• In condensed matter physics, disorder and interactions lead to non-trivial low-energy physics, which goes beyond non-interacting Anderson localization. In that respect, doped quantum antiferromagnets offer a unique playground to address this subtle interplay between impurities and many-body effects. Coupled spin-1 chains material Ni(Cl$_{1-x}$Br$_x$)$_2$-4SC(NH$_2$)$_2$ (DTN), randomly doped with Br impurities, is expected to be a perfect candidate for observing many-body localization at high magnetic field: the so-called "Bose glass", a zero-temperature bosonic fluid, compressible, gapless, incoherent and short-range correlated. Using nuclear magnetic resonance we critically address the stability of the Bose glass in doped DTN, and find that it hosts a novel disorder-induced ordered state of matter, where many-body physics leads to a resurgence of quantum coherence emerging from localized states. Large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations perfectly support this experimental finding.
  • Observing how electronic states in solids react to a local symmetry breaking provides insight into their microscopic nature. A striking example is the formation of bound states when quasiparticles are scattered off defects. This is known to occur, under specific circumstances, in some metals and superconductors but not, in general, in the charge-density-wave (CDW) state. Here, we report the unforeseen observation of bound states when a magnetic field quenches superconductivity and induces long-range CDW order in YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_y$. Bound states indeed produce an inhomogeneous pattern of the local density of states $N(E_F)$ that leads to a skewed distribution of Knight shifts which is detected here through an asymmetric profile of $^{17}$O NMR lines. We argue that the effect arises most likely from scattering off defects in the CDW state, which provides a novel case of disorder-induced bound states in a condensed-matter system and an insightful window into charge ordering in the cuprates.
  • We present two methods to determine whether the interactions in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) state of a spin-$1/2$ Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladder are attractive or repulsive. The first method combines two bulk measurements, of magnetization and specific heat, to deduce the TLL parameter that distinguishes between the attraction and repulsion. The second one is based on a local-probe, NMR measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation. For the strong-leg spin ladder compound $\mathrm{(C_7H_{10}N)_2CuBr_4}$ we find that the isothermal magnetic field dependence of the relaxation rate, $T_1^{-1}(H)$, displays a concave curve between the two critical fields that bound the TLL regime. This is in sharp contrast to the convex curve previously reported for a strong-rung ladder $\mathrm{(C_5H_{12}N)_2CuBr_4}$. Within the TLL description, we show that the concavity directly reflects the attractive interactions, while the convexity reflects the repulsive ones.
  • The recent detection of charge-density modulations in YBa2Cu3Oy and other cuprate superconductors raises new questions about the normal state of underdoped cuprates. In one class of theories, the modulations are intertwined with pairing in a dual state, expected to persist up to high magnetic fields as a vortex liquid. In support of such a state, specific heat and magnetisation data on YBa2Cu3Oy have been interpreted in terms of a vortex liquid persisting above the vortex-melting field Hvs at T = 0. Here we report high-field measurements of the electrical and thermal Hall conductivities in YBa2Cu3O6.54 that allow us to probe the Wiedemann-Franz law, a sensitive test of the presence of superconductivity in a metal. In the T = 0 limit, we find that the law is satisfied for fields immediately above Hvs. This rules out the existence of a vortex liquid and it places strict constraints on the nature of the normal state in underdoped cuprates.
  • We report single-crystal 51V NMR studies on volborthite Cu3V2O7(OH)2dot2H2O, which is regarded as a quasi-two-dimensional frustrated magnet with competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions. In the 1/3 magnetization plateau above 28 T, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 indicates an excitation gap with a large effective g factor of about 5.5 pm 0.7, pointing to magnon bound states. At 18-24 T, 1/T1 shows power-law-like temperature dependence 1/T1 propto T^a. The negative a above 22 T indicates unusual slowing down of spin fluctuations in the high-field phase, where the NMR spectra indicate small internal fields with Gaussian-like distribution. These results suggest that condensation of magnon bound states leads to a novel phase below the magnetization plateau, which may be a spin nematic phase.
  • We simulate the collective dynamics in spin lattices with long range interactions and collective decay in one, two and three dimensions. Starting from a dynamical mean-field approach derived by local factorization of the density operator we improve the numerical approximation of the full master equation by including pair correlations at any distance. This truncations enable us to drastically increase the number of spins in our numerical simulations from about ten spins in case of the full quantum model to several ten-thousands in the mean-field approximation and a few hundreds if pair correlations are included. Extensive numerical tests help us identify interaction strengths and geometric configurations where these approximations perform well and allow us to state fairly simple error estimates. By simulating systems of increasing size we show that in one and two dimensions we can include as many spins as needed to capture the properties of infinite size systems with high accuracy, while in 3D the method does not converge to desired accuracy within the system sizes we can currently implement. Our approach is well suited to give error estimates of magic wavelength optical lattices for atomic clock applications and corresponding super radiant lasers.
