• We report results of an extensive world-wide observing campaign devoted to the recently discovered dwarf nova SDSS J162520.29+120308.7 (SDSS J1625). The data were obtained during the July 2010 eruption of the star and in August and September 2010 when the object was in quiescence. During the July 2010 superoutburst SDSS J1625 clearly displayed superhumps with a mean period of $P_{\rm sh}=0.095942(17)$ days ($138.16 \pm 0.02$ min) and a maximum amplitude reaching almost 0.4 mag. The superhump period was not stable, decreasing very rapidly at a rate of $\dot P = -1.63(14)\cdot 10^{-3}$ at the beginning of the superoutburst and increasing at a rate of $\dot P = 2.81(20)\cdot 10^{-4}$ in the middle phase. At the end of the superoutburst it stabilized around the value of $P_{\rm sh}=0.09531(5)$ day. During the first twelve hours of the superoutburst a low-amplitude double wave modulation was observed whose properties are almost identical to early superhumps observed in WZ Sge stars. The period of early superhumps, the period of modulations observed temporarily in quiescence and the period derived from radial velocity variations are the same within measurement errors, allowing us to estimate the most probable orbital period of the binary to be $P_{\rm orb}=0.09111(15)$ days ($131.20 \pm 0.22$ min). This value clearly indicates that SDSS J1625 is another dwarf nova in the period gap. Knowledge of the orbital and superhump periods allows us to estimate the mass ratio of the system to be $q\approx 0.25$. This high value poses serious problems both for the thermal and tidal instability (TTI) model describing the behaviour of dwarf novae and for some models explaining the origin of early superhumps.
  • Aims: We investigate the physical nature of the X-ray emitting source 1RXS J165443.5-191620 through optical photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy. Methods: Optical photometry is obtained from a variety of telescopes all over the world spanning about 27 days. Additionally, time-resolved spectroscopy is obtained from the MDM observatory. Results: The optical photometry clearly displays modulations consistent with those observed in magnetic cataclysmic variables: a low-frequency signal interpreted as the orbital period, a high-frequency signal interpreted as the white dwarf spin period, and an orbital sideband modulation. Our findings and interpretations are further confirmed through optical, time-resolved, spectroscopy that displays H-alpha radial velocity shifts modulated on the binary orbital period. Conclusion: We confirm the true nature of 1RXS J165443.5-191620 as an intermediate polar with a spin period of 546 seconds and an orbital period of 3.7 hours. In particular, 1RXS J165443.5-191620 is part of a growing subset of intermediate polars, all displaying hard X-ray emission above 15keV, white dwarf spin periods below 30 minutes, and spin-to-orbital ratios below 0.1.