• The fundamental phenomenon of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) has been observed in different systems of real and quasi-particles. The condensation of real particles is achieved through a major reduction in temperature while for quasi-particles a mechanism of external injection of bosons by irradiation is required. Here, we present a novel and universal approach to enable BEC of quasi-particles and to corroborate it experimentally by using magnons as the Bose-particle model system. The critical point to this approach is the introduction of a disequilibrium of magnons with the phonon bath. After heating to an elevated temperature, a sudden decrease in the temperature of the phonons, which is approximately instant on the time scales of the magnon system, results in a large excess of incoherent magnons. The consequent spectral redistribution of these magnons triggers the Bose-Einstein condensation.
  • We investigate spin pumping phenomena in polycrystalline CoFeB/Pt and CoFeB/Ta bilayers and the correlation between the effective spin mixing conductance $g^{\uparrow\downarrow}_{\rm eff}$ and the obtained voltages generated by the spin-to-charge current conversion via the inverse spin Hall effect in the Pt and Ta layers. For this purpose we measure the in-plane angular dependence of the generated voltages on the external static magnetic field and we apply a model to separate the spin pumping signal from the one generated by the spin rectification effect in the magnetic layer. Our results reveal a dominating role of anomalous Hall effect for the spin rectification effect with CoFeB and a lack of correlation between $g^{\uparrow\downarrow}_{\rm eff}$ and inverse spin Hall voltages pointing to a strong role of the magnetic proximity effect in Pt in understanding the observed increased damping. This is additionally reflected on the presence of a linear dependency of the Gilbert damping parameter on the Pt thickness.
  • Wrapping around the Milky Way, the Sagittarius stream is the dominant substructure in the halo. Our statistical selection method has allowed us to identify 106 highly likely members of the Sagittarius stream. Spectroscopic analysis of metallicity and kinematics of all members provides us with a new mapping of the Sagittarius stream. We find correspondence between the velocity distribution of stream stars and those computed for a triaxial model of the Milky Way dark matter halo. The Sagittarius trailing arm exhibits a metallicity gradient, ranging from $-0.59$ dex to $-0.97$ dex over 142$^{\circ}$. This is consistent with the scenario of tidal disruption from a progenitor dwarf galaxy that possessed an internal metallicity gradient. We note high metallicity dispersion in the leading arm, causing a lack of detectable gradient and possibly indicating orbital phase mixing. We additionally report on a potential detection of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal in our data.
  • The GALAH survey is a large high-resolution spectroscopic survey using the newly commissioned HERMES spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The HERMES spectrograph provides high-resolution (R ~28,000) spectra in four passbands for 392 stars simultaneously over a 2 degree field of view. The goal of the survey is to unravel the formation and evolutionary history of the Milky Way, using fossil remnants of ancient star formation events which have been disrupted and are now dispersed throughout the Galaxy. Chemical tagging seeks to identify such dispersed remnants solely from their common and unique chemical signatures; these groups are unidentifiable from their spatial, photometric or kinematic properties. To carry out chemical tagging, the GALAH survey will acquire spectra for a million stars down to V~14. The HERMES spectra of FGK stars contain absorption lines from 29 elements including light proton-capture elements, alpha-elements, odd-Z elements, iron-peak elements and n-capture elements from the light and heavy s-process and the r-process. This paper describes the motivation and planned execution of the GALAH survey, and presents some results on the first-light performance of HERMES.
  • Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the most tantalizing mysteries of the radio sky; their progenitors and origins remain unknown and until now no rapid multiwavelength follow-up of an FRB has been possible. New instrumentation has decreased the time between observation and discovery from years to seconds, and enables polarimetry to be performed on FRBs for the first time. We have discovered an FRB (FRB 140514) in real-time on 14 May, 2014 at 17:14:11.06 UTC at the Parkes radio telescope and triggered follow-up at other wavelengths within hours of the event. FRB 140514 was found with a dispersion measure (DM) of 562.7(6) cm$^{-3}$ pc, giving an upper limit on source redshift of $z \lesssim 0.5$. FRB 140514 was found to be 21$\pm$7% (3-$\sigma$) circularly polarized on the leading edge with a 1-$\sigma$ upper limit on linear polarization $<10%$. We conclude that this polarization is intrinsic to the FRB. If there was any intrinsic linear polarization, as might be expected from coherent emission, then it may have been depolarized by Faraday rotation caused by passing through strong magnetic fields and/or high density environments. FRB 140514 was discovered during a campaign to re-observe known FRB fields, and lies close to a previous discovery, FRB 110220; based on the difference in DMs of these bursts and time-on-sky arguments, we attribute the proximity to sampling bias and conclude that they are distinct objects. Follow-up conducted by 12 telescopes observing from X-ray to radio wavelengths was unable to identify a variable multiwavelength counterpart, allowing us to rule out models in which FRBs originate from nearby ($z < 0.3$) supernovae and long duration gamma-ray bursts.
