• Nanoelectronic devices embedded in the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure enable a large variety of applications from fundamental research to high speed transistors. Electrical circuits are thereby commonly defined by creating barriers for carriers by selective depletion of a pre-existing 2DES. Here we explore an alternative approach: we deplete the 2DES globally by applying a negative voltage to a global top gate and screen the electric field of the top gate only locally using nanoscale gates placed on the wafer surface between the plane of the 2DES and the top gate. Free carriers are located beneath the screen gates and their properties can be controlled by means of geometry and applied voltages. This method promises considerable advantages for the definition of complex circuits by the electric field effect as it allows to reduce the number of gates and simplify gate geometries. Examples are carrier systems with ring topology or large arrays of quantum dots. Here, we present a first exploration of this method pursuing field effect, Hall effect and Aharonov-Bohm measurements to study electrostatic, dynamic and coherent properties.
  • We investigate experimentally and theoretically the interference at avoided crossings which are repeatedly traversed as a consequence of an applied ac field. Our model system is a charge qubit in a serial double quantum dot connected to two leads. Our focus lies on effects caused by simultaneous driving with two different frequencies. We work out how the commensurability of the driving frequencies affects the symmetry of the interference patterns both in real space and in Fourier space. For commensurable frequencies, the symmetry depends sensitively on the relative phase between the two modes, whereas for incommensurable frequencies the symmetry of monochromatic driving is always recovered.
  • Breaking time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in the absence of a net bias can give rise to directed steady-state non-equilibrium transport phenomena such as ratchet effects. Here we present, theoretically and experimentally, the concept of a Lissajous rocking ratchet as an instrument based on breaking TRS. Our system is a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) with periodically modulated dot-lead tunnel barriers. Broken TRS gives rise to single electron tunneling current. Its direction is fully controlled by exploring frequency and phase relations between the two barrier modulations. The concept of Lissajous ratchets can be realized in a large variety of different systems, including nano-electrical, nano-electromechanical or superconducting circuits. It promises applications based on a detailed on-chip comparison of radio-frequency signals.
  • On-chip magnets can be used to implement relatively large local magnetic field gradients in na- noelectronic circuits. Such field gradients provide possibilities for all-electrical control of electron spin-qubits where important coupling constants depend crucially on the detailed field distribution. We present a double quantum dot (QD) hybrid device laterally defined in a GaAs / AlGaAs het- erostructure which incorporates two single domain nanomagnets. They have appreciably different coercive fields which allows us to realize four distinct configurations of the local inhomogeneous field distribution. We perform dc transport spectroscopy in the Pauli-spin blockade regime as well as electric-dipole-induced spin resonance (EDSR) measurements to explore our hybrid nanodevice. Characterizing the two nanomagnets we find excellent agreement with numerical simulations. By comparing the EDSR measurements with a second double QD incorporating just one nanomagnet we reveal an important advantage of having one magnet per QD: It facilitates strong field gradients in each QD and allows to control the electron spins individually for instance in an EDSR experi- ment. With just one single domain nanomagnet and common QD geometries EDSR can likely be performed only in one QD.
  • We investigate energy transfer between counter-propagating quantum Hall edge channels (ECs) in a two-dimensional electron system at filling factor \nu=1. The ECs are separated by a thin impenetrable potential barrier and Coulomb coupled, thereby constituting a quasi one-dimensional analogue of a spinless Luttinger liquid (LL). We drive one, say hot, EC far from thermal equilibrium and measure the energy transfer rate P into the second, cold, EC using a quantum point contact as a bolometer. The dependence of P on the drive bias indicates breakdown of the momentum conservation, whereas P is almost independent on the length of the region where the ECs interact. Interpreting our results in terms of plasmons (collective density excitations), we find that the energy transfer between the ECs occurs via plasmon backscattering at the boundaries of the LL. The backscattering probability is determined by the LL interaction parameter and can be tuned by changing the width of the electrostatic potential barrier between the ECs.
