• The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis gained notoriety in 2002 when it brightened nine magnitudes in a series of three outbursts and then rapidly evolved into an extremely cool supergiant. We present optical, near-IR, and mid-IR spectroscopic and photometric observations of V838 Monocerotis obtained between 2008 and 2012 at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m, NASA IRTF 3m, and Gemini South 8m telescopes. We contemporaneously analyze the optical & IR spectroscopic properties of V838 Monocerotis to arrive at a revised spectral type L3 supergiant and effective temperature Teff~2000--2200 K. Because there are no existing optical observational data for L supergiants in the optical, we speculate that V838 Monocerotis may represent the prototype for L supergiants in this wavelength regime. We find a low level of Halpha emission present in the system, consistent with interaction between V838 Monocerotis and its B3V binary; however, we cannot rule out a stellar collision as the genesis event, which could result in the observed Halpha activity. Based upon a two-component blackbody fit to all wavelengths of our data, we conclude that, as of 2009, a shell of ejecta surrounded V838 Monocerotis at a radius of R=263+/-10 AU with a temperature of T=285+/-2 K. This result is consistent with IR interferometric observations from the same era and predictions from the Lynch et al. model of the expanding system, which provides a simple framework for understanding this complicated system.
  • This summary reports on papers presented at the Cool Stars-16 meeting in the splinter session "Solar and Stellar flares." Although many topics were discussed, the main themes were the commonality of interests, and of physics, between the solar and stellar flare communities, and the opportunities for important new observations in the near future.
  • We detect radio emission in an additional two epochs of the ultracool dwarf binary LP 349- 25, finding that the observed emission is broadband and steady on timescales between 10s and 10.7 hours, as well as on timescales of 0.6 and 1.6 years. This system is unusual for ultracool dwarfs with detectable radio emission, in exhibiting a lack of any large scale variability, particularly the bursting (periodic or aperiodic) behavior exhibited by the other objects with detectable levels of radio emission. We explore the constraints that the lack of variability on long and short timescales, and flat spectral index, imply about the radio-emitting structures and mechanism. The temporal constraints argue for a high latitude emitting region with a large inclination so that it is always in view, and survives for at least 0.6 year. Temporal constraints also limit the plasma conditions, implying that the electron density be n_e <4x10^5 cm-3 and B < 130 G in order not to see time variations due to collisional or radiative losses from high energy particles. The observations and constraints provided by them are most compatible with a nonthermal radio emission mechanism, likely gyrosynchrotron emission from a spatially homogeneous or inhomogeneous source. This indicates that, similar to behaviors noted for chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasmas in ultracool dwarfs, the magnetic activity patterns observed in active higher mass stars can survive to the substellar boundary. We also present new epochs of multi-frequency radio observations for the the ultracool dwarfs 2MASS 05233822-140322 and 2MASS14563831-2809473(=LHS 3003); each has been detected in at least one previous epoch but are not detected in the epochs reported here.
  • We present 838 ab-type RR Lyrae stars from the Lowell Observatory Near Earth Objects Survey Phase I (LONEOS-I). These objects cover 1430 deg^2 and span distances ranging from 3-30 kpc from the Galactic Center. Object selection is based on phased, photometric data with 28-50 epochs. We use this large sample to explore the bulk properties of the stellar halo, including the spatial distribution. The period-amplitude distribution of this sample shows that the majority of these RR Lyrae stars resemble Oosterhoff type I, but there is a significant fraction (26 %) which have longer periods and appear to be Oosterhoff type II. We find that the radial distributions of these two populations have significantly different profiles (rho_{OoI} ~ R^(-2.26 +- 0.07) and rho_{OoII} ~ R^(-2.88 +- 0.11). This suggests that the stellar halo was formed by at least two distinct accretion processes and supports dual-halo models.
  • We report on multi-wavelength observations spanning radio to X-ray wavelengths of the M dwarf flare star, EV Lacertae, probing the characteristics of the outer atmospheric plasma from the upper chromosphere to the corona. We detect the star at a wavelength of 2 cm (15 GHz) for the first time. UV and FUV line profiles show evidence of nonthermal broadening, and the velocity width appear to peak at lower temperatures than in the Sun; this trend is confirmed in another active M dwarf flare star. Electron density measurements indicate nearly constant electron pressures between $\log T=$5.2 and 6.4. At higher coronal temperatures, there is a sharp increase of two orders of magnitude in density (n$_{e}\sim10^{13}$ cm$^{-3}$ at $\log T=$6.9). X-ray, EUV, FUV and NUV spectra constrain the DEM from the upper chromosphere through the corona. The coronal pressures are inconsistent with the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, either through EM modeling or application of scaling laws, and imply large conductive loss rates and a large energy input at the highest temperatures. The timescales for radiative and conductive losses in EV Lac's upper atmosphere imply that significant continued heating must occur for the corona to maintain its quiescent properties. The high frequency radio detection requires the high temperature X-ray-emitting coronal plasma to be spatially distinct from the radio emission source. Length scales in the low-temperature corona are markedly larger than those in the high-temperature corona, further suggestions of an inhomogeneous mixture of thermal and nonthermal coronal plasma.