  • We present results from the largest CaII triplet line metallicity study of Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) field red giant stars to date, involving 3037 objects spread across approximately 37.5 sq. deg., centred on this galaxy. We find a median metallicity of [Fe/H]=-0.99+/-0.01, with clear evidence for an abundance gradient of -0.075+/-0.011 dex / deg. over the inner 5 deg. We interpret the abundance gradient to be the result of an increasing fraction of young stars with decreasing galacto-centric radius, coupled with a uniform global age-metallicity relation. We also demonstrate that the age-metallicity relation for an intermediate age population located 10kpc in front of the NE of the Cloud is indistinguishable from that of the main body of the galaxy, supporting a prior conjecture that this is a stellar analogue of the Magellanic Bridge. The metal poor and metal rich quartiles of our RGB star sample (with complementary optical photometry from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey) are predominantly older and younger than approximately 6Gyr, respectively. Consequently, we draw a link between a kinematical signature, tentatively associated by us with a disk-like structure, and the upsurges in stellar genesis imprinted on the star formation history of the central regions of the SMC. We conclude that the increase in the star formation rate around 5-6Gyr ago was most likely triggered by an interaction between the SMC and LMC.
  • We present results from an extensive spectroscopic survey of field stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). 3037 sources, predominantly first-ascent red giants, spread across roughly 37.5 sq. deg, are analysed. The line of sight velocity field is dominated by the projection of the orbital motion of the SMC around the LMC/Milky Way. The residuals are inconsistent with both a non-rotating spheroid and a nearly face on disk system. The current sample and previous stellar and HI kinematics can be reconciled by rotating disk models with line of nodes position angle, theta, ~ 120-130 deg., moderate inclination (i ~ 25-70 deg.), and rotation curves rising at 20-40 km/s/kpc. The metal-poor stars exhibit a lower velocity gradient and higher velocity dispersion than the metal-rich stars. If our interpretation of the velocity patterns as bulk rotation is appropriate, then some revision to simulations of the SMC orbit is required since these are generally tuned to the SMC disk line-of-nodes lying in a NE-SW direction. Residuals show strong spatial structure indicative of non-circular motions that increase in importance with increasing distance from the SMC centre. Kinematic substructure in the north-west part of our survey area is associated with the tidal tail or Counter-Bridge predicted by simulations. Lower line-of-sight velocities towards the Wing and the larger velocities just beyond the SW end of the SMC Bar are probably associated with stellar components of the Magellanic Bridge and Counter-Bridge, respectively. Our results reinforce the notion that the intermediate-age stellar population of the SMC is subject to substantial stripping by external forces.
  • We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia supernova SN 2012fr, of which 33 were obtained before maximum light. At early times SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II 6355 line which can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II 6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of v~12,000 km/s until at least 5 weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared (IR) triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v~12,000 km/s with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as a high-velocity component beginning at v~31,000 km/s two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. (2009) classification scheme, and on the border between normal and "high-velocity" SNe Ia in the Wang et al. (2009a) system. Though it is a clear member of the "low velocity gradient" (LVG; Benetii et al., 2005) group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution, and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.
  • The flow profile in a capillary gap and the pumping efficiency of an acoustic micropump employing Surface Acoustic Waves is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Such ultrasonic surface waves on a piezoelectric substrate strongly couple to a thin liquid layer and generate an internal streaming within the fluid. Such acoustic streaming can be used for controlled agitation during, e.g., microarray hybridization. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy as complementary tools to investigate the resulting flow profile. The velocity was found to depend on the applied power somewhat weaker than linearly and to decrease fast with the distance from the ultrasound generator on the chip.