  • Quantum oscillations and negative Hall and Seebeck coefficients at low temperature and high magnetic field have shown the Fermi surface of underdoped cuprates to contain a small closed electron pocket. It is thought to result from a reconstruction by charge order, but whether it is the order seen by NMR and ultrasound above a threshold field or the short-range modulations seen by X-ray diffraction in zero field is unclear. Here we use measurements of the thermal Hall conductivity in YBCO to show that Fermi-surface reconstruction occurs only above a sharply defined onset field, equal to the transition field seen in ultrasound. This reveals that electrons do not experience long-range broken translational symmetry in the zero-field ground state, and hence in zero field there is no quantum critical point for the onset of charge order as a function of doping.
  • We have synthesized high-quality single crystals of volborthite, a seemingly distorted kagome antiferromagnet, and carried out high-field magnetization measurements up to 74 T and 51V NMR measurements up to 30 T. An extremely wide 1/3 magnetization plateau appears above 28 T and continues over 74 T at 1.4 K, which has not been observed in previous study using polycrystalline samples. NMR spectra reveal an incommensurate order (most likely a spin-density wave order) below 22 T and a simple spin structure in the plateau phase. Moreover, a novel intermediate phase is found between 23 and 26 T, where the magnetization varies linearly with magnetic field and the NMR spectra indicate an inhomogeneous distribution of the internal magnetic field. This sequence of phases in volborthite bear a striking similarity to those of frustrated spin chains with a ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor coupling J1 competing with an antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor coupling J2.
  • We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of $0.074 ~\textrm{cm}^{-1}$, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by RF diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less regular than in the toroidal model, and depends on the point of observation, but is accounted for in a simulation of fields in the fluted chamber. Attention is paid to polarization of the observed fields, and possible coherence of fields produced in adjacent bending magnets. Low frequency wakefield production appears to be mainly local in a single bend, but multi-bend effects cannot be excluded entirely, and could play a role in high frequency resonances. New simulation techniques have been developed, which should be invaluable in further work.
  • The pseudogap regime of high-temperature cuprates harbours diverse manifestations of electronic ordering whose exact nature and universality remain debated. Here, we show that the short-ranged charge order recently reported in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy corresponds to a truly static modulation of the charge density. We also show that this modulation impacts on most electronic properties, that it appears jointly with intra-unit-cell nematic, but not magnetic, order, and that it exhibits differences with the charge density wave observed at lower temperatures in high magnetic fields. These observations prove mostly universal, they place new constraints on the origin of the charge density wave and they reveal that the charge modulation is pinned by native defects. Similarities with results in layered metals such as NbSe2, in which defects nucleate halos of incipient charge density wave at temperatures above the ordering transition, raise the possibility that order-parameter fluctuations, but no static order, would be observed in the normal state of most cuprates if disorder were absent.
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transport measurements have been performed at high magnetic fields and low temperatures in a series of $n$-type Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ crystals. In low density samples, a complete spin polarization of the electronic system is achieved, as observed from the saturation of the isotropic component of the $^{209}$Bi NMR shift above a certain magnetic field. The corresponding spin splitting, defined in the phenomenological approach of a 3D electron gas with a large (spin-orbit-induced) effective $g$-factor, scales as expected with the Fermi energy independently determined by simultaneous transport measurements. Both the effective electronic $g$-factor and the "contact" hyperfine coupling constant are precisely determined. The magnitude of this latter reveals a non negligible $s$-character of the electronic wave function at the bottom of the conduction band. Our results show that the bulk electronic spin polarization can be directly probed via NMR and pave the way for future NMR investigations of the electronic states in Bi-based topological insulators.
  • We use nuclear magnetic resonance to map the complete low-temperature phase diagram of the antiferromagnetic Ising-like spin-chain system BaCo2V2O8 as a function of the magnetic field applied along the chains. In contrast to the predicted crossover from the longitudinal incommensurate phase to the transverse antiferromagnetic phase, we find a sequence of three magnetically ordered phases between the critical fields 3.8 T and 22.8 T. Their origin is traced to the giant magnetic-field dependence of the total effective coupling between spin chains, extracted to vary by a factor of 24. We explain this novel phenomenon as emerging from the combination of nontrivially coupled spin chains and incommensurate spin fluctuations in the chains treated as Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids.