  • Characterizing the nature and spatial distribution of the lensing objects that produce the previously measured microlensing optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains an open problem. We present an appraisal of the ability of the SuperMACHO Project, a next-generation microlensing survey directed toward the LMC, to discriminate between various proposed lensing populations. We consider two scenarios: lensing by a uniform foreground screen of objects and self-lensing by LMC stars. We have carried out extensive simulations, based upon data obtained during the first year of the project, to assess the SuperMACHO survey's ability to discriminate between these two scenarios. We find that the event rate itself shows significant sensitivity to the choice of the LMC luminosity function, limiting the conclusions which can be drawn from the absolute rate. If instead we determine the differential event rate across the LMC, we will decrease the impact of these systematic biases and render our conclusions more robust. With this approach the SuperMACHO Project should be able to distinguish between the two categories of lens populations. This will provide important constraints on the nature of the lensing objects and their contributions to the Galactic dark matter halo.
  • We report on radiative hydrodynamic simulations of moderate and strong solar flares. The flares were simulated by calculating the atmospheric response to a beam of non-thermal electrons injected at the apex of a one-dimensional closed coronal loop, and include heating from thermal soft X-ray, extreme ultraviolet and ultraviolet (XEUV) emission. The equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium were treated in non-LTE and solved for numerous transitions of hydrogen, helium, and Ca II allowing the calculation of detailed line profiles and continuum emission. This work improves upon previous simulations by incorporating more realistic non-thermal electron beam models and includes a more rigorous model of thermal XEUV heating. We find XEUV backwarming contributes less than 10% of the heating, even in strong flares. The simulations show elevated coronal and transition region densities resulting in dramatic increases in line and continuum emission in both the UV and optical regions. The optical continuum reaches a peak increase of several percent which is consistent with enhancements observed in solar white light flares. For a moderate flare (~M-class), the dynamics are characterized by a long gentle phase of near balance between flare heating and radiative cooling, followed by an explosive phase with beam heating dominating over cooling and characterized by strong hydrodynamic waves. For a strong flare (~X-class), the gentle phase is much shorter, and we speculate that for even stronger flares the gentle phase may be essentially non-existent. During the explosive phase, synthetic profiles for lines formed in the upper chromosphere and transition region show blue shifts corresponding to a plasma velocity of ~120 km/s, and lines formed in the lower chromosphere show red shifts of ~40 km/s.
  • We present the first simultaneous, multi-wavelength observations of an L dwarf, the L3.5 candidate brown dwarf 2MASS J00361617+1821104, conducted with the Very Large Array, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Kitt Peak 4-m telescope. We detect strongly variable and periodic radio emission (P=3 hr) with a fraction of about 60% circular polarization. No X-ray emission is detected to a limit of L_X/L_{bol}<2e-5, several hundred times below the saturation level observed in early M dwarfs. Similarly, we do not detect H-alpha emission to a limit of L_{H-alpha}/L_{bol}<2e-7, the deepest for any L dwarf observed to date. The ratio of radio to X-ray luminosity is at least four orders of magnitude in excess of that observed in a wide range of active stars (including M dwarfs) providing the first direct confirmation that late-M and L dwarfs violate the radio/X-ray correlation. The radio emission is due to gyrosynchrotron radiation in a large-scale magnetic field of about 175 G, which is maintained on timescales longer than three years. The detected 3-hour period may be due to (i) the orbital motion of a companion at a separation of about five stellar radii, similar to the configuration of RS CVn systems, (ii) an equatorial rotation velocity of about 37 km/s and an anchored, long-lived magnetic field, or (iii) periodic release of magnetic stresses in the form of weak flares. In the case of orbital motion, the magnetic activity may be induced by the companion, possibly explaining the unusual pattern of activity and the long-lived signal. We conclude that fully convective stars can maintain a large-scale and stable magnetic field, but the lack of X-ray and H-alpha emission indicates that the atmospheric conditions are markedly different than in early-type stars and even M dwarfs. [abridged]
  • We present the results of a campaign to observe flares on the M dwarf flare star EV Lacertae over the course of two days in 2001 September, utilizing a combination of radio continuum, optical photometric and spectroscopic, ultraviolet spectroscopic, and X-ray spectroscopic observations, to characterize the multi-wavelength nature of flares from this active, single late-type star. We find flares in every wavelength region in which we observed. In the multi-wavelength context, the start of the intense radio flare is coincident with an impulsive optical U-band flare, to within one minute, and yet there is no signature of an X-ray response. There are other intervals of time where optical flaring and UV flaring is occurring, but these cannot be related to the contemporaneous X-ray flaring: the time-integrated luminosities do not match the instantaneous X-ray flare luminosity, as one would expect for the Neupert effect. We investigate the probability of chance occurrences of flares from disparate wavelength regions producing temporal coincidences, but find that not all the flare associations can be explained by a superposition of flares due to a high flaring rate. We caution against making causal associations of multi-wavelength flares based solely on temporal correlations for high flaring rate stars like EV Lac.
