• We present an updated release of the BaSTI (a Bag of Stellar Tracks and Isochrones) stellar model and isochrone library for a solar scaled heavy element distribution. The main input physics changed from the previous BaSTI release include the solar metal mixture, electron conduction opacities, a few nuclear reaction rates, bolometric corrections, and the treatment of the overshooting efficiency for shrinking convective cores. The new model calculations cover a mass range between 0.1 and 15 Msun, 22 initial chemical compositions between [Fe/H]=-3.20 and +0.45, with helium to metal enrichment ratio dY /dZ=1.31. The isochrones cover an age range between 20 Myr and 14.5 Gyr, take consistently into account the pre-main sequence phase, and have been translated to a large number of popular photometric systems. Asteroseismic properties of the theoretical models have also been calculated. We compare our isochrones with results from independent databases and with several sets of observations, to test the accuracy of the calculations. All stellar evolution tracks, asteroseismic properties and isochrones are made available through a dedicated Web site.
  • We present the star formation history (SFH) of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on deep archive $B$,$I$ photometry taken with Suprime-Cam at Subaru telescope focusing our analysis on the inner region of the galaxy, fully located within the core radius. Within the errors of our SFH we have not detected any metallicity gradient along the considered radial distance interval. As a main result of this work we can state that the Sextans dwarf spheroidal stopped forming stars less than $\sim1.3$ Gyr after Big Bang in correspondance to the end of the reionization epoch. We have been able to constrain the duration of the main burst of star formation to $\sim0.6$ Gyr. From the calculation of the mechanical luminosity released from supernovae (SNe) during the brief episode of star formation, there are strong indications that SNe could have played an important role in the fate of Sextans, by removing almost completely the gas component, so preventing a prolonged star formation.
  • Open clusters (OCs) are crucial for studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, the lack of a large number of OCs analyzed homogeneously hampers the investigations about chemical patterns and the existence of Galactocentric radial and vertical gradients, or an age-metallicity relation. To overcome this, we have designed the Open Cluster Chemical Abundances from Spanish Observatories survey (OCCASO). We aim to provide homogeneous radial velocities, physical parameters and individual chemical abundances of six or more Red Clump stars for a sample of 25 old and intermediate-age OCs visible from the Northern hemisphere. To do so, we use high resolution spectroscopic facilities (R> 62,000) available at Spanish observatories. We present the motivation, design and current status of the survey, together with the first data release of radial velocities for 77 stars in 12 OCs, which represents about 50% of the survey. We include clusters never studied with high-resolution spectroscopy before (NGC~1907, NGC~6991, NGC~7762), and clusters in common with other large spectroscopic surveys like the Gaia-ESO Survey (NGC~6705) and APOGEE (NGC~2682 and NGC~6819). We perform internal comparisons between instruments to evaluate and correct internal systematics of the results, and compare our radial velocities with previous determinations in the literature, when available. Finally, radial velocities for each cluster are used to perform a preliminar kinematic study in relation with the Galactic disc.
  • We present a detailed photometric study of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 aimed at investigating the properties of its stellar populations and, in particular, the presence of stellar radial gradients. Our goal is to analyse the stellar populations in six fields, which cover the whole bar of this dwarf galaxy. We derived the quantitative star formation history (SFH) of the six fields using the IAC method, involving IAC-pop/MinnIAC codes. The solutions we derived show an enhanced star formation rate (SFR) in Fields 1 and 3 during the past 500 Myr. The SFRs of the other fields are almost extinguished at very recent epochs and. We study the radial gradients of the SFR and consider the total mass converted into stars in two time intervals (between 0 and 0.5 Gyr ago and between 0.5 and 13.5 Gyr ago). We find that the scale lengths of the young and intermediate-to-old populations are perfectly compatible, with the exception of the young populations in Fields 1 and 3. The recent SF in these two fields is greater than in the other ones. This might be an indication that in these two fields we are sampling incipient spiral arms. Further evidence and new observations are required to prove this hypothesis. In addition, we derived the age-metallicity relations. As expected, the metallicity increases with time for all of the fields. We do not observe any radial gradient in the metallicity.
  • Context. The Vista Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is a variability survey of the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk carried out from 2010 on ESO Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). VVV will eventually deliver a deep near-IR atlas with photometry and positions in five passbands (ZYJHK_S) and a catalogue of 1-10 million variable point sources - mostly unknown - which require classifications. Aims. The main goal of the VVV Templates Project, that we introduce in this work, is to develop and test the machine-learning algorithms for the automated classification of the VVV light-curves. As VVV is the first massive, multi-epoch survey of stellar variability in the near-infrared, the template light-curves that are required for training the classification algorithms are not available. In the first paper of the series we describe the construction of this comprehensive database of infrared stellar variability. Methods. First we performed a systematic search in the literature and public data archives, second, we coordinated a worldwide observational campaign, and third we exploited the VVV variability database itself on (optically) well-known stars to gather high-quality infrared light-curves of several hundreds of variable stars. Results. We have now collected a significant (and still increasing) number of infrared template light-curves. This database will be used as a training-set for the machine-learning algorithms that will automatically classify the light-curves produced by VVV. The results of such an automated classification will be covered in forthcoming papers of the series.