  • Superconductivity is a quantum phenomena arising, in its simplest form, from pairing of fermions with opposite spin into a state with zero net momentum. Whether superconductivity can occur in fermionic systems with unequal number of two species distinguished by spin, atomic hyperfine states, flavor, presents an important open question in condensed matter, cold atoms, and quantum chromodynamics, physics. In the former case the imbalance between spin-up and spin-down electrons forming the Cooper pairs is indyced by the magnetic field. Nearly fifty years ago Fulde, Ferrell, Larkin and Ovchinnikov (FFLO) proposed that such imbalanced system can lead to exotic superconductivity in which pairs acquire finite momentum. The finite pair momentum leads to spatially inhomogeneous state consisting of of a periodic alternation of "normal" and "superconducting" regions. Here, we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements providing microscopic evidence for the existence of this new superconducting state through the observation of spin-polarized quasiparticles forming so-called Andreev bound states.
  • The upper critical field Hc2 is a fundamental measure of the pairing strength, yet there is no agreement on its magnitude and doping dependence in cuprate superconductors. We have used thermal conductivity as a direct probe of Hc2 in the cuprates YBa2Cu3Oy and YBa2Cu4O8 to show that there is no vortex liquid at T = 0, allowing us to use high-field resistivity measurements to map out the doping dependence of Hc2 across the phase diagram. Hc2(p) exhibits two peaks, each located at a critical point where the Fermi surface undergoes a transformation. The condensation energy obtained directly from Hc2, and previous Hc1 data, undergoes a 20-fold collapse below the higher critical point. These data provide quantitative information on the impact of competing phases in suppressing superconductivity in cuprates.
  • The frequency splitting between the dip and the peak of the resistively detected nuclear magnetic resonance (RDNMR) dispersive line shape (DLS) has been measured in the quantum Hall effect regime as a function of filling factor, carrier density and nuclear isotope. The splitting increases as the filling factor tends to {\nu} = 1 and is proportional to the hyperfine coupling, similar to the usual Knight shift versus {\nu}-dependence. The peak frequency shifts linearly with magnetic field throughout the studied filling factor range and matches the unshifted substrate signal, detected by classical NMR. Thus, the evolution of the splitting is entirely due to the changing Knight shift of the dip feature. The nuclear spin relaxation time, T1, is extremely long (hours) at precisely the peak frequency. These results are consistent with the local formation of a {\nu} = 2 phase due to the existence of spin singlet D$^-$ complexes.
  • Evidence is mounting that charge order competes with superconductivity in high Tc cuprates. Whether this has any relationship to the pairing mechanism is unknown since neither the universality of the competition nor its microscopic nature has been established. Here using nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that, similar to La214, charge order in YBCO has maximum strength inside the superconducting dome, at doping levels p = 0.11 - 0.12.We further show that the overlap of halos of incipient charge order around vortex cores, similar to those visualised in Bi2212, can explain the threshold magnetic field at which long-range charge order emerges. These results reveal universal features of a competition in which charge order and superconductivity appear as joint instabilities of the same normal state, whose relative balance can be field-tuned in the vortex state.
  • Using 63Cu NMR, we establish that the enhancement of spin order by a magnetic field H in YBa2Cu3O6.45 arises from a competition with superconductivity because the effect occurs for H perpendicular, but not parallel, to the CuO2 planes, and it persists up to field values comparable to Hc2. We also find that the spin-freezing has a glassy nature and that the frozen state onsets at a temperature which is independent of the magnitude of H. These results, together with the presence of a competing charge-ordering instability at nearby doping levels, are strikingly parallel to those previously obtained in La-214. This suggests a universal interpretation of magnetic field effects in underdoped cuprates where the enhancement of spin order by the field may not be the primary phenomenon but rather a byproduct of the competition between superconductivity and charge order. Low-energy spin fluctuations are manifested up to relatively high temperatures where they partially mask the signature of the pseudogap in 1/T1 data of planar Cu sites.
  • In order to understand the nature of the two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensed (BEC) phase in BaCuSi2O6, we performed detailed 63Cu and 29Si NMR above the critical magnetic field, Hc1= 23.4 T. The two different alternating layers present in the system have very different local magnetizations close to Hc1; one is very weak, and its size and field dependence are highly sensitive to the nature of inter-layer coupling. Its precise value could only be determined by "on-site" 63Cu NMR, and the data are fully reproduced by a model of interacting hard-core bosons in which the perfect frustration associated to tetragonal symmetry is slightly lifted, leading to the conclusion that the population of the less populated layers is not fully incoherent but must be partially condensed.
  • Using $^{63,65}$Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in magnetic fields up to 30 T we study the microscopic properties of the 12-site valence-bond-solid ground state in the "pinwheel" kagome compound Rb$_2$Cu$_3$SnF$_{12}$. We find that the ground state is characterized by a strong transverse staggered spin polarization whose temperature and field dependence points to a mixing of the singlet and triplet states. This is further corroborated by the field dependence of the gap $\Delta (H)$, which has a level anticrossing with a large minimum gap value of $\approx \Delta (0)/2$, with no evidence of a phase transition down to 1.5\,K. By the exact diagonalization of small clusters, we show that the observed anticrossing is mainly due to staggered tilts of the $g$-tensors defined by the crystal structure, and reveal symmetry properties of the low-energy excitation spectrum compatible with the absence of level crossing.