  • We present the first results from our next-generation microlensing survey, the SuperMACHO project. We are using the CTIO 4m Blanco telescope and the MOSAIC imager to carry out a search for microlensing toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We plan to ascertain the nature of the population responsible for the excess microlensing rate seen by the MACHO project. Our observing strategy is optimized to measure the differential microlensing rate across the face of the LMC. We find this derivative to be relatively insensitive to the details of the LMC's internal structure but a strong discriminant between Galactic halo and LMC self lensing. In December 2003 we completed our third year of survey operations. 2003 also marked the first year of real-time microlensing alerts and photometric and spectroscopic followup. We have extracted several dozen microlensing candidates, and we present some preliminary light curves and related information. Similar to the MACHO project, we find SNe behind the LMC to be a significant contaminant - this background has not been completely removed from our current single-color candidate sample. Our follow-up strategy is optimized to discriminate between SNe and true microlensing.
  • We report the results of a 45 ks Chandra observation of the cataclysmic variable V426 Ophiuchus. The high resolution spectrum from the high-energy transmission grating spectrometer is most consistent with a cooling flow model, placing V426 Oph among the group of CVs including U Gem and EX Hya. An uninterrupted lightcurve was also constructed, in which we detect a significant 4.2 hr modulation together with its first harmonic at 2.1 hrs. Reanalysis of archival Ginga, and ROSAT X-ray lightcurves also reveals modulations at periods consistent with 4.2 and/or 2.1 hrs. Furthermore, optical photometry in V, simultaneous with the Chandra observation, indicates a modulation anti-correlated with the X-ray, and later more extensive R band photometry finds a signal at ~2.1 hrs. The earlier reported X-ray periods at ~0.5 and 1 hrs appear to be only transient and quasi-periodic in nature. In contrast, the 4.2 hr period or its harmonic are stable and persistent in X-ray/optical data from 1988 to 2003. This periodicity is clearly distinct from the 6.85 hr orbit, and could be due to the spin of the white dwarf. If this is the case, V426 Oph would be the first long period intermediate polar with a ratio P_spin/P_orb of 0.6. However, this interpretation requires unreasonable values of magnetic field strength and mass accretion rate.
  • Continuing our census of late-type dwarfs in the Solar Neighbourhood, we present BVRI photometry and optical spectroscopy of 800 mid-type M dwarfs drawn from the NLTT proper motion catalogue. The targets are taken from both our own cross-referencing of the NLTT catalogue and the 2MASS Second Incremental release, and from the revised NLTT compiled by Salim & Gould (2003). All are identified as nearby-star candidates based on their location in the (m_r, (m_r-K_S)) diagram. Three hundred stars discussed here have previous astrometric, photometric or spectroscopic observations. We present new BVRI photometry for 101 stars, together with low resolution spectroscopy of a further 400 dwarfs. In total, we find that 241 stars are within 20 parsecs of the Sun, while a further 70 lie within 1-sigma of our distance limit. Combining the present results with previous analyses, we have quantitative observations for 1910 of the 1913 candidates in our NLTT nearby-star samples. Eight hundred and fifteen of those stars have distance estimates of 20 parsecs or less, including 312 additions to the local census. With our NLTT follow-up observations essentially complete, we have searched the literature for K and early-type M dwarfs within the sampling volume covered by the 2MASS Second Release. Comparing the resultant 20-parsec census against predicted numbers, derived from the 8-parsec luminosity function, shows an overall deficit of ~20% for stellar systems and ~35% for individual stars. Almost all are likely to be fainter than M_J=7, and at least half are probably companions of known nearby stars. Our results suggest that there are relatively few missing systems at the lowest luminosities, M_J > 8.5. We discuss possible means of identifying the missing stars.