  • A Quantum Point Contact (QPC) causes a one-dimensional constriction on the spatial potential landscape of a two-dimensional electron system. By tuning the voltage applied on a QPC at low temperatures the resulting regular step-like electron conductance quantization can show an additional kink near pinch-off around 0.7(2$e^2$/h), called 0.7-anomaly. In a recent publication, we presented a combination of theoretical calculations and transport measurements that lead to a detailed understanding of the microscopic origin of the 0.7-anomaly. Functional Renormalization Group-based calculations were performed exhibiting the 0.7-anomaly even when no symmetry-breaking external magnetic fields are involved. According to the calculations the electron spin susceptibility is enhanced within a QPC that is tuned in the region of the 0.7-anomaly. Moderate externally applied magnetic fields impose a corresponding enhancement in the spin magnetization. In principle, it should be possible to map out this spin distribution optically by means of the Faraday rotation technique. Here we report the initial steps of an experimental project aimed at realizing such measurements. Simulations were performed on a particularly pre-designed semiconductor heterostructure. Based on the simulation results a sample was built and its basic transport and optical properties were investigated. Finally, we introduce a sample gate design, suitable for combined transport and optical studies.
  • Controlling coherent interaction at avoided crossings is at the heart of quantum information processing. The regime between sudden switches and adiabatic transitions is characterized by quantum superpositions that enable interference experiments. Here, we implement periodic passages at intermediate speed in a GaAs-based two-electron charge qubit and observe Landau-Zener-St\"uckelberg-Majorana (LZSM) quantum interference of the resulting superposition state. We demonstrate that LZSM interferometry is a viable and very general tool to not only study qubit properties but beyond to decipher decoherence caused by complex environmental influences. Our scheme is based on straightforward steady state experiments. The coherence time of our two-electron charge qubit is limited by electron-phonon interaction. It is much longer than previously reported for similar structures.
  • In this work we report experiments on defined by shallow etching narrow Hall bars. The magneto-transport properties of intermediate mobility two-dimensional electron systems are investigated and analyzed within the screening theory of the integer quantized Hall effect. We observe a non-monotonic increase of Hall resistance at the low magnetic field ends of the quantized plateaus, known as the overshoot effect. Unexpectedly, for Hall bars that are defined by shallow chemical etching the overshoot effect becomes more pronounced at elevated temperatures. We observe the overshoot effect at odd and even integer plateaus, which favor a spin independent explanation, in contrast to discussion in the literature. In a second set of the experiments, we investigate the overshoot effect in gate defined Hall bar and explicitly show that the amplitude of the overshoot effect can be directly controlled by gate voltages. We offer a comprehensive explanation based on scattering between evanescent incompressible channels.
  • Spin qubits have been successfully realized in electrostatically defined, lateral few-electron quantum dot circuits. Qubit readout typically involves spin to charge information conversion, followed by a charge measurement made using a nearby biased quantum point contact. It is critical to understand the back-action disturbances resulting from such a measurement approach. Previous studies have indicated that quantum point contact detectors emit phonons which are then absorbed by nearby qubits. We report here the observation of a pronounced back-action effect in multiple dot circuits where the absorption of detector-generated phonons is strongly modified by a quantum interference effect, and show that the phenomenon is well described by a theory incorporating both the quantum point contact and coherent phonon absorption. Our combined experimental and theoretical results suggest strategies to suppress back-action during the qubit readout procedure.
  • We study theoretically nonequilibrium Landau-Zener-St\"uckelberg (LZS) dynamics in a driven double quantum dot (DQD) including dephasing and, importantly, energy relaxation due to environmental fluctuations. We derive effective nonequilibrium Bloch equations. These allow us to identify clear signatures for LZS oscilations observed but not recognized as such in experiments [Petersson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 246804, 2010] and to identify the full environmental fluctuation spectra acting on a DQD given experimental data as in [Petersson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 246804, 2010]. Herein we find that super-Ohmic fluctuations, typically due to phonons, are the main relaxation channel for a detuned DQD whereas Ohmic fluctuations dominate at zero detuning.
