• Superconducting spintronics in hybrid superconductor/ferromagnet (S-F) heterostructures provides an exciting potential new class of device. The prototypical super-spintronic device is the superconducting spin-valve, where the critical temperature, $T_c$, of the S-layer can be controlled by the relative orientation of two (or more) F-layers. Here, we show that such control is also possible in a simple S/F bilayer. Using field history to set the remanent magnetic state of a thin Er layer, we demonstrate for a Nb/Er bilayer a high level of control of both $T_c$ and the shape of the resistive transition, R(T), to zero resistance. We are able to model the origin of the remanent magnetization, treating it as an increase in the effective exchange field of the ferromagnet and link this, using conventional S-F theory, to the suppression of $T_c$. We observe stepped features in the R(T) which we argue is due to a fundamental interaction of superconductivity with inhomogeneous ferromagnetism, a phenomena currently lacking theoretical description.
  • We report measurements on yttrium iron garnet (YIG) thin films grown on both gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) and yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) substrates, with and without thin Pt top layers. We provide three principal results: the observation of an interfacial region at the Pt/YIG interface, we place a limit on the induced magnetism of the Pt layer and confirm the existence of an interfacial layer at the GGG/YIG interface. Polarised neutron reflectometry (PNR) was used to give depth dependence of both the structure and magnetism of these structures. We find that a thin film of YIG on GGG is best described by three distinct layers: an interfacial layer near the GGG, around 5 nm thick and non-magnetic, a magnetic bulk phase, and a non-magnetic and compositionally distinct thin layer near the surface. We theorise that the bottom layer, which is independent of the film thickness, is caused by Gd diffusion. The top layer is likely to be extremely important in inverse spin Hall effect measurements, and is most likely Y2O3 or very similar. Magnetic sensitivity in the PNR to any induced moment in the Pt is increased by the existence of the Y2O3 layer; any moment is found to be less than 0.02 uB/atom.
  • We report on the crossover from the thermal to athermal regime of an artificial spin ice formed from a square array of magnetic islands whose lateral size, 30~nm~$\times$~70~nm, is small enough that they are superparamagnetic at room temperature. We used resonant magnetic soft x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) as a method to observe the time-time correlations of the fluctuating magnetic configurations of spin ice during cooling, which are found to slow abruptly as a freezing temperature $T_0 = 178 \pm 5$~K is approached. This slowing is well-described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law, implying that the frozen state is glassy, with the freezing temperature being commensurate with the strength of magnetostatic interaction energies in the array. The activation temperature, $T_\mathrm{A} = 40 \pm 10$~K, is much less than that expected from a Stoner-Wohlfarth coherent rotation model. Zero-field-cooled/field-cooled magnetometry reveals a freeing up of fluctuations of states within islands above this temperature, caused by variation in the local anisotropy axes at the oxidised edges. This Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behavior implies that the system enters a glassy state on freezing, which is unexpected for a system with a well-defined ground state.
  • Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Its basic building blocks are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins, which are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. Using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we find an entirely unexpected novel effect: the appearance of a magnetization in a thin layer of a non-magnetic metal (gold), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a 50 nm thick superconducting layer of Nb. The effect can be controlled by either temperature or by using a magnetic field to control the state of the remote ferromagnetic elements and may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.
  • Chemically ordered B2 FeRh exhibits a remarkable antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase transition that is first order. It thus shows phase coexistence, usually by proceeding though nucleation at random defect sites followed by propagation of phase boundary domain walls. The transition occurs at a temperature that can be varied by doping other metals onto the Rh site. We have taken advantage of this to yield control over the transition process by preparing an epilayer with oppositely directed doping gradients of Pd and Ir throughout its height, yielding a gradual transition that occurs between 350~K and 500~K. As the sample is heated, a horizontal antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase boundary domain wall moves gradually up through the layer, its position controlled by the temperature. This mobile magnetic domain wall affects the magnetisation and resistivity of the layer in a way that can be controlled, and hence exploited, for novel device applications.
  • We report x-ray synchrotron experiments on epitaxial films of uranium, deposited on niobium and tungsten seed layers. Despite similar lattice parameters for these refractory metals, the uranium epitaxial arrangements are different and the strains propagated along the a-axis of the uranium layers are of opposite sign. At low temperatures these changes in epitaxy result in dramatic modifications to the behavior of the charge-density wave in uranium. The differences are explained with the current theory for the electron-phonon coupling in the uranium lattice. Our results emphasize the intriguing possibilities of producing epitaxial films of elements that have complex structures like the light actinides uranium to plutonium.
  • Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antiferromagnets as the active component in spintronic devices. This is in contrast to their current passive role as pinning layers in hard disk read heads and magnetic memories. Here we report the epitaxial growth of a new high-temperature antiferromagnetic material, tetragonal CuMnAs, which exhibits excellent crystal quality, chemical order and compatibility with existing semiconductor technologies. We demonstrate its growth on the III-V semiconductors GaAs and GaP, and show that the structure is also lattice matched to Si. Neutron diffraction shows collinear antiferromagnetic order with a high Ne\'el temperature. Combined with our demonstration of room-temperature exchange coupling in a CuMnAs/Fe bilayer, we conclude that tetragonal CuMnAs films are suitable candidate materials for antiferromagnetic spintronics.
  • Quenched disorder affects how non-equilibrium systems respond to driving. In the context of artificial spin ice, an athermal system comprised of geometrically frustrated classical Ising spins with a two-fold degenerate ground state, we give experimental and numerical evidence of how such disorder washes out edge effects, and provide an estimate of disorder strength in the experimental system. We prove analytically that a sequence of applied fields with fixed amplitude is unable to drive the system to its ground state from a saturated state. These results should be relevant for other systems where disorder does not change the nature of the ground state.
  • The thermally-driven formation and evolution of vertex domains is studied for square artificial spin ice. A self consistent mean field theory is used to show how domains of ground state ordering form spontaneously, and how these evolve in the presence of disorder. The role of fluctuations is studied, using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical modelling. Domain wall dynamics are shown to be driven by a biasing of random fluctuations towards processes that shrink closed domains, and fluctuations within domains are shown to generate isolated small excitations, which may stabilise as the effective temperature is lowered. Domain dynamics and fluctuations are determined by interaction strengths, which are controlled by inter-element spacing. The role of interaction strength is studied via experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. Our mean field model is applicable to ferroelectric `spin' ice, and we show that features similar to that of magnetic spin ice can be expected, but with different characteristic temperatures and rates.
  • We have studied how the magnetic properties of oxygen-deficient EuO sputtered thin films vary as a function of thickness. The magnetic moment, measured by polarized neutron reflectometry, and the Curie temperature are found to decrease with reducing thickness. Our results indicate that the reduced number of nearest neighbors, band bending and the partial depopulation of the electronic states that carry the spins associated with the 4f orbitals of Eu are all contributing factors in the surface-induced change of the magnetic properties of EuO$_{1-x}$.
  • We report and discuss the first neutron reflection measurements from the free surface of normal and superfluid 4He and of liquid 3He-4He mixture. In case of liquid 4He the surface roughness is different above and below the lambda transition, being smoother in the superfluid state. For the superfluid, we also observe the formation of a surface layer ~200 A thick which has a subtly different neutron scattering cross-section. The results can be interpreted as an enhancement of Bose-Einstein condensate fraction close to the helium surface. We find that the addition of 3He isotopic impurities leads to the formation of Andreev levels at low temperatures.
  • The reflection of neutrons from a helium surface has been observed for the first time. The 4He surface is smoother in the superfluid state at 1.54 K than in the case of the normal liquid at 2.3 K. In the superfluid state we also observe a surface layer ~200 Angstroms thick which has a subtly different neutron scattering cross-section, which may be explained by an enhanced Bose-Einstein condensate fraction close to the helium surface.
  • Recent calculations, concerning the magnetism of uranium in the U/Fe multilayer system have described the spatial dependence of the 5f polarization that might be expected. We have used the x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity technique to obtain the profile of the induced uranium magnetic moment for selected U/Fe multilayer samples. This study extends the use of x-ray magnetic scattering for induced moment systems to the 5f actinide metals. The spatial dependence of the U magnetization shows that the predominant fraction of the polarization is present at the interfacial boundaries, decaying rapidly towards the center of the uranium layer, in good agreement with predictions.
  • The role of dipolar interactions and anisotropy are important to obtain, otherwise forbidden, ferromagnetic ordering at finite temperature for ions arranged in two-dimensional (2D) arrays (monolayers). Here we demonstrate that conventional low temperature magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering measurements can be performed to study ferromagnetic ordering of in-plane spins in 2D systems using a multilayer stack of non-interacting monolayers of gadolinium ions. The spontaneous magnetization is absent in the heterogenous magnetic phase observed here and the saturation value of the net magnetization was found to depend on the applied magnetic field. The net magnetization rises exponentially with lowering temperature and then reaches saturation following a $T\ln(\beta T)$ dependence. These findings verify predictions of the spin-wave theory of 2D in-plane spin system with ferromagnetic interaction and will initiate further theoretical development.