  • We present low-resolution optical spectroscopy and BVRI photometry of 453 candidate nearby stars drawn from the NLTT proper motion catalogue. The stars were selected based on optical/near-infrared colours, derived by combining the NLTT photographic data with photometry from the 2MASS Second Incremental Data Release. Based on the derived photometric and spectroscopic parallaxes, we identify 111 stars as lying within 20 parsecs of the Sun, including 9 stars with formal distance estimates of less than 10 parsecs. A further 53 stars have distance estimates within 1-sigma of our 20-parsec limit. Almost all of those stars are additions to the nearby star census. In total, our NLTT-based survey has so far identified 496 stars likely to be within 20 parsecs, of which 195 are additions to nearby-star catalogues. Most of the newly-identified nearby stars have spectral types between M4 and M8.
  • We report the discovery of a nearby star with a very large proper motion of 5.06 +/- 0.03 arcsec/yr. The star is called SO025300.5+165258 and referred to herein as HPMS (high proper motion star). The discovery came as a result of a search of the SkyMorph database, a sensitive and persistent survey that is well suited for finding stars with high proper motions. There are currently only 7 known stars with proper motions > 5 arcsec/yr. We have determined a preliminary value for the parallax of 0.43 +/- 0.13 arcsec. If this value holds our new star ranks behind only the Alpha Centauri system (including Proxima Centauri) and Barnard's star in the list of our nearest stellar neighbors. The spectrum and measured tangential velocity indicate that HPMS is a main-sequence star with spectral type M6.5. However, if our distance measurement is correct, the HPMS is underluminous by 1.2 +/- 0.7 mag.
  • An extensive sample of M, L and T dwarfs identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been compiled. The sample of 718 dwarfs includes 677 new objects (629 M dwarfs, 48 L dwarfs) together with 41 that have been previously published. All new objects and some of the previously published ones have new optical spectra obtained either with the SDSS spectrographs or with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m ARC telescope. Spectral types and SDSS colors are available for all objects; approximately 35% also have near-infrared magnitudes measured by 2MASS or on the Mauna Kea system. We use this sample to characterize the color--spectral type and color--color relations of late type dwarfs in the SDSS filters, and to derive spectroscopic and photometric parallax relations for use in future studies of the luminosity and mass functions based on SDSS data. We find that the (i*-z*) and (i*-J) colors provide good spectral type and absolute magnitude (M_i*) estimates for M and L dwarfs. Our distance estimates for the current sample indicate that SDSS is finding early M dwarfs out to about 1.5 kpc, L dwarfs to approximately 100 pc and T dwarfs to near 20 pc. The T dwarf photometric data show large scatter and are therefore less reliable for spectral type and distance estimation.
  • We present a method for solving the lightcurve of an eclipsing binary system which contains a Cepheid variable as one of its components as well as the solutions for three eclipsing Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). A geometric model is constructed in which the component stars are assumed to be spherical and on circular orbits. The emergent system flux is computed as a function of time, with the intrinsic variations in temperature and radius of the Cepheid treated self-consistently. Fitting the adopted model to photometric observations, incorporating data from multiple bandpasses, yields a single parameter set best describing the system. This method is applied to three eclipsing Cepheid systems from the MACHO Project LMC database: MACHO ID's 6.6454.5, 78.6338.24 and 81.8997.87. A best-fit value is obtained for each system's orbital period and inclination and for the relative radius, color and limb-darkening coefficients of each star. Pulsation periods and parameterizations of the intrinsic color variations of the Cepheids are also obtained and the amplitude of the radial pulsation of each Cepheid is measured directly. The system 6.6454.5 is found to contain a 4.97-day Cepheid, which cannot be definitely classified as Type I or Type II, with an unexpectedly brighter companion. The system 78.6338.24 consists of a 17.7-day, W Vir Class Type II Cepheid with a smaller, dimmer companion. The system 81.8997.87 contains an intermediate-mass, 2.03-day overtone Cepheid with a dimmer, red giant secondary.
  • We present 42 low-resolution spectra of Supernova (SN) 1993J, our complete collection from the Lick and Keck Observatories, from day 3 after explosion to day 2454, as well as one Keck high-dispersion spectrum from day 383. SN 1993J began as an apparent SN II, albeit an unusual one. After a few weeks, a dramatic transition took place, as prominent helium lines emerged in the spectrum. SN 1993J had metamorphosed from a SN II to a SN IIb. Nebular spectra of SN 1993J closely resemble those of SNe Ib and Ic, but with a persistent H_alpha line. At very late times, the H_alpha emission line dominated the spectrum, but with an unusual, box-like profile. This is interpreted as an indication of circumstellar interaction.