  • The capacitive couplings between gate-defined quantum dots and their gates vary considerably as a function of applied gate voltages. The conversion between gate voltages and the relevant energy scales is usually performed in a regime of rather symmetric dot-lead tunnel couplings strong enough to allow direct transport measurements. Unfortunately this standard procedure fails for weak and possibly asymmetric tunnel couplings, often the case in realistic devices. We have developed methods to determine the gate voltage to energy conversion accurately in the different regimes of dot-lead tunnel couplings and demonstrate strong variations of the conversion factors. Our concepts can easily be extended to triple quantum dots or even larger arrays.
  • The energy relaxation channels of hot electrons far from thermal equilibrium in a degenerate two-dimensional electron system are investigated in transport experiments in a mesoscopic three-terminal device. We observe a transition from two dimensions at zero magnetic field to quasi--one-dimensional scattering of the hot electrons in a strong magnetic field. In the two-dimensional case electron-electron scattering is the dominant relaxation mechanism, while the emission of optical phonons becomes more and more important as the magnetic field is increased. The observation of up to 11 optical phonons emitted per hot electron allows us to determine the onset energy of LO phonons in GaAs at cryogenic temperatures with a high precision, $\eph=36.0\pm0.1\,$meV. Numerical calculations of electron-electron scattering and the emission of optical phonons underline our interpretation in terms of a transition to one-dimensional dynamics.
  • A three-terminal device based on a two-dimensional electron system is investigated in the regime of non-equilibrium transport. Excited electrons scatter with the cold Fermi sea and transfer energy and momentum to other electrons. A geometry analogous to a water jet pump is used to create a jet pump for electrons. Because of its phenomenological similarity we name the observed behavior "electronic Venturi effect".
  • We explore the acoustic phonon-based interaction between two neighboring coplanar circuits containing semiconductor quantum point contacts in a perpendicular magnetic field B. In a drag-type experiment, a current flowing in one of the circuits (unbiased) is measured in response to an external current in the other. In moderate B the sign of the induced current is determined solely by the polarity of B. This indicates that the spatial regions where the phonon emission/reabsorption is efficient are controlled by magnetic field. The results are interpreted in terms of non-equilibrium transport via skipping orbits in two-dimensional electron system.
  • Time-resolved electron dynamics in coupled quantum dots is directly observed by a pulsed-gate technique. While individual gate voltages are modulated with periodic pulse trains, average charge occupations are measured with a nearby quantum point contact as detector. A key component of our setup is a sample holder optimized for broadband radio frequency applications. Our setup can detect displacements of single electrons on time scales well below a nanosecond. Tunneling rates through individual barriers and relaxation times are obtained by using a rate equation model. We demonstrate the full characterization of a tunable double quantum dot using this technique, which could also be used for coherent charge qubit control.
  • Scattering of otherwise ballistic electrons far from equilibrium is investigated in a cold two-dimensional electron system. The interaction between excited electrons and the degenerate Fermi liquid induces a positive charge in a nanoscale region which would be negatively charged for diffusive transport at local thermal equilibrium. In a three-terminal device we observe avalanche amplification of electrical current, resulting in a situation comparable to the Venturi effect in hydrodynamics. Numerical calculations using a random phase approximation are in agreement with our data and suggest Coulomb interaction as the dominant scattering mechanism.
  • We present an electrostatically defined few-electron double quantum dot (QD) realized in a molecular beam epitaxy grown Si/SiGe heterostructure. Transport and charge spectroscopy with an additional QD as well as pulsed-gate measurements are demonstrated. We discuss technological challenges specific for silicon-based heterostructures and the effect of a comparably large effective electron mass on transport properties and tunability of the double QD. Charge noise, which might be intrinsically induced due to strain-engineering is proven not to affect the stable operation of our device as a spin qubit. Our results promise the suitability of electrostatically defined QDs in Si/SiGe heterostructures for quantum information processing.
  • Quantum point contacts (QPCs) are commonly employed to capacitively detect the charge state of coupled quantum dots (QD). An indirect back-action of a biased QPC onto a double QD laterally defined in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure is observed. Energy is emitted by non-equilibrium charge carriers in the leads of the biased QPC. Part of this energy is absorbed by the double QD where it causes charge fluctuations that can be observed under certain conditions in its stability diagram. By investigating the spectrum of the absorbed energy, we identify both acoustic phonons and Coulomb interaction being involved in the back-action, depending on the geometry and coupling constants.