  • The field-induced quantum phase transitions (QPT) of the spin ladder material Bi(Cu(1-x)Znx)2PO6 have been investigated via 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on single-crystal samples with x = 0 and x = 0.01. Measurements at temperatures between 0.25 K and 20 K in magnetic fields up to 31 T served to establish the nature of the various phases. In BiCu2PO6, an incommensurate (IC) magnetic order develops above a critical field mu0*H(c1) ~ 21 T; the field and temperature dependences of the NMR lines and the resulting model for the spin structure are discussed. Supported by results of Density-Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) calculations it is argued that the observed field-induced IC order involves the formation of a magnetic-soliton lattice. An additional QPT is predicted to occur at H > H(c1). For x = 0.01, this IC order is found to be stable against site disorder, although with a renormalized critical field.
  • The interplay between superconductivity and any other competing order is an essential part of the long-standing debate on the origin of high temperature superconductivity in cuprates. Akin to the situation of heavy fermions, organic superconductors and pnictides, it has been proposed that the pairing mechanism in cuprates comes from fluctuations of a nearby quantum phase transition. Recent evidence of charge modulation and the associated fluctuations in the pseudogap phase of YBa_2Cu_3O_y make charge order a likely candidate for a competing order. However, a thermodynamic signature of the charge ordering phase transition is still lacking. Moreover, whether such charge order is one- or two-dimensional is still controversial but pivotal for the understanding the topology of the reconstructed Fermi surface. Here we address both issues by measuring sound velocities in YBCO_6.55 in high magnetic fields, a powerful thermodynamic probe to detect phase transitions. We provide the first thermodynamic signature of the field-induced charge ordering phase transition in YBCO allowing construction of a field-temperature phase diagram, which reveals the competing nature of this charge order. The comparison of different acoustic modes indicates that the charge modulation has a two-dimensional character, thus imposing strong constraints on Fermi surface reconstruction scenarios.
  • Electronic charges introduced in copper-oxide planes generate high-transition temperature superconductivity but, under special circumstances, they can also order into filaments called stripes. Whether an underlying tendency of charges to order is present in all cuprates and whether this has any relationship with superconductivity are, however, two highly controversial issues. In order to uncover underlying electronic orders, magnetic fields strong enough to destabilise superconductivity can be used. Such experiments, including quantum oscillations in YBa2Cu3Oy (a notoriously clean cuprate where charge order is not observed) have suggested that superconductivity competes with spin, rather than charge, order. Here, using nuclear magnetic resonance, we demonstrate that high magnetic fields actually induce charge order, without spin order, in the CuO2 planes of YBa2Cu3Oy. The observed static, unidirectional, modulation of the charge density breaks translational symmetry, thus explaining quantum oscillation results, and we argue that it is most likely the same 4a-periodic modulation as in stripe-ordered cuprates. The discovery that it develops only when superconductivity fades away and near the same 1/8th hole doping as in La2-xBaxCuO4 suggests that charge order, although visibly pinned by CuO chains in YBa2Cu3Oy, is an intrinsic propensity of the superconducting planes of high Tc cuprates.
  • The influence of microwave irradiation on dissipative and Hall resistance in high-quality bilayer electron systems is investigated experimentally. We observe a deviation from odd symmetry under magnetic field reversal in the microwave-induced Hall resistance $\Delta R_{xy}$ whereas the dissipative resistance $\Delta R_{xx}$ obeys even symmetry. Studies of $\Delta R_{xy}$ as a function of the microwave electric field and polarization exhibit a strong and non-trivial power and polarization dependence. The obtained results are discussed in connection to existing theoretical models of microwave-induced photoconductivity.
  • The transition from the 1/3 magnetization plateau towards the saturation magnetization in azurite has been studied by low-temperature, high-magnetic-field, high-frequency proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The observed symmetrical splitting of the NMR spectra is incompatible with the longitudinal incommensurate order appearing when the longitudinal correlation function becomes dominant over the transverse one, which is the expected framework for the existence of the 2/3 magnetization plateau. The spectra are rather interpreted in terms of a more standard transverse antiferromagnetic (canted) order.
  • We present a fiber sensor based on an active integrated component which could be effectively used to measure the longitudinal vibration modes of telescope mirrors in an interferometric array. We demonstrate the possibility to measure vibrations with frequencies up to $\simeq 100$ Hz with a precision better than 10 nm.