  • The results of five years of development of the inner tracking system of the HERA-B experiment and first experience from the data taking period of the year 2000 are reported. The system contains 184 chambers, covering a sensitive area of about 20 * 20 cm2 each. The detector is based on microstrip gas counters (MSGCs) with diamond like coated (DLC) glass wafers and gas electron multipliers (GEMs). The main problems in the development phase were gas discharges in intense hadron beams and aging in a high radiation dose environment. The observation of gas discharges which damage the electrode structure of the MSGC led to the addition of the GEM as a first amplification step. Spurious sparking at the GEM cannot be avoided completely. It does not affect the GEM itself but can produce secondary damage of the MSGC if the electric field between the GEM and the MSGC is above a threshold depending on operation conditions. We observed that aging does not only depend on the dose but also on the spot size of the irradiated area. Ar-DME mixtures had to be abandoned whereas a mixture of 70% Ar and 30% CO2 showed no serious aging effects up to about 40 mC/cm deposited charge on the anodes. X-ray measurements indicate that the DLC of the MSGC is deteriorated by the gas amplification process. As a consequence, long term gain variations are expected. The Inner Tracker has successfully participated in the data taking at HERA-B during summer 2000.
  • We present a method for solving the lightcurve of an eclipsing binary system which contains a Cepheid variable as one of its components as well as the solutions for three eclipsing Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). A geometric model is constructed in which the component stars are assumed to be spherical and on circular orbits. The emergent system flux is computed as a function of time, with the intrinsic variations in temperature and radius of the Cepheid treated self-consistently. Fitting the adopted model to photometric observations, incorporating data from multiple bandpasses, yields a single parameter set best describing the system. This method is applied to three eclipsing Cepheid systems from the MACHO Project LMC database: MACHO ID's 6.6454.5, 78.6338.24 and 81.8997.87. A best-fit value is obtained for each system's orbital period and inclination and for the relative radius, color and limb-darkening coefficients of each star. Pulsation periods and parameterizations of the intrinsic color variations of the Cepheids are also obtained and the amplitude of the radial pulsation of each Cepheid is measured directly. The system 6.6454.5 is found to contain a 4.97-day Cepheid, which cannot be definitely classified as Type I or Type II, with an unexpectedly brighter companion. The system 78.6338.24 consists of a 17.7-day, W Vir Class Type II Cepheid with a smaller, dimmer companion. The system 81.8997.87 contains an intermediate-mass, 2.03-day overtone Cepheid with a dimmer, red giant secondary.
  • The DJEHUTY project is an intensive effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to produce a general purpose 3-D stellar structure and evolution code to study dynamic processes in whole stars.
  • We present a status report of a variety of projects related to heavy quark production and parton distributions for the Tevatron Run II.
  • We discuss issues of QCD at the LHC including parton distributions, Monte Carlo event generators, the available next-to-leading order calculations, resummation, photon production, small x physics, double parton scattering, and backgrounds to Higgs production.
  • We explore the ability of the Large Hadron Collider to measure the mass of the W boson. We believe that a precision better than 15 MeV could be attained, based on a year of operation at low luminosity (10^{33} cm^-2 s^-1). If this is true, this measurement will be the world's best determination of the W mass
  • In this contribution I briefly summarize several topics related to the measurement of the W-boson mass, M_W, at hadron colliders.
  • It is possible that quarks and/or leptons have substructure that will become manifest at high energies. Here we investigate the limits on the muon compositeness scale that could be obtained at the First Muon Collider using Bhabha scattering. We study this limit as a function of the collider energy and the angular cut imposed by the detector capability.
  • Methods for measuring the W-boson properties at hadron colliders are discussed. It is demonstrated that the ratio between the W- and Z-boson observables can be reliably calculated using perturbative QCD, even when the individual W- and Z-boson observables are not. Hence, by using a measured Z-boson observable and the perturbative calculation of the ratio of the W- over Z-boson observable, we can accurately predict the W-boson observable. The use of the ratio reduces both the experimental and theoretical systematic uncertainties substantially. Compared to the currently used methods it might, at high luminosity, result in a smaller overall uncertainty on the measured W-boson mass and width.
  • We summarize the activity of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup during Snowmass 96.
  • We explore the ability of the Large Hadron Collider to measure the mass of the W boson. We believe that a precision better than ~ 15 MeV could be attained, based on a year of operation at low luminosity (10^(33)cm^(-2)s^(-1)). If this is true, this measurement will be the world's best determination of the W mass. We feel this interesting opportunity warrants investigation in more detail.
  • Little information is known about the polarization of gluons inside a longitudinally polarized proton. I report on the sensitivity of photoproduction experiments to it. Both jet and heavy quark production are considered.
  • Little information is known about the polarization of gluons inside a longitudinally polarized proton. We investigate the sensitivity of photoproduction experiments with both beam and target longitudinally polarized to the polarization of the gluon distribution in the proton. We study the photoproduction of jets and heavy quarks and conclude that they are both sensitive to the gluon polarization.