  • An asymmetric break-down of the integer quantized Hall effect is investigated. This rectification effect is observed as a function of the current value and its direction in conjunction with an asymmetric lateral confinement potential defining the Hall-bar. Our electrostatic definition of the Hall-bar via Schottky-gates allows a systematic control of the steepness of the confinement potential at the edges of the Hall-bar. A softer edge (flatter confinement potential) results in more stable Hall-plateaus, i.e. a break-down at a larger current density. For one soft and one hard edge the break-down current depends on the current direction, resembling rectification. This non-linear magneto-transport effect confirms the predictions of an emerging screening theory of the IQHE.
  • We present a versatile design of freely suspended quantum point contacts with particular large one-dimensional subband quantization energies of up to 10meV. The nanoscale bridges embedding a two-dimensional electron system are fabricated from AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by electron-beam lithography and etching techniques. Narrow constrictions define quantum point contacts that are capacitively controlled via local in-plane side gates. Employing transport spectroscopy, we investigate the transition from electrostatic subbands to Landau-quantization in a perpendicular magnetic field. The large subband quantization energies allow us to utilize a wide magnetic field range and thereby observe a large exchange splitted spin-gap of the two lowest Landau-levels.
  • Experimental and theoretical investigations on the integer quantized Hall effect in gate defined narrow Hall bars are presented. At low electron mobility the classical (high temperature) Hall resistance line RH(B) cuts through the center of all Hall plateaus. In contrast, for our high mobility samples the intersection point, at even filling factors \nu = 2; 4 ..., is clearly shifted towards larger magnetic fields B. This asymmetry is in good agreement with predictions of the screening theory, i. e. taking Coulomb interaction into account. The observed effect is directly related to the formation of incompressible strips in the Hall bar. The spin-split plateau at \nu= 1 is found to be almost symmetric regardless of the mobility. We explain this within the so-called effective g-model.
  • Interactions between mesoscopic devices induced by interface acoustic phonons propagating in the plane of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) are investigated by phonon-spectroscopy. In our experiments ballistic electrons injected from a biased quantum point contact emit phonons and a portion of them are reabsorbed exciting electrons in a nearby degenerate 2DES. We perform energy spectroscopy on these excited electrons employing a tunable electrostatic barrier in an electrically separate and unbiased detector circuit. The transferred energy is found to be bounded by a maximum value corresponding to Fermi-level electrons excited and back-scattered by absorbing interface phonons. Our results imply that phonon-mediated interaction plays an important role for the decoherence of solid-state-based quantum circuits.
  • We report on the realization and top-gating of a two-dimensional electron system in a nuclear spin free environment using 28Si and 70Ge source material in molecular beam epitaxy. Electron spin decoherence is expected to be minimized in nuclear spin-free materials, making them promising hosts for solid-state based quantum information processing devices. The two-dimensional electron system exhibits a mobility of 18000 cm2/Vs at a sheet carrier density of 4.6E11 cm-2 at low temperatures. Feasibility of reliable gating is demonstrated by transport through split-gate structures realized with palladium Schottky top-gates which effectively control the two-dimensional electron system underneath. Our work forms the basis for the realization of an electrostatically defined quantum dot in a nuclear spin free environment.
  • We briefly overview our recent results on nonequilibrium interactions between neighboring electrically isolated nanostructures. One of the nanostructures is represented by an externally biased quantum point contact (drive-QPC), which is used to supply energy quanta to the second nanostructure (detector). Absorption of these nonequilibrium quanta of energy generates a dc-current in the detector, or changes its differential conductance. We present results for a double quantum dot, a single quantum dot or a second QPC placed in the detector circuit. In all three cases a detection of quanta with energies up to ~1 meV is possible for bias voltages across the drive-QPC in the mV range. The results are qualitatively consistent with an energy transfer mechanism based on nonequilibrium acoustic phonons.
  • We report on optically induced transport phenomena in freely suspended channels containing a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The submicron devices are fabricated in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by etching techniques. The photoresponse of the devices can be understood in terms of the combination of photogating and a photodoping effect. The hereby enhanced electronic conductance exhibits a time constant in the range of one to ten milliseconds.