  • With the NEOWISE portion of the \emph{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) project, we have carried out a highly uniform survey of the near-Earth object (NEO) population at thermal infrared wavelengths ranging from 3 to 22 $\mu$m, allowing us to refine estimates of their numbers, sizes, and albedos. The NEOWISE survey detected NEOs the same way whether they were previously known or not, subject to the availability of ground-based follow-up observations, resulting in the discovery of more than 130 new NEOs. The survey's uniformity in sensitivity, observing cadence, and image quality have permitted extrapolation of the 428 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic portion of the WISE mission to the larger population. We find that there are 981$\pm$19 NEAs larger than 1 km and 20,500$\pm$3000 NEAs larger than 100 m. We show that the Spaceguard goal of detecting 90% of all 1 km NEAs has been met, and that the cumulative size distribution is best represented by a broken power law with a slope of 1.32$\pm$0.14 below 1.5 km. This power law slope produces $\sim13,200\pm$1,900 NEAs with $D>$140 m. Although previous studies predict another break in the cumulative size distribution below $D\sim$50-100 m, resulting in an increase in the number of NEOs in this size range and smaller, we did not detect enough objects to comment on this increase. The overall number for the NEA population between 100-1000 m are lower than previous estimates. The numbers of near-Earth comets will be the subject of future work.
  • Context: The discovery of new massive star clusters and massive stellar populations in previously known clusters in our Galaxy by means of infrared studies has changed our view of the Milky Way from an inactive to an active star-forming machine. Within this scenario, we present a near-infrared spectrophotometric study of the stellar content of the compact H II region Sh2-152. Aims: We aim to determine the distance, extinction, age, and mass of Sh2-152, using for the first time near-infrared stellar classification for several sources in the region. Methods: Using our near-infrared (J, H, and Ks) photometry and the colour-magnitude diagram for the cluster field, we selected 13 bright stars, candidate members of the reddened cluster's main sequence, for H- and K- spectroscopy and spectral classification. This near-infrared information was complemented with an optical spectrum of the ionizing central star to confirm its spectral nature. Results: From the 13 spectroscopically observed stars, 5 were classified as B-type, 3 as G-type, 2 were young stellar objects (YSOs), and 3 remained unclassified (because of the poor data quality). The cluster's extinction varies from A_{Ks}=0.5 to 2.6 magnitudes (A_V=4.5 to 24 magnitudes) and the distance is estimated to be 3.21\pm0.21 kpc. The age of the cluster is younger than 9.4 Myr and the lower limit to the total mass of the cluster is (2.45\pm0.79)\cdot10^3 M_{Sun}. We compare the number of ionizing photons emitted from the OB-type stars with the Lyman continuum photons derived from the radio observations and conclude that both quantities are consistent for the central region of Sh2-152. In contrast, the main ionizing source of the lower region remains unidentified.
  • We present the star formation history (SFH) and its variations with galactocentric distance for the Local Group dwarf galaxy of Phoenix. Color-magnitude diagram was obtained from WFPC2@HST reaching the oldest main sequence turnoffs. The IAC-star and IAC-pop codes and the MinnIAC suite have been used to obtain the star formation rate as a function of time, metallicity, and radius. We find that Phoenix has had ongoing but gradually decreasing star formation over nearly a Hubble time. The highest level of star formation occurred from the formation of the galaxy till 10.5 Gyr ago, when 50% of the total star formation had already taken place. From that moment, star formation continues at a significant level until 6 Gyr ago, and at a very low level till the present time. The chemical enrichment law shows a trend of slowly increasing metallicity as a function of time till 8--6 Gyr ago, when Z starts to increase steeply to the current value. Young stars are found in the inner region of the galaxy only, but intermediate-age and old stars can be found at all galactocentric distances. This study shows that star formation started at all galactocentric distances in Phoenix at an early epoch. Our results are compatible with a scenario in which the star formation region envelope slowly shrinks as time goes on, possibly as a natural result of pressure support reduction as gas supply diminishes. As a consequence, star formation stopped first in outer regions and the scale-length of the stellar mass density distribution decreased with time. No traces of a true, old halo are apparent in Phoenix either in its stellar age distribution or in the stellar mass density distribution, at least out to 0.5 kpc (about 2.5 scale-lengths) from the center.
  • As part of a major program to use isolated Local Group dwarf galaxies as near-field probes of cosmology, we have obtained deep images of the dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. From these images we have constructed a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaching apparent [absolute] magnitudes of (M475, M814) > (29.0 [+4.4], 27.9 [+3.4]), the deepest ever achieved for any irregular galaxy beyond the Magellanic Clouds. We derive the star-formation rate (SFR) as a function of time over the entire history of the galaxy. We find that over 90% of all the star formation that ever occurred in Leo A happened more recently than 8 Gyr ago. The CMD shows only a very small amount of star formation in the first few billion years after the Big Bang; a possible burst at the oldest ages cannot be claimed with high confidence. The peak SFR occurred ~1.5-4 Gyr ago, at a level 5-10 times the current value. Our modelling indicates that Leo A has experienced very little metallicity evolution; the mean inferred metallicity is consistent with measurements of the present-day gas-phase oxygen abundance. We cannot exclude a scenario in which ALL of the ancient star formation occurred prior to the end of the era of reionization, but it seems unlikely that the lack of star formation prior to ~8 Gyr ago was due to early loss or exhaustion of the in situ gas reservoir.