additionally we compare the offsets in mass maps to those found in parametric model fits. Using ray-tracing simulations through the Millennium Run $N$-body simulation, we find that projected LSS does not alter the weak-lensing peak position within the limits of our simulations' spatial resolution, which exceeds the typical resolution of weak lensing maps. We conclude that projected LSS, although a major contaminant for weak-lensing mass estimates, is not a source of confusion for identifying halo centres. The typically reported offsets in the literature are caused by a combination of shape noise and smoothing alone. This is true for centroid positions derived both from mass maps and model fits.
  • Context: Understanding the evolution of the dark matter halos of galaxies after they become part of a cluster is essential for understanding the evolution of these satellite galaxies. Aims: We investigate the potential of galaxy-galaxy lensing to map the halo density profiles of galaxies in clusters. Methods: We propose a method that separates the weak-lensing signal of the dark-matter halos of galaxies in clusters from the weak-lensing signal of the cluster's main halo. Using toy cluster models as well as ray-tracing through N-body simulations of structure formation along with semi-analytic galaxy formation models, we test the method and assess its performance. Results: We show that with the proposed method, one can recover the density profiles of the cluster galaxy halos in the range 30 - 300 kpc. Using the method, we find that weak-lensing signal of cluster member galaxies in the Millennium Simulation is well described by an Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. In contrast, non-singular isothermal mass distribution (like PIEMD) model provide a poor fit. Furthermore, we do not find evidence for a sharp truncation of the galaxy halos in the range probed by our method. Instead, there is an observed overall decrease of the halo mass profile of cluster member galaxies with increasing time spent in the cluster. This trend, as well as the presence or absence of a truncation radius, should be detectable in future weak-lensing surveys like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) or the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey. Such surveys should also allow one to infer the mass-luminosity relation of cluster galaxies with our method over two decades in mass. Conclusions: It is possible to recover in a non-parametric way the mass profile of satellite galaxies and their dark matter halos in future surveys, using our proposed weak lensing method.
  • Strong gravitational lens systems with measured time delays between the multiple images provide a method for measuring the "time-delay distance" to the lens, and thus the Hubble constant. We present a Bayesian analysis of the strong gravitational lens system B1608+656, incorporating (i) new, deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations, (ii) a new velocity dispersion measurement of 260+/-15 km/s for the primary lens galaxy, and (iii) an updated study of the lens' environment. When modeling the stellar dynamics of the primary lens galaxy, the lensing effect, and the environment of the lens, we explicitly include the total mass distribution profile logarithmic slope gamma' and the external convergence kappa_ext; we marginalize over these parameters, assigning well-motivated priors for them, and so turn the major systematic errors into statistical ones. The HST images provide one such prior, constraining the lens mass density profile logarithmic slope to be gamma'=2.08+/-0.03; a combination of numerical simulations and photometric observations of the B1608+656 field provides an estimate of the prior for kappa_ext: 0.10 +0.08/-0.05. This latter distribution dominates the final uncertainty on H_0. Compared with previous work on this system, the new data provide an increase in precision of more than a factor of two. In combination with the WMAP 5-year data set, we find that the B1608+656 data set constrains the curvature parameter to be -0.031 < Omega_k < 0.009 (95% CL), a level of precision comparable to that afforded by the current Type Ia SNe sample. Asserting a flat spatial geometry, we find that, in combination with WMAP, H_0 = 69.7 +4.9/-5.0 km/s/Mpc and w=-0.94 +0.17/-0.19 (68% CL), suggesting that the observations of B1608+656 constrain w as tightly as do the current Baryon Acoustic Oscillation data. (abridged)
  • (abridged) We study the accuracy of various approximations to cosmic shear and weak galaxy-galaxy lensing and investigate effects of Born corrections and lens-lens coupling. We use ray-tracing through the Millennium Simulation to calculate various cosmic-shear and galaxy-galaxy-lensing statistics. We compare the results from ray-tracing to semi-analytic predictions. We find: (i) The linear approximation provides an excellent fit to cosmic-shear power spectra as long as the actual matter power spectrum is used as input. Common fitting formulae, however, strongly underestimate the cosmic-shear power spectra. Halo models provide a better fit to cosmic shear-power spectra, but there are still noticeable deviations. (ii) Cosmic-shear B-modes induced by Born corrections and lens-lens coupling are at least three orders of magnitude smaller than cosmic-shear E-modes. Semi-analytic extensions to the linear approximation predict the right order of magnitude for the B-mode. Compared to the ray-tracing results, however, the semi-analytic predictions may differ by a factor two on small scales and also show a different scale dependence. (iii) The linear approximation may under- or overestimate the galaxy-galaxy-lensing shear signal by several percent due to the neglect of magnification bias, which may lead to a correlation between the shear and the observed number density of lenses. We conclude: (i) Current semi-analytic models need to be improved in order to match the degree of statistical accuracy expected for future weak-lensing surveys. (ii) Shear B-modes induced by corrections to the linear approximation are not important for future cosmic-shear surveys. (iii) Magnification bias can be important for galaxy-galaxy-lensing surveys.
  • We study the correlation between the locations of galaxy-galaxy strong lensing candidates and tracers of large-scale structure from both weak lensing or X-ray emission. The COSMOS survey is a unique data set, combining deep, high resolution and contiguous imaging in which strong lenses have been discovered, plus unparalleled multiwavelength coverage. To help interpret the COSMOS data, we have also produced mock COSMOS strong and weak lensing observations, based on ray-tracing through the Millenium simulation. In agreement with the simulations, we find that strongly lensed images with the largest angular separations are found in the densest regions of the COSMOS field. This is explained by a prevalence among the lens population in dense environments of elliptical galaxies with high total-to-stellar mass ratios, which can deflect light through larger angles. However, we also find that the overall fraction of elliptical galaxies with strong gravitational lensing is independent of the local mass density; this observation is not true of the simulations, which predict an increasing fraction of strong lenses in dense environments. The discrepancy may be a real effect, but could also be explained by various limitations of our analysis. For example, our visual search of strong lens systems could be incomplete and suffer from selection bias; the luminosity function of elliptical galaxies may differ between our real and simulated data; or the simplifying assumptions and approximations used in our lensing simulations may be inadequate. Work is therefore ongoing. Automated searches for strong lens systems will be particularly important in better constraining the selection function.
  • The magnetic properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) (Ga, Mn)As and (Ga, Mn)N are investigated by means of an effective Heisenberg model, whose exchange parameters are obtained from first-principle calculations. The finite-temperature properties of the model are studied numerically using a method based upon the Tyablikov approximation. The method properly incorporates the effects of positional disorder present in DMS. The resulting Curie temperatures for (Ga, Mn)As are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Due to percolation effects and noncollinear magnetic structures at higher Mn concentrations, our calculations predict for (Ga, Mn)N very low Curie temperatures compared to mean-field estimates.
  • The influence of substitutional disorder on the magnetic properties of diluted Heisenberg spin systems is studied with regard to the magnetic stability of ferromagnetic diluted semiconductors (DMS). The equation of motion for the magnon Green's function within Tyablikov approximation is solved numerically for finite systems. The resulting spectral density is then used to estimate the magnetization and Curie temperature of an infinite system. This method is suitable for any form of a ferromagnetic exchange interaction. Besides different lattices and spin magnitude $S$, exchange interactions of different range are examined. The results show that, for short-range interaction, no magnetic order exists below the critical percolation concentration, whereas a linear dependence of the Curie temperature on the concentration of spins is found for ferromagnetic long-range interaction.