• We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).
  • ARGONTUBE is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) with an electron drift length of up to 5 m equipped with cryogenic charge-sensitive preamplifiers. In this work, we present results on its performance including a comparison of the new cryogenic charge-sensitive preamplifiers with the previously used room-temperature-operated charge preamplifiers.
  • ARGONTUBE is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr TPC) with a drift field generated in-situ by a Greinacher voltage multiplier circuit. We present results on the measurement of the drift-field distribution inside ARGONTUBE using straight ionization tracks generated by an intense UV laser beam. Our analysis is based on a simplified model of the charging of a multi-stage Greinacher circuit to describe the voltages on the field cage rings.
  • We present a method to reach electric field intensity as high as 400 kV/cm in liquid argon for cathode-ground distances of several millimeters. This can be achieved by suppressing field emission from the cathode, overcoming limitations that we reported earlier.
  • We report on the design, construction, and operation of a PID temperature controlled and vacuum tight camera casing. The camera casing contains a commercial digital camera and a lighting system. The design of the camera casing and its components are discussed in detail. Pictures taken by this cryo-camera while immersed in argon vapour and liquid nitrogen are presented. The cryo-camera can provide a live view inside cryogenic set-ups and allows to record video.
  • The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) is a prime type of detector for future large-mass neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. In this paper we present the design and operation, as well as experimental results from ARGONTUBE, a LArTPC being operated at the AEC-LHEP, University of Bern. The main goal of this detector is to prove the feasibility of charge drift over very long distances in liquid argon. Many other aspects of the LArTPC technology are also investigated, such as a voltage multiplier to generate high voltage in liquid argon (Greinacher circuit), a cryogenic purification system and the application of multi-photon ionization of liquid argon by a UV laser. For the first time, tracks induced by cosmic muons and UV laser beam pulses have been observed and studied at drift distances of up to 5m, the longest reached to date.
  • A successfull application of Geiger-mode multipixel avalanche diodes (GMAPDs) for pulse-shape discrimination in alpha-beta spectrometry using organic liquid scintillator is described in this paper. Efficient discrimination of alpha and beta components in the emission of radioactive isotopes is achieved for alpha energies above 0.3 MeV. The ultra-compact design of the scintillating detector helps to efficiently suppress cosmic-ray and ambient radiation background. This approach allows construction of hand-held robust devices for monitoring of radioactive contamination in various environmental conditions.
  • In this paper we describe the technology of building a vacuum-tight high voltage feedthrough which is able to operate at voltages up to 30 kV. The feedthrough has a coaxial structure with a grounded sheath which makes it capable to lead high voltage potentials into cryogenic liquids, without risk of surface discharges in the gas phase above the liquid level. The feedthrough is designed to be used in ionization detectors, based on liquefied noble gases, such as Argon or Xenon.
  • In this paper we report on a detailed study of ionization signals produced by Compton electrons and alpha-particles in a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) flled with different mixtures of liquid Argon and Nitrogen. The measurements were carried out with Nitrogen concentrations up to 15% and a drift electric feld in the range 0-50 kV/cm. A prediction for proton ionization signals is made by means of interpolation. This study has been conducted in view of the possible use of liquid Ar-N2 TPCs for the detection of gamma-rays in the resonant band of the Nitrogen absorption spectrum, a promising technology for security and medical applications.
  • In this paper we report on the evidence for ionization track signals from cosmic ray muons and Compton electrons in a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) filled with liquid Argon and doped with different fractions of Nitrogen. This study has been conducted in view of the possible use of liquid Argon/Nitrogen TPCs for the detection of gamma rays in the resonant band of the Nitrogen absorbtion spectrum, a promising technology for security and medical applications.
  • The ORPHEUS dark matter detector is operating at our underground laboratory in Bern (70 m.w.e.). The detector relies on measuring the magnetic flux variation produced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) as they heat micron-sized superheated superconducting tin granules (SSG) and induce superconducting-to-normal phase transitions. In an initial phase, 0.45 kg of tin granules in a segmented detector volume have been used. In this paper a general description of the experimental set-up, overall performance of the detector, and first results are presented.
  • This work is part of an ongoing project to develop a Superheated Superconducting Granule (SSG) detector for cold dark matter and neutrinos. The response of SSG devices to nuclear recoils has been explored irradiating SSG detectors with a 70MeV neutron beam. The aim of the experiment was to test the sensitivity of Sn, Al and Zn SSG detectors to nuclear recoil energies down to a few keV. The detector consisted of a hollow teflon cylinder (0.1cm$^3$ inner volume) filled with tiny superconducting metastable granules embedded in a dielectric medium. The nuclear recoil energies deposited in the SSG were determined measuring the neutron scattering angles with a neutron hodoscope. Coincidences in time between the SSG and the hodoscope signals have been clearly established. In this paper the results of the neutron irradiation experiments at different SSG intrinsic thresholds are discussed and compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that SSG are sensitive to recoil energies down to $\sim$1keV. The limited angular resolution of the neutron hodoscope prevented us from measuring the SSG sensitivity to even lower recoil energies.